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We've announced just two international keynote speakers (so far) and that's partly because we've deliberately left room for some presentations by up and coming local speakers. That could be you. At Web Directions, a core mission is to help the industry here in Australia - and professionals like you who ARE the industry -  to develop and grow. A key aspect for us is identifying potential speakers, helping them find their feet and extending their experience and capabilities. Code 16 speakers We're proud to say we've had literally hundreds of speakers take their first step, and then further develop their speaking skills, on a Web Directions stage. Now, we'd like to invite you to submit a proposal to present  at this year's Code conference. Our call for presentations closes 31 May, so there's still more than a week to submit a proposal (don't worry - in our experience, 80% of proposals arrive after 4:40pm on the day of the deadline). All the details are on our Call For Presentations page, including what we do to help you if your submission is accepted. We do also keep track of potential speakers from our CFPs for all sorts of things, so even if your talk's not quite right (yet) for Code, this is a great way to get on our radar. Do pay careful attention to what we're asking for – we're quite specific in the topics we aim to address at each of our events." ["post_title"]=> string(49) "Calling All Speakers for Web Directions Code 2017" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "calling-speakers-web-directions-code-2017" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-23 11:27:50" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-23 01:27:50" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7491" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#949 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7478) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-19 13:17:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-19 03:17:44" ["post_content"]=> string(3264) "Alicia SedlockContinuing this week's broad theme of maintaining your code and making sure it does what it's supposed to do - preferably neither more nor less, our Video of the Week also comes from Code 16. Alicia Sedlock took us into the world of code testing: unit testing, acceptance testing, code linting, visual regression testing - the kind of work we know we should do but perhaps shy away from or skip over lightly sometimes, because it all seems too hard. The State of Front-End Testing pretty much dispels that myth, covering the breadth of testing strategies available and having the singular distinction of featuring a guest appearance from Alicia's hedgehog, Mabel - perhaps the cutest guest at a Web Directions talk ever.    

Got your ticket for 2017 yet?

For Code 17, we're putting together a truly remarkable two-day program of international and local speakers digging into front end engineering and development, coming to Melbourne (only) on 3-4 August. Come and join us!  

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.
" ["post_title"]=> string(66) "Video of the Week: The State of Front-End Testing - Alicia Sedlock" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(49) "video-week-state-front-end-testing-alicia-sedlock" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-19 13:24:02" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-19 03:24:02" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7478" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#950 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7456) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-17 09:31:15" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-16 23:31:15" ["post_content"]=> string(7133) "We have just opened registrations for Web Directions Code 17! For those new to it, and to remind those who know it well, Code has evolved to be the premier conference in Australia focusing on JavaScript, front end HTML/CSS, devops, engineering, web-facing programming, security, performance ... in short, code. The last time we held Code solely in Melbourne in 2015 at the same venue, we sold out quite some way in advance. We've kept the prices at 2015's, so make sure you don't miss out, register your ticket today. Whether you call yourself a coder, a programmer, a developer or an engineer - if your job is to deliver robust, fast, secure, engaging web experiences, Web Directions Code in Melbourne from 3-4 August is for you. Here's why. Code The Speakers We have an extraordinary line-up of speakers planned for Code: people who can lift your professional expertise to new levels, familiarising you now with techniques and tools that will become commonplace in the near future. Right now, we can confirm two of our leading speakers, and they are, indeed, world leaders in their fields. Brian Terlson & Val Head Brian Terlson is the editor of the JavaScript specification, and a long standing member of TC39, the committee standardising JavaScript. He's also a key developer of the JavaScript engine in the Edge browser. Who better to help us see where JavaScript is today, and where the next few years will take us? Val Head is one of the foremost experts in animation and the web anywhere. She's written extensively on the subject, advised companies like Shopify and Automattic (creators of WordPress) and spoken all over the world. Val will survey the full spectrum of animation options from CSS to React Motion and show which are best suited for implementing state transitions, showing data, animating illustrations, or making animations responsive. The Presentations These are just two of about 20 amazing speakers from around the world covering everything from core JavaScript features to complex modern CSS and best practice performance. Everything you need to stay up to date in our fast changing field. What is this Code of which you speak? Skip it - just let me register! We Want You to Present Our Call For Proposals to present at Code is now open. Yes, we curate the conference, but we like to leave room for outstanding, relevant talks from local speakers, experienced or not. Sessions are 20 minutes long, and open to Australian residents. If you're successful, we'll fly you to Melbourne, put you up, and treat you like any other speaker. The Code CFP is open until 31 May. OK, I'm interested in presenting Code Leaders We're also really excited to take the wraps off a brand new event, Code Leaders, a special day-long conference preceding Code. Code Leaders highlights the challenges being faced by a new generation of code-focused team leaders, project managers, CTOs and senior engineering professionals. Code Leaders The full-day conference draws on the skills and experience of some of our Code headliners as well as local expertise to explore issues of management and leadership in a code setting. You'll focus on technology, practice, leadership and cultural challenges in a collegial atmosphere with others facing challenges similar to your own. Take me to your Leaders Key Dates 31 May  Code 17 Call for Presentations ends. 30 June  End of Financial Year; Code and Code Leaders Early Bird ends. 2 August  Code Leaders Conference. 3-4 August Code Conference. Pricing We always keep our prices as low as we can, and we have complete confidence in the quality and relevance of our speakers and their presentations, but we also know that a little incentive can sometimes make it easier to find room in a limited budget, especially if you have to convince someone else. So, how about $200 off?  Register during the Early Bird period up to 30 June and get a massive $200 off the regular registration cost.
  • * Classic Code ticket (conference only) for just $999 (save $200)
  • * Silver Code ticket (conference plus videos) for just $1,099 (save $200)
  • * Gold Code ticket (conference, videos and speaker dinner) for just $1,199 (save $200)
  • * Code Leaders ticket for just $699(save $300 - not a typo)
  • * Or get both a Code Silver ticket and a Code Leaders ticket for just $1,499 (saving $800!)
Hot Tip: if you need to apply your registration to the new financial year but you still want to get the Early Bird discount and the alumnus bonus, register before 30 June but pay after 1 July Tell me more about Code 17 Embedded as a deeply Melbourne conference (and watch out soon for details of related Melbourne events), I feel this year's Web Directions Code offers an unmissable program, one of the real highlights of the Australian developer calendar. I look forward to telling you more in coming weeks, and I really hope to see you there. john john allsopp" ["post_title"]=> string(56) "Registrations Open for Code 17, First Speakers Announced" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(51) "registrations-open-code-17-first-speakers-announced" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-17 09:27:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-16 23:27:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7456" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#951 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7394) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-12 12:45:54" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-12 02:45:54" ["post_content"]=> string(7536) "I want to share with you our updated plans for the rest of 2017, and into 2018. Why are we changing the schedule? Well, as you may know, my sister Rosemary (who runs Web Directions with me) and I are dealing with some serious family health problems that require us to rethink how best we can deliver on our mission of helping the industry here in Australia grow. Consequently, we have revamped our events schedule to make the most of our available time and deliver the best possible events to further your professional development. That means scaling back some of our more ambitious plans, but also bringing forward some new smaller scale, specific-focus events. The first news is that Code will this year - and from now on - take place as a two-day single-track conference only in Melbourne, not also in Sydney and Brisbane. It will be the same mix of high profile international speakers, well known and respected locals and some new folks you've never heard of - the next generation. Web Directions Code will continue to be tailored to engineers, developers, coders, programmers and the people who work directly with them, focusing particularly - but not exclusively - on a front end context. Code This year marked the last appearance of the Respond conference in its current format. In 2018, Web Directions will host a new two-day conference called simply Design, focused not only on responsive web design, but also product design, service design and all the ways we design our users' and customers' online and offline experiences. Web Directions Design will also be held only in Melbourne. The exact dates are not yet completely confirmed, but the conference is slated for April 2018. Design   So, two big conferences each year in Melbourne. Where does that leave Sydney? The big news - the biggest, really - is that we are recasting the two-day single-track end-of-year Direction conference in Sydney into Web Directions Summit, a two-day DOUBLE-track end-of-year festival of web related development and design ideas, techniques, breakthroughs and possibilities; bringing together all your team members to address their individual, shared and collective areas of professional focus and expertise. Web Directions Summit will adopt the traditional Web Directions structure of one track of engineer-focused talks and another track more designer-focused; bookended on each day by keynote presentations from leading thinkers and practitioners in our fields from around the world. Summit   Web Directions Code and Web Directions Design in Melbourne, and Web Directions Summit in Sydney - a pretty fair balance. This year's Transform conference in Canberra will also be the last for a while, not because government-focused digital transformation is complete by any means, nor that there isn't clear support for the conference to continue and evolve. It's just the logistics that make this impractical for us in the immediate future. The same could be said for our plans to hold our conferences in Brisbane and to expand further afield, for that matter. For the time being, we'll put those plans on hold. But, rather than expand geographically, what we're going to do is broaden and deepen the topics and themes around which we structure our events. What that means is that we have three completely new events planned for the rest of 2017. First, in Melbourne, the day before Web Directions Code, we'll be holding a one day event called Web Directions Code Leaders, drawing on the expertise of visiting Code keynote speakers to provide professional guidance to local CTOs, code project managers, dev team leads, senior engineers - and anyone aspiring to that level of leadership. Code Leaders   Then in Sydney in September we launch Web Directions AI, a one-day conference on the technology, business and design of Artificial Intelligence. For our purposes, this incorporates and includes machine learning, cognitive computing, and a raft of related terms and technologies, centred around the application and implications of non-human "intelligence". AI   Sydney will also host our other new event for 2017, in October and in association with Spark Festival. Web Directions Careers fulfils a long held ambition to focus on both how to get started in our industry (call it Web and/or Digital, for now) and also how established practitioners can progress their careers. Careers   These three new events are all consistent with our stated aim to cover what comes next in our industry, to give you the tools to move forward. At the same time, we're confident tweaking our existing events will sharpen their focus and keep them forward looking and directly useful. There are two other things I want to mention. We will be holding What Do You Know sessions in various places to give aspiring speakers a chance to test material while simultaneously giving a warm supportive audience a preview of talks they may soon see in full. And, related to that, we will on Monday 15 May be issuing a Call For Proposals to present at Web Directions Code in Melbourne on 3-4 August. Thanks for your support, especially the people who have reached out directly, but also all of you who continue to show an interest in Web Directions. You can keep up with all our conferences and related events  on our Events page." ["post_title"]=> string(25) "The Big 2017 Events Reset" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(21) "big-2017-events-reset" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-12 12:53:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-12 02:53:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7394" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#952 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7208) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-04-18 12:16:54" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-04-18 01:16:54" ["post_content"]=> string(3777) "For closer to 20 than 10 years, I've made the argument that the quality of the code of a website (which is relatively easy to assess, compared to any sort of binary application, where code is almost impossible to assess in any meaningful way) - whether it validates, its approach to accessibility, its adoption of good practices and conventions - is an indicator of the overall approach of an organisation to the stuff you can't see. If an airline doesn't really care about getting its most visible technology - its website - right, what's going on with all its other technology? Like, oh I don't know, the technology that allows aeroplanes to travel kilometres above the earth at velocities approaching that of sound, with hundreds of people on board? As usual, very few people listened. But I have young children, so I'm used to that. However, I was reminded of this apparently quaint idea (something many adherents to a standards-based approach to web development would also have argued "back in the day") by an article titled What Web Page Structure Reveals on News Quality posted last week by Frederic Filloux, who writes frequently on the business and technology of the news media.   Imbricated HTML blocks viewed through a scanning electron microscope (CISRO Lab UK -Commons) The news media currently faces many, many challenges. Not least of these is the challenge of discerning the quality of an information source. This is what we might loosely call the "fake news" issue. Fake news is not just the traditional media's problem - it's all of ours, but especially it is a serious problem for Facebook and Google as the primary conduits of information of all kinds into many more than a billion people's lives. Human filtering simply doesn't scale to determining the veracity and trustworthiness of so many sources, so various individuals and groups are working on a project to algorithmically determine the quality and trustworthiness of a news source. Filloux described his project thus:
"The News Quality Scoring Project (NQS) is aimed at finding and quantifying 'signals' that convey content quality. The idea is to build a process that is scalable and largely automated. Incidentally, it will contribute to debunk fake news by 'triangulating' questionable sources."
That, of course, ties into my introductory observations about code quality as a proxy for a deeper sense of quality, using the HTML structure (what we today would call the design patterns) of a page as one indicator - among several others - of the quality of the site itself. It's not hard to find examples of poorly coded and marked up websites that present rubbish content on barely usable webpages. There's almost an instinct that comes into play where you know without even looking that those "gallery" style pages ("see what your favourite TV stars look like now") are going to turn out to be poorly coded. This, in turn, cuts straight to our overall perceptions of quality (terrible) and trustworthiness (none). But what about good design patterns? Can they be useful indicators of site quality? Filloux's project aims to find out." ["post_title"]=> string(27) "Code as a Signal of Quality" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(27) "code-as-a-signal-of-quality" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-04-18 12:16:54" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-04-18 01:16:54" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7208" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#953 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7033) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-24 12:00:00" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-24 01:00:00" ["post_content"]=> string(5707) "Those of us who work in Web and the digital arena don't have to be reminded that our fields are constantly updating. Whether it's underlying technologies, or broad strategic practices, what was cutting edge last year is often common practice this year, and out of date the next. Both in terms of our own professional development and the impact our work has on our company, organisation or clients, we all strive to keep up to date. But it's no shortcoming to say that's a lot of work. For many years, our primary focus at Web Directions has been to help our audience of professional practitioners in the Web and digital fields keep up to date. We spend our lives keeping track of the technologies, practices, and ideas that are shaping our fields, and we bring them to you via articles, newsletters, podcasts, and of course our conferences and workshops. All with the aim of helping you do your job as best as you can. But with the expansion of our conferences over the last couple of years, it's not as easy as simply coming to our big end of year conference anymore. By breaking out that one, multi-track behemoth into a number of more focused events, our aim is to deliver the best possible event for various groups of professionals within the industry. Here's a breakdown of each event, who it's for, and how you and your team will benefit from attending.

Respond: for the front end design team

Increasingly great customer experiences are delivered by multi-disciplinary teams. Respond is designed to reflect that reality, with in-depth content for Interaction Designers, UX and CX professionals, UI Engineers - along with high-level, strategic thinking relevant to the whole front end design team. Where else can you see people of the calibre of Mina Markham, the lead of the front end design efforts at the Hillary for America Campaign, world leader in web animation Rachel Nabors, or Elizabeth Allen, working at the forefront of conversation interfaces wth Shopify? All curated by John Allsopp, cited by Ethan Marcotte, inventor of Responsive Web Design, as a key inspiration for the ideas that became RWD.
Our promise
Respond delivers actionable insights on current best practice in front end design in the broadest sense, in two super condensed days, in three cities. Cut down on travel time and expense, and invest a small fraction of your working year getting out in front of current trends.

Code: the JavaScript and front end engineering conference

Progressive Web Apps were first publicly talked about by their inventor Alex Russell at Code. Object Oriented CSS (OOCSS) was launched on the world at another of our events. We've been tracking trends in the technologies of the Web since the early 1990s, and then bringing these ideas to our community at events and elsewhere since the early days of the Web. Code focuses on the fundamental building blocks of great Web experiences: JavaScript, CSS, Browser APIs - alongside best practices in performance, security, and software engineering for the Web. We believe it's a unique event, not just within Australia, but globally. And like Respond, Code is visiting Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane this year, in late July and early August.
Our promise
Code helps front end engineers deliver faster, more secure, more maintainable code that taps into the latest capabilities of the Web platform, which all adds up to the best possible customer experience. Cut down on travel time and expense, and invest a small fraction of your working year getting out in front of current trends.

Direction: the intersection of design, technology and big picture thinking

Last year we re-launched our Web Directions conference as Direction, to reflect the changes in our overall approach to delivering the best possible events to help you develop professionally. But, if Respond focuses on front end design, and Code on front end engineering, what does Direction focus on? Direction is about the bigger picture (just as it always was as Web Directions). Two days of keynote-style presentations that help you chart a way forward, think about medium term trends in technology, in user experience, in interaction design. Direction helps you think about where your the work you do, and your career will go over the next few years. The Web will always be at the heart of our events - including Direction - since the Web, we believe, will continue to be the medium for delivering the best possible user experiences in the great majority of cases. But as machine learning, AI and conversational interfaces impact on the sorts of experiences we deliver to our users, as computing power disseminates into almost every object, and as these and other developments affect business and society profoundly, we believe it's important to give deep consideration to these challenges and opportunities, not with breathless hype, but as we've always done, through the insights of people who spend their lives thinking about these things.
Our promise
We'll separate the hype of emerging trends in technology, design, and strategic thinking from actionable reality. We'll bring you deep thinkers who are working with these ideas and technologies, not simply taking about them. And we'll help you make the right decisions in harnessing the opportunities of a world that seems to be in a constant state of flux. Direction 16" ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Plan Your Professional Development for 2017" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(43) "plan-your-professional-development-for-2017" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-24 12:16:29" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-24 01:16:29" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7033" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#954 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6290) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-03-18 11:24:10" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-03-18 01:24:10" ["post_content"]=> string(1568) "At Web Directions, we've long been excited about animation on the Web, particularly animated user interfaces and experiences. We've featured a significant number of presentations on the topic, including two stellar ones in 2015, at Web Directions Code and at Web Directions itself. Today we feature one of those, by the awesome Rachel Nabors, 'The State of the Animation', from our front end engineering conference Code in 2015 (which is back in Sydney and Melbourne in July/August 2016). But, it's far more than just about the code, and relevant right across the team. So, set aside your lunch hour or some time on your commute or at the weekend to get your head around where animation is at right now on the Web. Interested in more like this? Our Respond Web Design conference is coming up in Sydney and Melbourne in April. Or just jump on our mailing list, a once a week roundup of great resources from us and around the Web!
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Some solutions for dealing with common Ajax related issues such as timeouts & loss of connectivity.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

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Some common client-side security issues and how to avoid them.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

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How you can use streams both for your benefit and for the benefit of your fellow developers.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

" ["post_title"]=> string(59) "Damon Oehlman - Streaming the web (it's not what you think)" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(33) "damon-oehlman-streaming-web-think" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2014-11-19 08:45:40" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-11-18 22:45:40" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "http://www.webdirections.org/?p=5893" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#958 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(5888) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "2" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2014-07-25 12:33:14" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2014-07-25 02:33:14" ["post_content"]=> string(455) "

Web browser security nerds have been really busy lately, with a lot of proposals, extensions and experiments to TLS (a.k.a. SSL) happening.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

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Introducing some of the new native data structures that are available in modern JavaScript

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

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Node.js takes asynchronous programming to a new level and has tracked the rise of new approaches to managing complex program flows.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

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Faster, more robust and more fun (web) apps.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

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We've entered the Ambient Computing Era and ECMAScript 6 is its dominant programming language.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

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Presentations about code

Podcasts, slides, videos and more

Calling All Speakers for Web Directions Code 2017

Last week, we opened registrations for the latest Web Directions Code conference, taking place in Melbourne on 3-4 August.

We’ve announced just two international keynote speakers (so far) and that’s partly because we’ve deliberately left room for some presentations by up and coming local speakers.

That could be you.

At Web Directions, a … Read more »

Video of the Week: The State of Front-End Testing – Alicia Sedlock

Alicia SedlockContinuing this week’s broad theme of maintaining your code and making sure it does what it’s supposed to do – preferably neither more nor less, our Video of the Week also comes from Code 16.

Alicia Sedlock took us … Read more »

Registrations Open for Code 17, First Speakers Announced

We have just opened registrations for Web Directions Code 17!

For those new to it, and to remind those who know it well, Code has evolved to be the premier conference in Australia focusing on JavaScript, front end HTML/CSS, devops, engineering, web-facing programming, security, performance … in short, code.

The last time … Read more »

The Big 2017 Events Reset

I want to share with you our updated plans for the rest of 2017, and into 2018.

Why are we changing the schedule?

Well, as you may know, my sister Rosemary (who runs Web Directions with me) and I are dealing with some serious family health problems that require us to rethink how best we … Read more »

Code as a Signal of Quality

For closer to 20 than 10 years, I’ve made the argument that the quality of the code of a website (which is relatively easy to assess, compared to any sort of binary application, where code is almost impossible to assess in any meaningful way) – whether it validates, its approach … Read more »

Plan Your Professional Development for 2017

Those of us who work in Web and the digital arena don’t have to be reminded that our fields are constantly updating. Whether it’s underlying technologies, or broad strategic practices, what was cutting edge last year is often common practice this year, and out of date the next.

Both in terms … Read more »

Rachel Nabors–The State of the Animation

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • March 18, 2016
  • Comments Off on Rachel Nabors–The State of the Animation

At Web Directions, we’ve long been excited about animation on the Web, particularly animated user interfaces and experiences. We’ve featured a significant number of presentations on the topic, including two stellar ones in 2015, at Web Directions Code and at Web Directions itself.

Today we feature one of those, by the … Read more »

Alex Mackey – Harden Up Your Ajax

Some solutions for dealing with common Ajax related issues such as timeouts & loss of connectivity.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Paul Theriault – Taking Frontend Security Seriously

Some common client-side security issues and how to avoid them.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Damon Oehlman – Streaming the web (it’s not what you think)

How you can use streams both for your benefit and for the benefit of your fellow developers.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Mark Nottingham – What’s Happening in Transport Layer Security (TLS)?

Web browser security nerds have been really busy lately, with a lot of proposals, extensions and experiments to TLS (a.k.a. SSL) happening.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Ben Birch – JavaScript Generators

Introducing some of the new native data structures that are available in modern JavaScript

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Rod Vagg – Embrace the Asynchronous

Node.js takes asynchronous programming to a new level and has tracked the rise of new approaches to managing complex program flows.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Alex Feyerke – Offline First

Faster, more robust and more fun (web) apps.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Allen Wirfs-Brock – ECMAScript 6, a Better JavaScript for the Ambient Web Era

We’ve entered the Ambient Computing Era and ECMAScript 6 is its dominant programming language.

And if this floats your boat, you need to get along to the Engineering Track at Web Directions 2014.

See the slides and hear the podcast »