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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 10:45am.

Session description

The average size of an adult human’s finger pad is 10-14mm. The average size of a cursor or stylus tip is 1-2mm. That fact alone means that designing native touchscreen apps is an entirely different thing than designing web, desktop, or even traditional mobile apps. This talk outlines the most important concepts, guidelines, and practices to keep in mind when designing with fingers and hands in mind. We’ll cover interaction zones (where it’s easiest for fingers to reach), touch targets (size and distance apart), kinesiology (how fingers can bend, move, and stretch), and signaling (how users can become aware of gestures).

About Dan Saffer

Photo of Dan SafferDan Saffer is an interaction designer and the author of two books: Designing Gestural Interfaces and Designing for Interaction. He is the co-founder and one of the principals at Kicker Studio, a design consultancy in San Francisco that does “interaction-infused” product design. Since 1995, Dan has designed devices, software, websites, and services that are currently used by millions every day. He speaks at conferences and teaches workshops on interaction design all over the world. He and his products have been in BusinessWeek, Fast Company, and Wired, and his design innovations have received several patents. Follow Dan on Twitter: @odannyboy
" ["post_title"]=> string(50) "Dan Saffer - Top Ten Things To Tackle Touchscreens" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(789) "

Photo of Dan SafferThe average size of an adult human’s finger pad is 10-14mm. The average size of a cursor or stylus tip is 1-2mm. That fact alone means that designing native touchscreen apps is an entirely different thing than designing web, desktop, or even traditional mobile apps. This talk outlines the most important concepts, guidelines, and practices to keep in mind when designing with fingers and hands in mind. We’ll cover interaction zones (where it’s easiest for fingers to reach), touch targets (size and distance apart), kinesiology (how fingers can bend, move, and stretch), and signaling (how users can become aware of gestures).

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 2:40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

We’ve heard it all before… prototype, prototype, prototype. It’s a standard step in almost any design process — but often the first step skipped in time and budget constrained projects. While prototyping is considered a standard step in any UX design process, it is an *essential* part of the mobile UX process. This talk will outline why prototyping is essential to part of the mobile UX process and how prolific prototyping is a necessary step for designers keen to grow the ruthless editing skills necessary to craft successful mobile experiences. This talk will also cover common and uncommon mobile prototyping tools, methods and techniques that you can apply to your project work.

About Rachel Hinman

Photo of Rachel HinmanRachel Hinman is a researcher, designer and a recognized thought leader in the mobile user experience field. Currently, Rachel is a Senior Research Scientist at the Nokia Research Center in Palo Alto, California. There she focuses on the research and design of emergent and experimental mobile interfaces and mobile experiences for emerging markets. Prior to joining Nokia, Rachel was an experience design director at Adaptive Path, and a mobile researcher and strategist for Yahoo’s mobile group. Rachel writes and speaks frequently on the topic of mobile research and design. She is the creative force behind the 90 Mobiles in 90 Days Project and her perspectives on mobile user experience has been featured in Interactions Magazine, BusinessWeek and Wired. She is currently writing a book entitled, “The Mobile Frontier: A Guide for Designing Mobile Experiences” with Rosenfeld Media. Expected publication is late 2011. Follow Rachel on Twitter: @Hinman
" ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Rachel Hinman - Mobile Prototyping Essentials" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(716) "

Photo of Rachel HinmanWe’ve heard it all before… prototype, prototype, prototype. It’s a standard step in almost any design process — but often the first step skipped in time and budget constrained projects. While prototyping is considered a standard step in any UX design process, it is an *essential* part of the mobile UX process. This talk will outline why prototyping is essential to part of the mobile UX process and how prolific prototyping is a necessary step for designers keen to grow the ruthless editing skills necessary to craft successful mobile experiences.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 11:45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

As browsers explode with new capabilities and migrate onto devices users can be left wondering, “what’s taking so long?” Learn how HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and the web itself conspire against a fast-running application and simple tips to create a snappy interface that delight users instead of frustrating them.

About Nicholas Zakas

Photo of Nicholas ZakasNicholas C. Zakas is principal front-end engineer for the Yahoo! homepage, a contributor to YUI, and an author. Nicholas has written Professional JavaScript for Web Developers, Professional Ajax, and High Performance JavaScript. He has also contributed a chapter to Steve Souders’ Even Faster Web Sites. Nicholas posts regularly at his blog as well as on YUI Blog. Follow Nicholas on Twitter: @slicknet
" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "Nicholas Zakas - Mobile Web Speed Bumps" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(474) "

Photo of Nicholas ZakasAs browsers explode with new capabilities and migrate onto devices users can be left wondering, “what’s taking so long?” Learn how HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and the web itself conspire against a fast-running application and simple tips to create a snappy interface that delight users instead of frustrating them.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 1:25pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

A new generation of touch devices have proven to be exciting playgrounds for app designers. And with every new product we create, we have the opportunity to offer the most clear and efficient experience for our users. Recent UI trends often lean to realistic, faithful representations of analog controls and features. These designs can offer advantages, but also come with their own set of hazards. In this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings. We’ll talk about things like mental models, innovation and usability as they relate to lifelike UI. Finally, Aaron will share some pragmatic guidelines to keep in mind as you build the next wave of mobile and touch apps.

About Aaron Weyenberg

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergA mixed breed designer/developer, Aaron’s career is built upon a unique blend of creative and technical sensibilities. He began twelve years ago leading interactive initiatives for Colorado’s top design agencies, delivering successful projects for a range of clients including HP, Spyder Active Sports and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. In 2004 he joined ESPN New Media where he provided instrumental leadership in an Art Director role. At ESPN he guided best practices, developed core UI components and designed pioneering real time game and scoring applications. Aaron currently serves as Creative Director for Fanzter, a lean and profitable New England based startup. His work has appeared on Smashing Magazine, Six Revisions, Ajax Rain and was awarded at the 27th annual Sports Emmys. Aaron’s academic background spans three fields of study at three different universities, settling into a B.S. in Scientific and Technical Communication from Michigan Tech. His offline hobbies involve learning about social psychology and human behavior, photography, and a quest to find the perfect iPod earphones. Follow Aaron on Twitter: @aweyenberg
" ["post_title"]=> string(37) "Aaron Weyenberg - Realistic UI Design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(523) "

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergIn this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings. We’ll talk about things like mental models, innovation and usability as they relate to lifelike UI. Finally, Aaron will share some pragmatic guidelines to keep in mind as you build the next wave of mobile and touch apps.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 1:25pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

While location-based mobile apps are becoming increasingly popular, they are still relatively new. Special considerations need to be made for battery life and handling large data sets of geolocated data. The good news is there are many services and technologies you can use to assist you in building mobile location-based apps. In this session, Aaron Parecki, co-founder of Geoloqi.com, shows you services you can leverage to do things like nearby business lookups, location-based triggers, nearest intersection queries, and more. Aaron also covers the location services available on the various mobile platforms as well as in HTML 5, and shares some insights on how to deal with battery life. The session concludes with some real-world use cases for real-time location such as turning on and off your lights in your house or notifying your boss if you’ll be late to work.

About Aaron Parecki

Photo of Aaron PareckiAaron Parecki is a Portland-based iPhone and PHP developer interested in solving practical problems with technology. In his free time, he enjoys geolocation, linguistics, and building home automation systems and IRC bots with a sense of humor. For the past 2½ years, he has been tracking and visualizing his location every 6 seconds. He created Geoloqi.com with Amber Case in an effort to help people connect in the real world. He has 11 years experience in web app development, database design, and server administration. Follow Aaron on Twitter: @aaronpk
" ["post_title"]=> string(27) "Aaron Parecki - Geolocation" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(459) "

Photo of Aaron PareckiWhile location-based mobile apps are becoming increasingly popular, they are still relatively new. Special considerations need to be made for battery life and handling large data sets of geolocated data. The good news is there are many services and technologies you can use to assist you in building mobile location-based apps.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 3:50pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

No one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. Argue about programming languages, memory management and reach all you want. There is one undeniable disadvantage that the mobile web faces that native apps don’t–over a decade of legacy code, cruft and entrenched organizational politics. But the web is essential. Even companies whose businesses are centered on native apps need web pages to sell those apps. We can demonstrate time and again that a web-based approach is a smart investment. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences? And most importantly, how should we be changing our web infrastructure, tools and workflow for the coming zombie apocalypse of devices.

About Jason Grigsby

Jason Grigsby PortraitJason Grigsby was one of the project leads on the Obama ’08 iPhone Application and helped design the user interface for the Wall Street Journal’s Blackberry application. Jason is a co-founder of Cloud Four, a small start-up focused on mobile web development. He founded and organizes Mobile Portland. Jason is currently co-authoring Head First Mobile Web for O’Reilly Publishing. The book will be available this winter. Follow Jason on Twitter: @grigs
" ["post_title"]=> string(69) "Jason Grigsby - Keynote: Native is Easy. Mobile Web is Freaking Hard!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(490) "

Jason Grigsby PortraitNo one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences?

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 14 4.15pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Today's web is being defined more than ever by buzzwords, catchphrases, fads and trends. Startups are being created for startups sake, standards are being hijacked by so-called "social media gurus," and investors are piling on one after another looking to hop on the next big wave. And we, the designers, developers and innovators actually building the web, are left to wonder if we're still in the drivers seat. During this brisk discussion we'll separate fads from the future, debate native apps versus the mobile web, take an honest look at the hype behind geo-location, then take a step back to ask ourselves where the web—and we ourselves—are going. Hold on, it's going to be a wild ride!

About Josh Williams

Josh Williams PortraitJosh Williams is CEO and co-founder of Gowalla, a mobile and Web service that gives people around the world a new way to communicate and express themselves through the everyday places and extraordinary settings they enjoy. Gowalla empowers everyone to capture and share their journey as they go while following the happenings of family and friends. Josh is responsible for building and growing the business while leading the product design team. Gowalla was launched in 2009 and is backed by notable investors including Greylock Partners, Alsop-Louie Partners, Founders Fund, and other prominent angel investors. Josh is a self-taught designer and artist who has been creating online for over 15 years. Josh loves mid-century modern design, architecture, skiing, snowboarding and longboarding. He lives in Austin, Texas with his wife and two young daughters. Follow Josh on Twitter: @JW
" ["post_title"]=> string(44) "Josh Williams - Keynote: Where are we going?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(455) "

Josh Williams PortraitDuring this brisk discussion we'll separate fads from the future, debate native apps versus the mobile web, take an honest look at the hype behind geo-location, then take a step back to ask ourselves where the web—and we ourselves—are going. Hold on, it's going to be a wild ride!

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 1.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

There is no denying that the Apple App Store is huge, but who wants to have to deal with Objective-C? Thankfully, technologies like PhoneGap and Sencha allow web developers to work in languages they know (HTML/CSS/JavaScript) while still making them look native. PhoneGap also allows us to port our apps to other platforms, like Android. This session will look at the mobile web development lifecycle from building a prototype in the browser, integration with the phone, app submission and some basic marketing tricks.

About Myles Eftos

Myles Eftos PortraitMyles is a Perth-based Web developer who feels as at home building INNER JOINS as he does calculating the specificity of CSS selectors. He has worked in all the major web languages, with his weapon of choice being Ruby on Rails. During his 8-years in the industry, working under the moniker of MadPilot Productions, he has worked with pretty much everyone in Perth. He started 220, a cooperative workspace in Leederville and currently has a position on the committee of the Australian Web Industry Association. Follow Myles on Twitter: @madpilot
" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Myles Eftos - Building mobile web apps" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(346) "

Myles Eftos PortraitThis session will look at the mobile web development lifecycle from building a prototype in the browser, integration with the phone, app submission and some basic marketing tricks.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 11.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

Phones with GPS are now widely available and the growing support for the JavaScript geolocation API means location based services aren't restricted to the realm of native applications. Now is the time to learn how to take advantage of this information and add provide your users with the best personal and contextual experience. This session will take you through building a location-based mobile app using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Including cross-platform techniques for figuring out where your users are, and providing graceful fallbacks options for devices that don't have geolocation support (or users that don't want to tell you exactly). You'll learn about geocoding to a physical address (and the other way around) and look at how to build a mobile-friendly map with local points of interest.

About Max Wheeler

Max Wheeler PortraitAn interaction designer with a passion for emerging technologies, Max believes the web should function as beautifully as it looks. He currently resides in Canberra where he works with Icelab, a media-agnostic design agency with a team of good people. In his spare time Max takes photographs, travels the world, and builds web applications that do useful things. His latest pet project is Decaf Sucks, a site for helping you to find the good cafés and avoid the bad ones. He also happens to be the current world champion in the sport of beach ultimate. Follow Max on Twitter: @makenosound
" ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Max Wheeler - Location, location, geolocation" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(639) "

Max Wheeler PortraitThis session will take you through building a location-based mobile app using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Including cross-platform techniques for figuring out where your users are, and providing graceful fallbacks options for devices that don't have geolocation support (or users that don't want to tell you exactly). You'll learn about geocoding to a physical address (and the other way around) and look at how to build a mobile-friendly map with local points of interest.

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Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 1.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Mainstream mobile devices are being loaded with sensors. These devices can be used to create experiences that are tailored, adaptive and responsive to the way people live and work. Location-awareness allows devices to respond to place, networked address books enable socially rich communication experiences, and motion and gestural sensors empower designers to respond to context of use. All these elements are creating a ’sensitive ecosystem’; mobile devices that adapt gracefully to context and use.

This presentation will explore some of the design and technology trends that are shaping design for mobile devices, show examples of devices and services that are starting to take advantage of these trends, then explain how designers need to rethink design problems to take advantage of this technological ground-shift.

About Gabriel White

Portrait of Gabriel WhiteGabriel is a seasoned interaction designer and world traveler. Currently Interaction Design Director at Punchcut in San Francisco, Gabriel was a Principal Designer at Frog Design, led design teams at Motorola China, visited Microsoft’s Research Lab in Beijing, and consulted in Australia.

With ten years’ experience in the design industry and a deep understanding of the mobile space, Gabriel is passionate about creating meaningful products and services that help improve people’s lives. He has written for ACM Interactions Magazine, and publishes regularly through his mobile design blog, Small Surfaces. Gabriel was the interaction design lead for Motorola’s MotoFone, a phone designed specifically for poor, non-literate people in developing countries.

" ["post_title"]=> string(48) "Gabriel White - Sensing context in mobile design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(1062) "

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 1.40pm.

Gabriel White PortraitMainstream mobile devices are being loaded with sensors. These devices can be used to create experiences that are tailored, adaptive and responsive to the way people live and work. Location-awareness allows devices to respond to place, networked address books enable socially rich communication experiences, and motion and gestural sensors empower designers to respond to context of use. All these elements are creating a ’sensitive ecosystem’; mobile devices that adapt gracefully to context and use.

This presentation will explore some of the design and technology trends that are shaping design for mobile devices, show examples of devices and services that are starting to take advantage of these trends, then explain how designers need to rethink design problems to take advantage of this technological ground-shift.

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Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 11.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

The release of Apple’s iPhone brings new opportunities for web sites and web apps on handheld devices, though not without its share of challenges and best practices.

Tim and Pete will look at the best examples out in the wild and share their experience creating iphone.news.com.au - one of Australia’s largest news sites, news.com.au, tailored to the iPhone.

About Pete Ottery

Portrait of Pete OtteryPete has been designing web sites for about 9 years. Having previously worked as the Head of Design at Fairfax Digital and Creative Director at Daemon, he is now working at News Digital Media as the Group Interface Designer. Recently he has been designing truelocal.com.au, careerone.com.au & iphone.news.com.au. He works directly with site owners and execs to help inform requirements and push product design boundaries. He is daily knee deep in photoshop concepts and html/css code.

About Tim Lucas

Portrait of Tim LucasTim Lucas, aka toolmantim, is a software developer and web technologist known in the Aussie web community for his involvement in events such as Work at Jelly, Webjam and the Sydney Ruby on Rails group. Tim’s been building connected software for as long as he can remember, recently helping craft the iphone version of news.com.au and the new VOIP platform vtalk. Tim combines his passion for quality with his human approach to software development as co-founder and senior developer at Agency Rainford, a web agency collaborating with brilliant individuals to create kick-ass solutions to problems that matter.

" ["post_title"]=> string(47) "Pete Ottery & Tim Lucas - Developing for iPhone" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(802) "

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 11.45am.

Tim Lucas Portrait Peter Ottery PortraitThe release of Apple’s iPhone brings new opportunities for web sites and web apps on handheld devices, though not without its share of challenges and best practices.

Tim and Pete will look at the best examples out in the wild and share their experience creating iphone.news.com.au - one of Australia’s largest news sites, news.com.au, tailored to the iPhone.

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A presentation given at at Web Directions User Experience, Melbourne Town Hall, May 16 2008.

Presentation slides

Session description

Historically the mobile web has been a terrible experience, but things are starting to change. Really! We are now at the point that the mobile web is becoming easier to access, both on-deck & off-deck, there's useful & tailored services out there, and killing some time on the train home doesn't cost more than your weekly train ticket. We'll check out the latest and greatest in the world of mobile web and what makes them different from the others. We will also cover the important things to keep in mind for making a better mobile web customer experience.

About Oliver Weidlich

Oliver Weidlich PortraitOliver draws on a background in psychology, experience in usability and understanding of mobile technology to identify key issues for client business strategy, and customers, and to recommend & design solutions through his consultancy Ideal Interfaces. He has consulted to clients such as Hutchison, Optus, Telstra, ninemsn, Orange, Holden, and Motorola.

He has a wide range of experience evaluating and improving the end-to-end customer experience with mobile devices, including 2G, 2.5G and 3G devices, portals, applications and content. He has conducted field research into future mobile usage and the interaction between the mobile device and other technologies.

Ideal Interfaces is a founding member of the AIMIA Mobile Content Industry Development Group and Oliver is playing a key role in the design and project management of the Australian Mobile Phone Lifestyle Index which looks at mobile content usage in the local market.

" ["post_title"]=> string(82) "Oliver Weidlich - The mobile web user experience - we're starting to get it right!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(804) "

A presentation given at at Web Directions User Experience, Melbourne Town Hall, May 16 2008.

Oliver Wiedlich PortraitHistorically the mobile web has been a terrible experience, but things are starting to change. Really! We are now at the point that the mobile web is becoming easier to access, both on-deck & off-deck, there's useful & tailored services out there, and killing some time on the train home doesn't cost more than your weekly train ticket. We'll check out the latest and greatest in the world of mobile web and what makes them different from the others. We will also cover the important things to keep in mind for making a better mobile web customer experience.

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A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 31 2008.

Presentation slides

Session description

Mobile technology is poised to revolutionize how we gather information. By 2010 half the population of the planet will have access to the internet through a mobile device, making the mobile web an essential part of our lives. Yet the mobile industry has few if any resources to help would-be mobile developers from diving in other than applied experience from within the industry.

Brian Fling dicusses the mobile ecosystem in Canada and abroad, how you go about developing an integrated mobile web strategy, mobile design and development principles and best practices, and most importantly, practical techniques and information to start creating mobile websites today.

About Brian Fling

Brian Fling Portrait

Brian Fling is a leader in interactive strategy and both the web and mobile fields. He has worked with several Fortune 500 companies to help design and develop their web and mobile experiences. Brian is a frequent speaker and author on the issues on mobile design, the mobile web and mobile user experience.

He has authored the dotMobi Mobile Web Developers Guide, the first free publication to cover mobile web design and development from start to finish. Brian also runs one of the largest online communities focused on mobile design.

When he isn’t discussing mobile, Brian serves as co-founder and Director of Strategy of Blue Flavor, an interactive agency based in Seattle USA.

" ["post_title"]=> string(47) "Brian Fling - Mobile web design and development" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(910) "

A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 31 2008.

Brian Fling Portrait

Mobile technology is poised to revolutionize how we gather information. By 2010 half the population of the planet will have access to the internet through a mobile device, making the mobile web an essential part of our lives. Yet the mobile industry has few if any resources to help would-be mobile developers from diving in other than applied experience from within the industry.

Brian Fling dicusses the mobile ecosystem in Canada and abroad, how you go about developing an integrated mobile web strategy, mobile design and development principles and best practices, and most importantly, practical techniques and information to start creating mobile websites today.

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A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 31 2008.

Session description

Since the advent of personal computing, we’ve been tied to one place — typically sitting at a desk, with a keyboard and mouse, and in isolation. Even the advent of the web and the wifi-enabled laptop hasn’t much changed this quarter century old paradigm. But with the rise of mobile phones and devices like the Nintendo Wii and PSP featuring first class web browsing, our experience of the web will change dramatically over the coming years. In this context, which design and user experience patterns and techniques we’ve developed over the last 15 years hold up? And… which break?

In this session, Dave Shea and John Allsopp consider the challenges we’ll face as the web devolves onto a myriad devices, and the web is “always on” wherever we are.

About John Allsopp

John Allsopp Portrait

Successful software developer, long standing web development speaker, writer, evangelist and expert, John has spent the last 15 years working with and developing for the web. As the head developer of the leading cross platform CSS development tool Style Master, and developer and publisher of renowned training courses and learning resources on CSS and standards based development, John is widely recognized as a leader in these fields.

As a presenter and educator, John speaks frequently at conferences around Australia and the world. His idiosyncratic blog Dog or Higher covers a broad range of subjects, particularly in technology and innovation, and is widely read and referenced.

About Dave Shea

Dave Shea Portrait

Dave Shea is the creator and cultivator of the highly influential web site csszengarden.com, and co-author of the recently-published Zen of CSS Design (New Riders, 2005).

The founder and design lead of Bright Creative in Vancouver, BC, Dave also writes for a large global audience of web designers and developers on his popular weblog, mezzoblue.com. His sites have won multiple awards, including Best of Show 2004 at the South by Southwest Interactive conference in Austin, TX.

He speaks internationally at design and technology industry conferences, on top of being an organizer of Web Directions.

" ["post_title"]=> string(92) "John Allsopp & Dave Shea – Where’s Your Web At? Designing for the Web Beyond the Desktop" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(1159) "

A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 31 2008.

John Allsopp Portrait Dave Shea Portrait Since the advent of personal computing, we’ve been tied to one place — typically sitting at a desk, with a keyboard and mouse, and in isolation. Even the advent of the web and the wifi-enabled laptop hasn’t much changed this quarter century old paradigm. But with the rise of mobile phones and devices like the Nintendo Wii and PSP featuring first class web browsing, our experience of the web will change dramatically over the coming years. In this context, which design and user experience patterns and techniques we’ve developed over the last 15 years hold up? And… which break?

In this session, Dave Shea and John Allsopp consider the challenges we’ll face as the web devolves onto a myriad devices, and the web is “always on” wherever we are.

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A presentation given at at Web Directions North, Vancouver, February 8, 2007.

Session Description

Interaction design is no longer limited to the web. The concept of user experience is being redefined as multiple delivery methods of social and business interaction merge into our lifestyles. As design migrates from the web to mobile devices we carry and interact with on a daily basis, our approach must also shift into cycles of design and research centered around the way people actually live.

In this enlightening session, design ethnographer and web veteran Kelly Goto discusses the evolution of Web, handheld, and product interfaces and their cultural impact. Learn how companies are utilizing ethnographic-based research to conduct rapid, immersive studies of people and their lifestyles to inform the usefulness and viability of interfaces both online and offline.

"h4 id="about">About Kelly Goto

Kelly Goto is currently a principal at Gotomedia, an online consultancy for user experience and interaction design, Kelly continues to focus on developing new techniques for collaborative development in digital media. With over 15 years of experience in the advertising, design and interactive industry, Kelly bridges the gap between utility and aesthetics.

Formerly an award-winning Creative Director at Idea Integration Kelly successfully managed the redesigns of many sites ranging from independent to corporate levels. In advertising and commercial design since the late 1980s, Kelly has acted as creative director, designer, and producer for many high-profile clients including KPMG Consulting, Compaq, IBM, Warner Bros., National Geographic, Adobe Corporation, Paramount Television, Macromedia Corp., and Sony Pictures. Kelly is the co-author of the highly acclaimed book Web Redesign: Workflow that Works.

" ["post_title"]=> string(36) "Kelly Goto - Designing for Lifestyle" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(874) "

A presentation given at at Web Directions North, Vancouver, February 8, 2007.

Interaction design is no longer limited to the web. The concept of user experience is being redefined as multiple delivery methods of social and business interaction merge into our lifestyles. As design migrates from the web to mobile devices we carry and interact with on a daily basis, our approach must also shift into cycles of design and research centered around the way people actually live.

In this enlightening session, design ethnographer and web veteran Kelly Goto discusses the evolution of Web, handheld, and product interfaces and their cultural impact. Learn how companies are utilizing ethnographic-based research to conduct rapid, immersive studies of people and their lifestyles to inform the usefulness and viability of interfaces both online and offline.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 10:45am.

Session description

The average size of an adult human’s finger pad is 10-14mm. The average size of a cursor or stylus tip is 1-2mm. That fact alone means that designing native touchscreen apps is an entirely different thing than designing web, desktop, or even traditional mobile apps. This talk outlines the most important concepts, guidelines, and practices to keep in mind when designing with fingers and hands in mind. We’ll cover interaction zones (where it’s easiest for fingers to reach), touch targets (size and distance apart), kinesiology (how fingers can bend, move, and stretch), and signaling (how users can become aware of gestures).

About Dan Saffer

Photo of Dan SafferDan Saffer is an interaction designer and the author of two books: Designing Gestural Interfaces and Designing for Interaction. He is the co-founder and one of the principals at Kicker Studio, a design consultancy in San Francisco that does “interaction-infused” product design. Since 1995, Dan has designed devices, software, websites, and services that are currently used by millions every day. He speaks at conferences and teaches workshops on interaction design all over the world. He and his products have been in BusinessWeek, Fast Company, and Wired, and his design innovations have received several patents. Follow Dan on Twitter: @odannyboy
" ["post_title"]=> string(50) "Dan Saffer - Top Ten Things To Tackle Touchscreens" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(789) "

Photo of Dan SafferThe average size of an adult human’s finger pad is 10-14mm. The average size of a cursor or stylus tip is 1-2mm. That fact alone means that designing native touchscreen apps is an entirely different thing than designing web, desktop, or even traditional mobile apps. This talk outlines the most important concepts, guidelines, and practices to keep in mind when designing with fingers and hands in mind. We’ll cover interaction zones (where it’s easiest for fingers to reach), touch targets (size and distance apart), kinesiology (how fingers can bend, move, and stretch), and signaling (how users can become aware of gestures).

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Presentations about mobile

Dan Saffer — Top Ten Things To Tackle Touchscreens

Photo of Dan SafferThe average size of an adult human’s finger pad is 10–14mm. The average size of a cursor or stylus tip is 1–2mm. That fact alone means that designing native touchscreen apps is an entirely different thing than designing web, desktop, or even traditional mobile apps. This talk outlines the most important concepts, guidelines, and practices to keep in mind when designing with fingers and hands in mind. We’ll cover interaction zones (where it’s easiest for fingers to reach), touch targets (size and distance apart), kinesiology (how fingers can bend, move, and stretch), and signaling (how users can become aware of gestures).

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Rachel Hinman — Mobile Prototyping Essentials

Photo of Rachel HinmanWe’ve heard it all before… prototype, prototype, prototype. It’s a standard step in almost any design process — but often the first step skipped in time and budget constrained projects. While prototyping is considered a standard step in any UX design process, it is an *essential* part of the mobile UX process. This talk will outline why prototyping is essential to part of the mobile UX process and how prolific prototyping is a necessary step for designers keen to grow the ruthless editing skills necessary to craft successful mobile experiences.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Nicholas Zakas — Mobile Web Speed Bumps

Photo of Nicholas ZakasAs browsers explode with new capabilities and migrate onto devices users can be left wondering, “what’s taking so long?” Learn how HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and the web itself conspire against a fast-​running application and simple tips to create a snappy interface that delight users instead of frustrating them.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Aaron Weyenberg — Realistic UI Design

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergIn this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings. We’ll talk about things like mental models, innovation and usability as they relate to lifelike UI. Finally, Aaron will share some pragmatic guidelines to keep in mind as you build the next wave of mobile and touch apps.

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Aaron Parecki — Geolocation

Photo of Aaron PareckiWhile location-​based mobile apps are becoming increasingly popular, they are still relatively new. Special considerations need to be made for battery life and handling large data sets of geolocated data. The good news is there are many services and technologies you can use to assist you in building mobile location-​based apps.

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Jason Grigsby — Keynote: Native is Easy. Mobile Web is Freaking Hard!

Jason Grigsby PortraitNo one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences?

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Josh Williams — Keynote: Where are we going?

Josh Williams PortraitDuring this brisk discussion we’ll separate fads from the future, debate native apps versus the mobile web, take an honest look at the hype behind geo-​location, then take a step back to ask ourselves where the web—and we ourselves—are going. Hold on, it’s going to be a wild ride!

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Myles Eftos — Building mobile web apps

Myles Eftos PortraitThis session will look at the mobile web development lifecycle from building a prototype in the browser, integration with the phone, app submission and some basic marketing tricks.

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Max Wheeler — Location, location, geolocation

Max Wheeler PortraitThis session will take you through building a location-​based mobile app using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Including cross-​platform techniques for figuring out where your users are, and providing graceful fallbacks options for devices that don’t have geolocation support (or users that don’t want to tell you exactly). You’ll learn about geocoding to a physical address (and the other way around) and look at how to build a mobile-​friendly map with local points of interest.

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Gabriel White — Sensing context in mobile design

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 1.40pm.

Gabriel White PortraitMainstream mobile devices are being loaded with sensors. These devices can be used to create experiences that are tailored, adaptive and responsive to the way people live and work. Location-​awareness allows devices to respond to place, networked address books enable socially rich communication experiences, and motion and gestural sensors empower designers to respond to context of use. All these elements are creating a ’sensitive ecosystem’; mobile devices that adapt gracefully to context and use.

This presentation will explore some of the design and technology trends that are shaping design for mobile devices, show examples of devices and services that are starting to take advantage of these trends, then explain how designers need to rethink design problems to take advantage of this technological ground-​shift.

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Pete Ottery & Tim Lucas — Developing for iPhone

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 11.45am.

Tim Lucas Portrait Peter Ottery PortraitThe release of Apple’s iPhone brings new opportunities for web sites and web apps on handheld devices, though not without its share of challenges and best practices.

Tim and Pete will look at the best examples out in the wild and share their experience creating iphone​.news​.com​.au — one of Australia’s largest news sites, news​.com​.au, tailored to the iPhone.

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Oliver Weidlich — The mobile web user experience — we’re starting to get it right!

A presentation given at at Web Directions User Experience, Melbourne Town Hall, May 16 2008.

Oliver Wiedlich PortraitHistorically the mobile web has been a terrible experience, but things are starting to change. Really! We are now at the point that the mobile web is becoming easier to access, both on-​deck & off-​deck, there’s useful & tailored services out there, and killing some time on the train home doesn’t cost more than your weekly train ticket. We’ll check out the latest and greatest in the world of mobile web and what makes them different from the others. We will also cover the important things to keep in mind for making a better mobile web customer experience.

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Brian Fling — Mobile web design and development

A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 31 2008.

Brian Fling Portrait

Mobile technology is poised to revolutionize how we gather information. By 2010 half the population of the planet will have access to the internet through a mobile device, making the mobile web an essential part of our lives. Yet the mobile industry has few if any resources to help would-​be mobile developers from diving in other than applied experience from within the industry.

Brian Fling dicusses the mobile ecosystem in Canada and abroad, how you go about developing an integrated mobile web strategy, mobile design and development principles and best practices, and most importantly, practical techniques and information to start creating mobile websites today.

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John Allsopp & Dave Shea – Where’s Your Web At? Designing for the Web Beyond the Desktop

A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 31 2008.

John Allsopp Portrait Dave Shea Portrait Since the advent of personal computing, we’ve been tied to one place — typically sitting at a desk, with a keyboard and mouse, and in isolation. Even the advent of the web and the wifi-​enabled laptop hasn’t much changed this quarter century old paradigm. But with the rise of mobile phones and devices like the Nintendo Wii and PSP featuring first class web browsing, our experience of the web will change dramatically over the coming years. In this context, which design and user experience patterns and techniques we’ve developed over the last 15 years hold up? And… which break?

In this session, Dave Shea and John Allsopp consider the challenges we’ll face as the web devolves onto a myriad devices, and the web is “always on” wherever we are.

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Kelly Goto — Designing for Lifestyle

A presentation given at at Web Directions North, Vancouver, February 8, 2007.

Interaction design is no longer limited to the web. The concept of user experience is being redefined as multiple delivery methods of social and business interaction merge into our lifestyles. As design migrates from the web to mobile devices we carry and interact with on a daily basis, our approach must also shift into cycles of design and research centered around the way people actually live.

In this enlightening session, design ethnographer and web veteran Kelly Goto discusses the evolution of Web, handheld, and product interfaces and their cultural impact. Learn how companies are utilizing ethnographic-​based research to conduct rapid, immersive studies of people and their lifestyles to inform the usefulness and viability of interfaces both online and offline.

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