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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Let’s admit it, the tools for writing CSS aren’t very advanced. For the most part, the people who write tools don’t know about CSS and the people who know about CSS don’t write tools. Quite a conundrum! In this session, you’ll learn about good tools that can make development faster and maintenance easier. We’ll also talk a bit about where we can go from here. What tools do we need as sites are becoming more and more complex? We need to get beyond tools whose primary goal is to avoid hand-coding and realize that, as our techniques for writing CSS become more powerful, our tools can too! Session will include:
  • Validators
  • Preprocessors
  • Finding dead rules
  • Linting
  • CSS3 gradient tools
  • Performance measurement tools
  • Unit testing

About Nicole Sullivan

Photo of Nicole SullivanNicole is an evangelist, front-end performance consultant, CSS Ninja, and author. She started the Object-Oriented CSS open source project, which answers the question: how do you scale CSS for millions of visitors or thousands of pages? She also consulted with Facebook and the W3C, and is the co-creator of Smush.it, an image optimization service in the cloud. She is passionate about CSS, web standards, and scalable front-end architecture for large commercial websites. She co-authored Even Faster Websites and blogs at stubbornella.org. Follow Nicole on Twitter: @stubbornella" ["post_title"]=> string(33) "Nicole Sullivan - CSS Power Tools" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(267) "

Photo of Nicole SullivanIn this session, you’ll learn about good tools that can make CSS development faster and maintenance easier.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Computers are increasingly being held in the hand rather than sitting atop lap or desk. We now have to consider how our products will work underneath a finger instead of a mouse cursor. Increasingly, too, those products are being delivered as native applications, capable of fully exploiting device capabilities. That has ramifications not only for the way those projects get built, but also how we structure the businesses that support them. In this session, Michael Honey and Tim Riley answer the question “web or native?” from business, product design and development perspectives. They cover the current state of web technology on modern devices and compare it to what’s available through native development platforms. They’ll look at web, native and hybrid strategies successfully employed by Australian and international businesses, and share their own stories as mobile and web developers. Finally, they’ll offer practical guidance on picking a strategy for web or native development that best suits your needs — as either a developer or a client. Tim and Michael are two of the partners behind Icelab, an Australian design and development studio. They’ve trod both the web and native paths through their client work, such as interactive touchscreens for museum exhibits, online photo galleries and mobile tour guides, and also their own projects, like Decaf Sucks, a coffee review community available on the web (optimised for both desktops and smartphones) and as a native iPhone app.

About Michael Honey

Photo of Michael HoneyMichael founded Icelab after a career as creative director and later, interactive director in an agency environment. He has fifteen years’ experience in design for screen, print, video and exhibition spaces, and has expertise in writing, programming, direction and post-production. He is an experienced coder, with a particular interest in algorithmic animation and datavisualisation. He is also experienced in the development of diagrammatic animations for cultural, engineering, scientific and architectural clients. Michael’s interests include architecture, urbanism, and the environment. Follow Michael on Twitter: @michaelhoney

About Tim Riley

Photo of Tim RileyTim is a partner at Australian design and development studio Icelab, where he builds excellent web and mobile applications using Ruby on Rails, JavaScript, Cocoa, and occasionally out of popsicle sticks. On alternate days he runs Decaf Sucks, an online community for coffee reviews, and RentMonkey, which contains the greatest
on the Internet. Tim is an active participant in the Australian web and iOS communities, as a regular speaker at the Sydney Ruby on Rails meetings, organiser of the Canberra Ruby Crew, and part of the Canberra Cocoaheads chapter. Tim loves coffee and hates gluten. Follow Tim on Twitter: " ["post_title"]=> string(76) "Michael Honey & Tim Riley - Web or native? Smart choices for smartphone apps" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(446) "

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

The application of web accessibility guidelines in a holistic manner across all roles of a web team continues to encounter resistance. This is often due to a lack of resources and knowledge, or no sense of relevancy in certain web roles. While there is solid support of the guidelines by accessibility activists and many front-end developers, a large percentage of other web practitioners in non-technical roles do not know how to integrate accessible design practices into their daily work, despite wanting to. By re-categorising accessibility guidelines into role-based groupings, such as visual design, content writing and information architecture, guidelines become more accessible to inexperienced web practitioners across a broad range of web roles. The application of accessibility guidelines then becomes more integrated and holistic, thereby reducing project timelines and costs while increasing the overall accessibility of a site from initial design stages. This method enables practitioners to apply skills specific to their role to a narrow range of accessibility guidelines particular to their area of expertise. For example, the visual designer would create a design and evaluate colour contrast before submitting the design to the development team. Likewise, an interaction designer would consult with the Javascript specialist to ensure the menu design satisfies relevant accessibility guidelines.

About Lisa Herrod

Photo of Lisa HerrodLisa is the Director and Principal Consultant at Scenario Seven, an Inclusive Design Consultancy based in Sydney. With 15 years experience on the web, the past 10 years of her work has centred on design research, usability, accessibility and inclusive strategies. Lisa is best known for her role based approach to web accessibility, which has seen the re-categorisation of WCAG checkpoints into a user-centred, practitioner-focused grouping for content developers, visual designers, developers and user experience professionals. Scenario Seven specialises in creating accessible, inclusive design strategies that integrate holistically with traditional user research practices. This includes anything from requirements gathering to the review of design documentation (functional specs, wireframes & visual designs), user research and WCAG compliance. We design for diversity. Follow Lisa on Twitter: @scenariogirl" ["post_title"]=> string(92) "Lisa Herrod - Accessibility for web teams: Recategorising WCAG 2 using a role-based approach" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(314) "

Photo of Lisa HerrodThis method enables practitioners to apply skills specific to their role to a narrow range of accessibility guidelines particular to their area of expertise.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Natalie and Simon launched the first version of Lanyrd.com while on honeymoon in Casablanca. As the site took off, they realised their side project was destined to become something much bigger. This talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-week proof of concept to a full-fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

About Natalie Downe

Photo of Natalie DowneNatalie co-founded Lanyrd on her honeymoon with her husband Simon. Before co-founding a startup, she worked as a senior client-side engineer at Clearleft in Brighton, UK. Today, she juggles leading design, client-side engineering and UX on the project with building the company. If Natalie had any time for hobbies, she would enjoy pottery, yoga, writing and flying her kite. Follow Natalie on Twitter: @Natbat

About Simon Willison

Photo of Simon WillisonSimon is a co-founder of Lanyrd, and co-creator of the Django web framework. Prior to diving in to the world of entrepreneurship, Simon built crowdsourcing and database journalism projects for the Guardian newspaper in London. Simon is responsible for all of the server-side code on Lanyrd, unsurprisingly written with Django. He is also obsessed with Zeppelins, and hopes one day to build one. Follow Simon on Twitter: @simonw" ["post_title"]=> string(69) "Natalie Downe & Simon Willison - Lanyrd: From side project to startup" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(620) "

Photo of Natalie DownePhoto of Simon WillisonThis talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-week proof of concept to a full-fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Change is never a smooth process. How do know when disruption is useful and how do you cope with the feedback on it? Recently news.com.au, a national news website with large numbers of daily visitors, underwent a major upgrade which tore down existing and perhaps “expected” ways of presenting news. At the heart of the redesign was a desire for change that motivated and challenged every aspect of the team’s design thinking and process. In this co-piloted session Simon and Scott will fly you over the territories of change they encountered on the project, ones common to many redesign projects. They’ll descend through the experiences that came out of the redesign: fundamentals like stakeholders, requirements and their process for user experience architect and designer working side by side. Sprinkled with some of the twitter and facebook feedback the project received, they’ll touch down on the sticky issues of dealing with feedback and how to suck it up and utilise passionate user and stakeholder feedback.

About Scott Byrant

Photo of Scott BryantScott Bryant is a Senior Experience Architect working on online and cross platform news media and classifieds, most recently for news.com.au within the User Standards and Innovative Technology Team for News Digital Media. He spends his time working across product, design and technology teams utilising design and research to create engaging user experiences for news media. His career began as a visual artist before working in university and local government libraries, and finally into new media. He completed two Masters Degrees, in Media Art and Information Studies (while working as a Project Manager, Content Producer and IA). Upon returning from the US working on the Ask Jeeves innovative search interface he concentrated on User Experience, He continues to lecture casually in information and interaction design at the University of Technology, Sydney. Follow Scott on Twitter: @ScotTheLot

About Simon Wright

Photo of Simon WrightSimon Wright is the Art Director of news.com.au, leading the design and front-end development team. He’s responsible for the brand’s design and development across all digital platforms, and also works closely with journalists on new ways to tell stories online. As someone who’s passionate about design, the web, media and well-designed chairs, being a part of a news website’s a near perfect fit (if it was possible to do this while climbing up a rockface, he’d never leave). In a previous life Simon was based in Perth and wore the many hats of small business, mostly the propeller-topped one of designer/front-end dev and sometimes the dull beige hat of The Guy Who Does The Finance. Follow Simon on Twitter: @diversionary" ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Scott Bryant & Simon Wright - Designing for change and disruption" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(423) "

Photo of Scott BryantPhoto of Simon WrightChange is never a smooth process. How do know when disruption is useful and how do you cope with the feedback on it?

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

More and more as front-end developers we are presented with new challenges, with the explosion of the mobile web it has created a whole new territory. How do we test the vast array of devices out there? And what tools can help us make this a painless experience? Testing web apps on mobile devices is a new challenge not yet fully explored. Let’s brush over the beginnings of web application testing and debugging and dive into current solutions for remote debugging. In this session we’ll cover what developers and browser vendors are doing to help tackle this problem, including some of the tools available to use today, and how some of these tools work internally and what the future may hold.

About Ryan Seddon

Photo of Ryan SeddonRyan Seddon is a Senior Front-end Developer from Melbourne Australia who has an unnatural obsession with JavaScript and the many places it runs. He also loves to tinker with any new web technology he can get his hands on and loves diving into specs and code to figure out more. In his spare time he’s either playing basketball, writing for his blog thecssninja.com or committing code to github. Follow Ryan on Twitter: @ryanseddon" ["post_title"]=> string(40) "Ryan Seddon - Remote debugging landscape" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(267) "

Photo of Ryan SeddonHow do we test the vast array of devices out there? And what tools can help us make this a painless experience?

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

After a lost decade in the wilderness, JavaScript is starting to change and evolve. We’ll look at CoffeeScript, a little language that compiles into JavaScript, providing concise ways to to write many common JavaScript patterns. We’ll cover syntactic and semantic pain points, polyfills, sugar, and how you can start experimenting with your own flavor of JS.

About Jeremy Ashkenas

Photo of Jeremy AshkenasJeremy Ashkenas is part of the Interactive News team at the New York Times, as well as the lead developer of DocumentCloud, helping news organizations analyze and publish the primary source documents behind the news. He works on CoffeeScript, Backbone.js, Underscore.js, Docco, Jammit, and Ruby-Processing, among other opensource projects. Follow Jeremy on Twitter: @jashkenas" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "Jeremy Ashkenas - A Cup of CoffeeScript" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(393) "

Photo of Jeremy AshkenasAfter a lost decade in the wilderness, JavaScript is starting to change and evolve. We’ll look at CoffeeScript, a little language that compiles into JavaScript, providing concise ways to to write many common JavaScript patterns.

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Web Directions @media 2011, London, May 26th 11:45m.

Presentation slides

Additional resources and background information are available at Addy's website.

Session description

Modern JavaScript development often has to address a number of different concerns ranging from the use of architectural patterns such as MVC to improve code organisation, through to JavaScript templating, cross-​​browser storage, routing/​bookmarking, script loading, feature detection and more. In this talk, JavaScript developer and jQuery Core Bug Triage & Docs team member Addy Osmani discusses tools that can simplify your development process significantly.

About Addy Osmani

Photo of Addy OsmaniAddy Osmani is a popular JavaScript Blogger and a senior independent developer based in London, England. He is also a member of the jQuery Bug Triage and Front-​​end teams where he assists with community updates, releases and bugs. Addy’s passion lies in helping spread knowledge about JavaScript and jQuery best practices, coding techniques and open-​​source projects in the community. He achieves this through numerous free online talks, articles and resources which he releases each month. For more on Addy’s work, check out his official website AddyOsmani​.com for tutorials, jQuery​.com for his community updates and magazines such as .NET for his thoughts and commentaries. Follow Addy on Twitter: @addyosmani
" ["post_title"]=> string(56) "Addy Osmani - Tools for jQuery Application Architecture " ["post_excerpt"]=> string(322) "

Photo of Addy OsmaniIn this talk, JavaScript developer and jQuery Core Bug Triage & Docs team member Addy Osmani discusses tools that can simplify your development process significantly.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 10:45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

Developers have long been able to use an array of debugging, profiling and other testing tools to ensure application quality and performance. More recently, web developers have started to rely on increasingly sophisticated tools to help test their web sites and applications. But particularly in the mobile space, when developing sophisticated applications with web technologies, testing presents significant challenges. Ross Boucher, one of the developers of Objective-J, the Cappuccino web application framework, the visual development tool Atlas, and 280 slides knows a thing or two about testing sophisticated applications developed using web technologies. In this session, he’ll share some of those secretes, and help you better test and debug your applications.

About Ross Boucher

Photo of Ross BoucherRoss Boucher is co-founder of 280 North, the organization behind 280 slides and the popular Cappuccino and Atlas frameworks. At 280 North, he splits his time between server and client-side code, including the text system in 280 Slides. He has a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from USC. After graduating, he worked as an engineer at Apple on the iTunes Store. His team was responsible for music recommendations, charting, and search. Ross is currently working with his colleagues to create tools that will help everyone build rich applications. Follow Ross on Twitter: @boucher
" ["post_title"]=> string(63) "Ross Boucher - Quality Control: Testing and debugging your apps" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(578) "

Photo of Ross BoucherDevelopers have long been able to use an array of debugging, profiling and other testing tools to ensure application quality and performance. More recently, web developers have started to rely on increasingly sophisticated tools to help test their web sites and applications. But particularly in the mobile space, when developing sophisticated applications with web technologies, testing presents significant challenges.

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Web Directions USA 2010, Loews Atlanta Hotel, September 24 1.55pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Agile teams work in short iterations and deliver working software—that means coded, tested, documented, and if the customer decides the time is right, ready to go out the door. Teams work on features in tiny slices based on prioritized user stories, avoiding big up front design. But without a design phase, where does UX and UI fit? Esther will share strategies for evolving UI design as the software grows, keeping UI designers in the loop and helping everyone on the team be a better designer (cause they think already are).

About Esther Derby

Esther Derbyr PortraitEsther Derby works with individuals, teams, and organizations to improve their ability to deliver valuable software. Esther is recognized as a leader in the human-side of software development, including management, organizational change, collaboration, building teams, and retrospectives. She’s been a programmer, systems manager, project manager, and internal consultant. She currently runs her own consulting firm, Esther Derby Associates, Inc., in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Esther has an MA in Organizational Leadership, is the author of over 100 articles and co-author of Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great and Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management. At the moment, she’s working on a book about managing in team-based organizations. She’s a founder of the AYE Conference and is serving her second term as a board member for the Agile Alliance. Follow Esther on Twitter: @estherderby
" ["post_title"]=> string(29) "Esther Derby - Agile meets UI" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(361) "

Esther Derbyr PortraitEsther will share strategies for evolving UI design as the software grows, keeping UI designers in the loop and helping everyone on the team be a better designer (cause they think already are).

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Web Directions USA 2010, Loews Atlanta Hotel, September 24 10.10am.

Presentation slides

Session description

Remote research can raise the quality and lower the costs of your user research efforts; using a combination of surveys, video, screensharing, and phone, you can connect with a much broader range of users than you could using traditional lab-based usability tests, while using resources more efficiently than you would doing contextual research. In this workshop-style talk, Juliette Melton will cover recruiting sources, technology tools, and caveats you might not have thought of, including managing time zones and participant distraction. We will also address pros and cons of increasingly popular non-scripted research services.

About Juliette Melton

Juliette Melton PortraitJuliette Melton is a user experience researcher and design strategist based in San Francisco. Her background in web development and product management gives her a practical perspective on how to conduct effective user experience research. She advocates building products that delight users while supporting organizational realities. Juliette holds a master’s in education from the Technology, Innovation, and Education program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education where she focused on developing models for innovative networked learning applications. She runs Deluxify, a boutique UX consultancy, writes about her various projects at juliemelton.com, and makes lots of terrariums. Follow Juliette on Twitter: @j
" ["post_title"]=> string(68) "Juliette Melton - Remote research: Running effective remote studies " ["post_excerpt"]=> string(456) "

Juliette Melton PortraitIn this workshop-style talk, Juliette Melton will cover recruiting sources, technology tools, and caveats you might not have thought of, including managing time zones and participant distraction. We will also address pros and cons of increasingly popular non-scripted research services.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 10.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

Web standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don't always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we'll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before. We'll explore techniques for deciding what client technologies to use on your projects, how to drive the adoption of newer techniques and how not to leave your audience behind. We'll even talk about how to make all of this possible with Internet Explorer in the room.

About Tatham Oddie

Tatham Oddie PortraitTatham Oddie is a technical strategist and roaming consultant. For the third year in a row he is a recipient of the Microsoft-issued "Most Valuable Professional" award, and a regular presenter and participant at conferences and industry groups throughout Australia, New Zealand and North America. His business experience includes the launch of a successful creative agency, a fashion retail and PR business, and is now focussed on the development of Tixi - a niche ticketing agency. Follow Tatham on Twitter: @tathamoddie
" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Tatham Oddie - Practicing Web Standards in the Large" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(568) "

Tatham Oddie PortraitWeb standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don't always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we'll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 14 2.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

By now we all know that the web is not a publication - that it's a living, evolving thing. But a lot of content I see still appears to be 'published' once and then left alone. This talk is about what happens after content is published. We'll talk about how to:
  • decide what to create in the first place (and what the best format is)
  • identify which content types need to be left alone, and which need to be looked after
  • revive existing content and give it a second wind
  • check your content is still working for its readers
  • put it to sleep when it is time
  • put a process in place so you can do this yourself and with distributed content creators
We'll also discuss how this varies depending on your industry, size of site and type of content.

About Donna Spencer

Donna Spencer PortraitDonna’s a freelance information architect, interaction designer and writer. That’s a fancy way of saying she plans how to present the things you see on your computer screen, so that they’re easy to understand, engaging and compelling. Things like the navigation, forms, categories and words on intranets, websites, web applications and business systems. She’s been doing this professionally since 2002, is a regular speaker at Australian and international events and has just completed her third book. Follow Donna on Twitter: @maadonna
" ["post_title"]=> string(63) "Donna Spencer - Keeping your content alive from cradle to grave" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(404) "

Donna Spencer PortraitBy now we all know that the web is not a publication - that it's a living, evolving thing. But a lot of content I see still appears to be 'published' once and then left alone. This talk is about what happens after content is published.

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Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 8 9.10am.

Session description

The long run to the turn of the millennium got us preoccupied with conclusions. The Internet is finally taken for granted. The iPhone is finally ubiquitous computing come true. Let’s think not of ends, but dawns: it’s not that we’re on the home straight of ubicomp, but the beginning of a century of smart matter. It’s not about fixing the Web, but making a springboard for new economies, new ways of creating, and new cultures. The 21st century is a participatory culture, not a consumerist one. What does it mean when small teams can be responsible for world-size effects, on the same playing field as major corporations and government? We can look at the Web - breaking down publishing and consuming from day zero - for where we might be heading in a world bigger than we can really see, and we can look at design - playful and rational all at once - to help us figure out what to do when we get there.

About Matt Webb

Matt Webb PortraitMatt Webb is CEO of the design shop Schulze & Webb, which has a special focus on the social life of stuff. Projects include material prototypes for Nokia, Web strategy for the BBC, and an electronic puppet that brings you closer to your friends. Matt speaks on design and technology, is co-author of Mind Hacks - cognitive psychology for a general audience - and if you were to sum up his design interests in one word, it would be “politeness.” He can be found at interconnected.org and in London.

Photo credit Tom Coates

Follow Matt on Twitter: @genmon
" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Matt Webb - Opening keynote: Escalante" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(1130) "

Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 8 9.10am.

Matt Webb PortraitThe long run to the turn of the millennium got us preoccupied with conclusions. The Internet is finally taken for granted. The iPhone is finally ubiquitous computing come true. Let’s think not of ends, but dawns: it’s not that we’re on the home straight of ubicomp, but the beginning of a century of smart matter. It’s not about fixing the Web, but making a springboard for new economies, new ways of creating, and new cultures. The 21st century is a participatory culture, not a consumerist one. What does it mean when small teams can be responsible for world-size effects, on the same playing field as major corporations and government? We can look at the Web - breaking down publishing and consuming from day zero - for where we might be heading in a world bigger than we can really see, and we can look at design - playful and rational all at once - to help us figure out what to do when we get there.

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Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 9 11.45am.

Presentation slides (synced with audio)

Session description

Infrastructure and service costs are always a priority for any business, whether client-side or agency-side, especially now when we’re all trying to be particularly spend-efficient. A cloud technology can comprise infrastructure (Amazon’s S3, Google Apps for Domain), software services (Salesforce.com, Google Docs) and less tangible application services such as APIs (Facebook Connect, Google Friend Connect, Google Maps, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, etc). Cloud services change the way a business or campaign can operate, increasing flexibility, taking less time to deploy and introducing superb cost efficiencies so that we can redirect finances to where they’ll really pay for us - in innovation, experimentation and planning ahead. With these opportunities, however, come challenges around data and platform security, change management and who “owns” the platform and data you are using.

About Andrew Fisher

Andrew Fisher PortraitAndrew Fisher is the Technology Director for Citrus, an award winning digital marketing agency. Andrew has been involved in developing innovative digital solutions for businesses across Australia and Europe for the likes of Sportsgirl, Borders, Victoria Racing Club for Citrus and previously for Nintendo, CRAI, Mitsubishi and peoplesound. He’s been solving real business issues for diverse clients using cloud technologies and specialises in helping organisations combine the right technologies together in the most effective manner. Follow Andrew on Twitter: @ajfisher

" ["post_title"]=> string(31) "Andrew Fisher - Cloud computing" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(587) "

Andrew Fisher PortraitCloud services change the way a business or campaign can operate, increasing flexibility, taking less time to deploy and introducing superb cost efficiencies so that we can redirect finances to where they’ll really pay for us - in innovation, experimentation and planning ahead. With these opportunities, however, come challenges around data and platform security, change management and who “owns” the platform and data you are using.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Let’s admit it, the tools for writing CSS aren’t very advanced. For the most part, the people who write tools don’t know about CSS and the people who know about CSS don’t write tools. Quite a conundrum! In this session, you’ll learn about good tools that can make development faster and maintenance easier. We’ll also talk a bit about where we can go from here. What tools do we need as sites are becoming more and more complex? We need to get beyond tools whose primary goal is to avoid hand-coding and realize that, as our techniques for writing CSS become more powerful, our tools can too! Session will include:
  • Validators
  • Preprocessors
  • Finding dead rules
  • Linting
  • CSS3 gradient tools
  • Performance measurement tools
  • Unit testing

About Nicole Sullivan

Photo of Nicole SullivanNicole is an evangelist, front-end performance consultant, CSS Ninja, and author. She started the Object-Oriented CSS open source project, which answers the question: how do you scale CSS for millions of visitors or thousands of pages? She also consulted with Facebook and the W3C, and is the co-creator of Smush.it, an image optimization service in the cloud. She is passionate about CSS, web standards, and scalable front-end architecture for large commercial websites. She co-authored Even Faster Websites and blogs at stubbornella.org. Follow Nicole on Twitter: @stubbornella" ["post_title"]=> string(33) "Nicole Sullivan - CSS Power Tools" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(267) "

Photo of Nicole SullivanIn this session, you’ll learn about good tools that can make CSS development faster and maintenance easier.

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Presentations about production

Podcasts, slides, videos and more

Nicole Sullivan – CSS Power Tools

Photo of Nicole SullivanIn this session, you’ll learn about good tools that can make CSS development faster and maintenance easier.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Michael Honey & Tim Riley – Web or native? Smart choices for smartphone apps

Photo of Michael HoneyPhoto of Tim RileyIn this session, Michael Honey and Tim Riley answer the question “web or native?” from business, product design and development perspectives. See the slides and hear the podcast »

Lisa Herrod – Accessibility for web teams: Recategorising WCAG 2 using a role-based approach

Photo of Lisa HerrodThis method enables practitioners to apply skills specific to their role to a narrow range of accessibility guidelines particular to their area of expertise.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Natalie Downe & Simon Willison – Lanyrd: From side project to startup

Photo of Natalie DownePhoto of Simon WillisonThis talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-week proof of concept to a full-fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Scott Bryant & Simon Wright – Designing for change and disruption

Photo of Scott BryantPhoto of Simon WrightChange is never a smooth process. How do know when disruption is useful and how do you cope with the feedback on it?

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Ryan Seddon – Remote debugging landscape

Photo of Ryan SeddonHow do we test the vast array of devices out there? And what tools can help us make this a painless experience?

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Jeremy Ashkenas – A Cup of CoffeeScript

Photo of Jeremy AshkenasAfter a lost decade in the wilderness, JavaScript is starting to change and evolve. We’ll look at CoffeeScript, a little language that compiles into JavaScript, providing concise ways to to write many common JavaScript patterns.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Addy Osmani – Tools for jQuery Application Architecture

Photo of Addy OsmaniIn this talk, JavaScript developer and jQuery Core Bug Triage & Docs team member Addy Osmani discusses tools that can simplify your development process significantly.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Ross Boucher – Quality Control: Testing and debugging your apps

Photo of Ross BoucherDevelopers have long been able to use an array of debugging, profiling and other testing tools to ensure application quality and performance. More recently, web developers have started to rely on increasingly sophisticated tools to help test their web sites and applications. But particularly in the mobile space, when developing sophisticated applications with web technologies, testing presents significant challenges.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Esther Derby – Agile meets UI

Esther Derbyr PortraitEsther will share strategies for evolving UI design as the software grows, keeping UI designers in the loop and helping everyone on the team be a better designer (cause they think already are).

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Juliette Melton – Remote research: Running effective remote studies

Juliette Melton PortraitIn this workshop-style talk, Juliette Melton will cover recruiting sources, technology tools, and caveats you might not have thought of, including managing time zones and participant distraction. We will also address pros and cons of increasingly popular non-scripted research services.

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Tatham Oddie – Practicing Web Standards in the Large

Tatham Oddie PortraitWeb standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don’t always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we’ll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before.

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Donna Spencer – Keeping your content alive from cradle to grave

Donna Spencer PortraitBy now we all know that the web is not a publication – that it’s a living, evolving thing. But a lot of content I see still appears to be ‘published’ once and then left alone. This talk is about what happens after content is published.

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Matt Webb – Opening keynote: Escalante

Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 8 9.10am.

Matt Webb PortraitThe long run to the turn of the millennium got us preoccupied with conclusions. The Internet is finally taken for granted. The iPhone is finally ubiquitous computing come true. Let’s think not of ends, but dawns: it’s not that we’re on the home straight of ubicomp, but the beginning of a century of smart matter. It’s not about fixing the Web, but making a springboard for new economies, new ways of creating, and new cultures.

The 21st century is a participatory culture, not a consumerist one. What does it mean when small teams can be responsible for world-size effects, on the same playing field as major corporations and government? We can look at the Web – breaking down publishing and consuming from day zero – for where we might be heading in a world bigger than we can really see, and we can look at design – playful and rational all at once – to help us figure out what to do when we get there.

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Andrew Fisher – Cloud computing

Andrew Fisher PortraitCloud services change the way a business or campaign can operate, increasing flexibility, taking less time to deploy and introducing superb cost efficiencies so that we can redirect finances to where they’ll really pay for us – in innovation, experimentation and planning ahead. With these opportunities, however, come challenges around data and platform security, change management and who “owns” the platform and data you are using.

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