object(WP_Query)#502 (51) { ["query"]=> array(1) { ["category_name"]=> string(4) "blog" } ["query_vars"]=> array(64) { ["category_name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["error"]=> string(0) "" ["m"]=> string(0) "" ["p"]=> int(0) ["post_parent"]=> string(0) "" ["subpost"]=> string(0) "" ["subpost_id"]=> string(0) "" ["attachment"]=> string(0) "" ["attachment_id"]=> int(0) ["name"]=> string(0) "" ["static"]=> string(0) "" ["pagename"]=> string(0) "" ["page_id"]=> int(0) ["second"]=> string(0) "" ["minute"]=> string(0) "" ["hour"]=> string(0) "" ["day"]=> int(0) ["monthnum"]=> int(0) ["year"]=> int(0) ["w"]=> int(0) ["tag"]=> string(0) "" ["cat"]=> int(1) ["tag_id"]=> string(0) "" ["author"]=> string(0) "" ["author_name"]=> string(0) "" ["feed"]=> string(0) "" ["tb"]=> string(0) "" ["paged"]=> int(0) ["meta_key"]=> string(0) "" ["meta_value"]=> string(0) "" ["preview"]=> string(0) "" ["s"]=> string(0) "" ["sentence"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["fields"]=> string(0) "" ["menu_order"]=> string(0) "" ["embed"]=> string(0) "" ["category__in"]=> array(0) { } ["category__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["category__and"]=> array(0) { } ["post__in"]=> array(0) { } ["post__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["post_name__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__and"]=> array(0) { } ["tag_slug__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag_slug__and"]=> array(0) { } ["post_parent__in"]=> array(0) { } ["post_parent__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["author__in"]=> array(0) { } ["author__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=> bool(false) ["suppress_filters"]=> bool(false) ["cache_results"]=> bool(true) ["update_post_term_cache"]=> bool(true) ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=> bool(true) ["update_post_meta_cache"]=> bool(true) ["post_type"]=> string(0) "" ["posts_per_page"]=> int(15) ["nopaging"]=> bool(false) ["comments_per_page"]=> string(2) "50" ["no_found_rows"]=> bool(false) ["order"]=> string(4) "DESC" } ["tax_query"]=> object(WP_Tax_Query)#239 (6) { ["queries"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["terms"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(4) "blog" } ["field"]=> string(4) "slug" ["operator"]=> string(2) "IN" ["include_children"]=> bool(true) } } ["relation"]=> string(3) "AND" ["table_aliases":protected]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(21) "wp_term_relationships" } ["queried_terms"]=> array(1) { ["category"]=> array(2) { ["terms"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(4) "blog" } ["field"]=> string(4) "slug" } } ["primary_table"]=> string(8) "wp_posts" ["primary_id_column"]=> string(2) "ID" } ["meta_query"]=> object(WP_Meta_Query)#240 (9) { ["queries"]=> array(0) { } ["relation"]=> NULL ["meta_table"]=> NULL ["meta_id_column"]=> NULL ["primary_table"]=> NULL ["primary_id_column"]=> NULL ["table_aliases":protected]=> array(0) { } ["clauses":protected]=> array(0) { } ["has_or_relation":protected]=> bool(false) } ["date_query"]=> bool(false) ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Term)#139 (17) { ["term_id"]=> int(1) ["name"]=> string(4) "Blog" ["slug"]=> string(4) "blog" ["term_group"]=> int(0) ["term_taxonomy_id"]=> int(1) ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["parent"]=> int(0) ["count"]=> int(753) ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["term_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["cat_ID"]=> int(1) ["category_count"]=> int(753) ["category_description"]=> string(0) "" ["cat_name"]=> string(4) "Blog" ["category_nicename"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_parent"]=> int(0) } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) ["request"]=> string(342) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 15" ["posts"]=> &array(15) { [0]=> object(WP_Post)#237 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6690) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-12-23 10:53:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-12-22 23:53:18" ["post_content"]=> string(10969) "Let's face it. For many, 2016 hasn't been the best year ever: the loss of several beloved cultural icons, currents of political decision-making that didn't feel like steps forward, pessimistic news on the climate change front ... But it's well known that cultivating a mindset of gratitude is overwhelmingly positive and healthy. And so, at the end of this seemingly endless and at least personally exhausting year (one in which I turned 50), I wanted to reflect on some really positive things that we managed to achieve at Web Directions in 2016, some of them long standing ambitions.

A brand new conference – Transform

Since the beginning, many of our audience have come from the government sector, and over the years we've run workshops, and even entire conferences focused on Government and the Web. But with the significant changes happening around the World in Government service delivery, kick-started in many ways by the UK's GDS, and more recently taken up with gusto here in Australia with the establishment of the DTO (now DTA), we decided it was time for a conference focusing on this area. So in May (timed originally to avoid the election season planned later in the year, but which ended up being held over the period of the conference) we brought together pioneers in government service deliver from the US, UK, NZ and around Australia for Transform. A great success, we're back again at the end of March, again as a single day, single track conference, plus a day of optional workshops.

Not one but two new publications – Scroll and Wrap

When you go to a conference, you're almost invariably handed a program. Well designed, printed at quite some expense, and largely useless except as a memento. So this year we decided to do something about that. For each of our major events, we produced an edition of Scroll, a beautifully designed magazine that features in depth interviews and profiles of speakers, as well as articles of relevance to our industry. You can only get a physical copy by coming to our events, but you can download all three editions from 2016 now. But that's not all. I've long wanted to ensure that attendees obtained the most possible benefit from coming to our events, benefit that lasted far longer than the experience of being there. To this end, we've for several years made videos of presentations available to attendees, but this year we started Wrap, a detailed writeup for each session from each conference, once again beautifully designed by the folks at Handle. Even if you missed the conferences, there's real value in Ricky Onsman's detailed write-up of every session from every conference this year. Grab your copies today!

Expanding Respond to two days (and two cities)

In 2013, Web Directions was two conferences: Web Directions in Sydney, and Code in Melbourne. In 2017, we'll run four major conferences, two of which (Respond and Code) will take place in three cities. The growth began in 2014, when we ran Respond as a "popup" conference–a single day in Sydney focusing on the specific challenges around front end design. This year we not only extended it to two days, it also travelled to Melbourne, where its audience was even a little bit bigger than the Sydney audience!

Expanding Code to two cities

Hand in hand with this, we took Code on the road, to Sydney as well as the city where it started in 2012, Melbourne. And as I mentioned, we'll be also heading to Brisbane with Code in 2017.

Reframing, refocusing and rebranding our major conference, Direction

Part of all this was a really significant rethink about Web Directions, the conference that started it all for us way back in 2006. For many years, this was essentially our entire business. At one point in 2012, it grew to four tracks, a genuine behemoth. But in time we came to realise that focus is the key to great events. So, by 2015 we'd pared Web Directions back to two tracks, one focused on design and big ideas, and one focused on engineering–a combination of the sort of thins we cover in Respond and Code. But programming multiple developer conferences in Australia (Code, then three months or so later, the Web Directions engineering track) was really hard. So this year our goal with all our events was to integrate and coordinate them better, to allow each event to specifically focus on an area of practice, and to allow experts in specific areas of that field to dive deeply into their area of expertise. Which left us with something of a challenge for the the rebranded Direction (I wrote about the choice of name, and how direction is quite different from directions, earlier in the year). Many events of similar nature around the world might best be characterised as a "celebration" of the Web. But celebrations of their nature look backwards, rather than forwards. And there's only so much celebrating one can do. So we definitely wanted Direction to maintain significant professional relevance. What we felt was that for really established professionals, particularly with more of a design focus, or with an overall strategic focus within a team or organisation, the people shaping the direction (geddit?) their product, or company or organisation is taking, there isn't always a lot on offer. So, we developed Direction as precisely this–a way of keeping track of developing technologies (like this year VR and AR), ideas, and practices. It's more for the sort of person who might call themselves a designer but, to be honest, design sensibility and - dare I say it - "design thinking" are central to successful products, companies, organisations, and so in a way Direction is for a much wider audience. Judging by the responses (including via anonymous survey), this rather large leap into the unknown went a long way to achieving what we'd hoped, and we're already lining up some extraordinary speakers for 2017.

Speaker development

One day, I'll try to write up our vision for what it is we actually do, or at least strive to do here at Web Directions. But in essence it is to help people within our industry develop their skills and capabilities. One area we've focused on recently is helping people develop their presentation and public speaking skills. As part of this, we've worked with local groups like Women Who Code to hold workshops specifically for women to help develop these skills.

Developing an insurance offering

As if we didn't have enough to do with all we'd bitten off, we're also developing an idea I've been working on for quite some time: great value, fully featured insurance for freelance/contract workers as well as smaller agencies offering Web design and development services in Australia. That might seem significantly different from much that we do here, but it definitely aligns with our mission to help build the industry and, most importantly, its professionals. Starting at $39 a month, paid monthly, and with no lock-in, it will be available in early 2017. If you're keen, sign up to our mailing list to be the first to know, or drop us a line with any questions.

Refining our visual identity

In mid 2015 we started on a major overhaul of our visual identity, our Web sites, and more or less all our communications. While it's yet to have hit our main web site (that's coming), the sites for each of our "products" have been significantly overhauled. This is all part of a transition for us toward a focus on professional and industry development, as our industry transitions from peripheral, an adjunct to marketing or - in some ways even worse - IT, to an integral part of the organisations we work in or with.

2017

I've already foreshadowed much of what we'll be doing in 2017, something of a consolidation year for us, after the year of hectic innovation that was 2016. We'll be:
  • * holding Transform, our government service delivery focused conference in March in Canberra
  • * holding Respond, our front end design conference in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane in May
  • * holding Code, our front end development conference in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane in late July and early August
  • * holding Direction, our product/experience/design and big ideas conference in November
As mentioned, we'll also be launching our Public & Product Liability and Professional Indemnity insurance offering early in the year, we'll be producing Scroll and Wrap to go with each event, and maybe we even have one or two other things up our sleeve.

Thank You

As we wrap up a huge, and at times challenging year, there's a few folks we'd really like to thank. Ricky Onsman has come to almost every conference, workshop, and event we've ever run, including traipsing all the way to Vancouver for Web Directions North. This year, he's come on board as Managing Editor for all our content, and allowed us to achieve some of these things we'd been planning for many years. Michael and Georgina Schepis at Handle Branding, whom we found almost by accident last year, and who've helped deliver amazing experiences with Scroll and Wrap, the signage at our events, and much more. If you're looking for folks to do brand design, signage, print or any sort of communications design, you really should get in touch with them. Simon Wright has been coming along to our events since the early days, and has been our Art Director for the last couple of years as we've transitioned from a couple of folks doing almost everything themselves (including at times making people coffee at our events), to the sort of company we aspire to become. A huge part of this has been to develop the visual identity of the company, something Simon has done with great aplomb. Public Speaking for Life is two fantastic people, Sarah Ewen and Tarek Said, who run workshops, training and a community meetup in Sydney around developing public speaking skills. They've helped us deliver some fantastic training for speakers, and you should really look at what they have to offer. We also want to thank our dozens of conference speakers, writers for Scroll and Wrap, our event volunteers and, above all, you - the folks who've attended our conferences, workshops and events." ["post_title"]=> string(14) "2016 in Review" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(14) "2016-in-review" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-01-13 12:08:10" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-01-13 01:08:10" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6690" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#236 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6683) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-12-16 12:24:08" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-12-16 01:24:08" ["post_content"]=> string(57047) "There's little doubt technology has a diversity challenge. There's a lot of conversation about why that might be - although less about what we might do about it, particularly in terms of specific action. Aubrey Blanche from Atlassian spends her life thinking about this, and developing programs and practices to address it. In this highly regarded session from this year's Direction conference, Aubrey went into detail about what they have done - specific actionable practices - to help achieve some quite remarkable outcomes. Want to help increase the diversity of your organisation? Start here.   Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.



Transcript

- - Alright so we're gonna do this without slides today, which is probably great for you because I am not a visual designer.

I am in fact an organizational designer.

So thank you for the lovely introduction, I am actually quite thrilled to be here today.

It's not often that I get to talk at, sort of, design conferences and things like that, so it's really fun to have a new type of audience.

But I am Atlassian's global head of diversity and inclusion, and what that means, my dad often says what do you do, why do you get paid? It's okay, right, like I get that question at least twice a week.

But my job is to help Atlassian more effectively attract, recruit, retain, and develop people from traditionally under-represented groups.

Or put another way, to design a company that creates equal access to opportunity for every person who walks through our doors.

And the reason that that's important is because it turns out that companies are actually quite bad at this, and the tech industry itself is actually really bad at it, and doesn't necessarily know why.

But it turns out that understanding why that happens means that we can design to overcome it.

In the same way that we're talking about what online harassment looks like, we can design organizations to mitigate the things that don't work, and to encourage the types of behaviors and decision-making that does.

So the place I like to start here, is to think about why.

So why don't we see women in technology, in the same way that we see them in a population.

They make up half of planet earth, roughly.

Probably a little bit less if you think about non-binary folks in there as well.

But it turns out there's a few hypotheses about why this is.

Things like women don't like science and math.

They're just not interested in computers.

And it turns out that those are not valuable hypotheses because the data doesn't show us that's true.

So it turns out that there are points along what I call the talent funnel, from the time that folks are tiny children, that actually cause women to opt out of working in technology.

And that there are things that we can do to overcome them.

So, alright here's my other slides.

I'm sorry, these are the wrong slides, but that's okay.

So one of the first things that I hear about the tech industry, and the sort of belief that we have about ourselves is that tech is a meritocracy, and I'm here to tell you that is not true.

It actually turns out, research shows that when we have a belief, that the systems that we engage in, that is they are meritocratic, the more that we believe that, the less likely they are to be meritocratic, and the less likely we are to believe claims of bias and discrimination.

It's something we call the paradox of meritocracy.

An amazing researcher, Castilla and Benard, published a study earlier this year, I absolutely, it's called The Paradox of Meritocracy, check it out.

But what they showed is that when companies added the ideas of meritocracy into their company mission statements, that individuals actually engaged in more biased behavior.

So the first thing we have to do is reframe meritocracy as something that exists, and embrace a growth mindset about it.

Say it is something that we can build.

It is something that we can achieve, and it is something that we can do together.

So starting all the way back, I wanna talk about why girls opt out.

And it starts in 1985.

So it turns out about that time, personal computers started being marketed to people.

And it turns out that they were mostly marketed to boys and men.

Which means that parents bought their sons computers.

That gave boys a 10 year head start.

So in the eighties, you saw in the US that more than 40% of computer science degrees were given to women.

And over the last 20 years, we've seen women's representation in engineering and STEM fields begin to come to parity with men, except for computer science.

And so, we can't assume that fundamental computer science concepts are uninteresting to women because we have historical data that they're not.

In fact, the first computer programmer was a women.

Grace Hopper invented COBOL.

Hollywood star Hedy Lamarr actually invented the technology that now powers Bluetooth and WiFi, right.

We have a hidden history of women in computing.

And it turns out that when that advertising came out, it not only gave boys a 10 year head start on learning hacking and how computers worked and things like that, but it also made girls believe that computers were not a thing for them.

Socialization is incredibly powerful.

It motivates the choices we make, even if there aren't strict rules about what we're allowed to choose, it turns out that, well, horses have to bolt to that kind of influence.

So you see that.

You see girls that are suddenly stereotyped as not.

We have stereotypes about who techies are.

We see them as this sort of lone wolf person, maybe hacking in a basement somewhere.

And there are certainly those people, and if they find that great, that's awesome, but it turns out that there are lots of other types of people in the world.

And by painting this sort of monolithic idea of who tech is, if someone doesn't identify with that type of a lifestyle, they're gonna opt out of that career.

So the advertising, the way we've done it, I don't have the slide for you today, but if you can Google it, Newsweek just did a cover last year, where they show the titans of Silicon Valley, and every single one of them was a white man.

And I love white men, they're great, my dad is one of them.

Right, lots more in my family too.

I'm actually mixed race, so I'm like, the left half of me is white.

It was a joke, right, bad jokes.

But imagine what that means.

You're implicitly telling people, and our brains are very plastic.

So we actually start to learn rules, like what types of people are allowed to do things.

And so this media and this advertising environment, and the stereotypes that we rely on, the fact that we talk about beer and pizza instead of things like comprehensive healthcare and flexible work environments.

Right? All of those things are great.

So we need to change the way that we advertise and the way that we brand, so that we paint a broad inclusive picture of who tech is, what tech is, and who it can be.

Because that's gonna help to opt in.

That's a long term play.

Next, talking about bias.

So unconscious bias is like the buzzword right now in diversity and inclusion.

Which makes me really excited because I am a perpetually recovering social scientist, so anyone that actually wants to talk about psychology is really exciting to me.

But it turns out that unconscious bias affects us in so many ways, it's crazy.

I could throw up 15 studies in a couple of minutes for you about the way that it causes us to actually evaluate the skills of women in technical roles less, compared to their male counterparts.

This is true for black individuals, for people who are Latino, disabled.

And so what happens, is that women actually face higher barriers to entry.

My personal research actually shows that when we removed names from coding screens that a company I was at previously, when the names were there, men were 1/3 more likely to get a phone screen interview when we controlled for the quality of the code.

And we controlled for it by using the same code and putting a different name on it.

Right, identical down to the character.

And when we rebuilt our internal tech systems to actually get rid of that identifying information, that gender based pattern disappeared.

Right, that's really really powerful.

And, so thinking about the ways that we conduct people processes, the way that we evaluate it, and how we design those environments to limit the application of the bias that we have as human beings is incredibly critical.

Because it turns out that if you're at a tech company, you probably know that you're in a war for talent right now.

It is really hard to find technical people.

I think someone told me yesterday that there are one million cyber security jobs in the world that there is no one to fill.

Just today.

And that's becoming even more critical.

And that's just one specialty.

So, the third thing is culture.

So there are lots and lots of research and hypotheses about why women leave.

Because it turns out that by 10 years into their career in technology, 56% of women opt out.

The comparable statistic for men is 17%.

And these women often don't leave technical roles, but they go to other industries where they can do technical jobs.

And there are hypotheses around raising children, and things like that, but it turns out that when you actually ask the women why they left, they will tell you it is a culture that they didn't feel like they could thrive in, and where they weren't going to get oppurtunities to succeed.

That's pretty great right, this is amazing survey tool we have, just ask people what their opinions are.

So it turns out that, you know, even me, I'm a 28 year old woman in tech, like I don't wanna work in a frat house.

And a lot of start ups in Silicon Valley, that's the culture that they create.

But it turns out that culture is malleable, so that's another problem that we need to address if we're trying to address that gap.

So they're kinda the broad things, that's the doom and gloom portion of the talk.

Now we're gonna talk about what Atlassian is doing about that.

So it turns out that a lot of these changes that we make are also not expensive.

So doing smart diversity and inclusion is about smart organizational design that gives your company better talent, but also it is a more efficient process for everyone.

So that's really great.

I guess before I talk about exactly why we've made all of those changes, I wanna talk about why diversity, why it's valuable.

'Cause I do a lot of this coaching.

So what we see, is that when we have diverse teams, they perform better.

So people with cognitive diversity, or difference with perspective and backgrounds, when they work together, their individual IQs actually go up.

So those diverse teams are greater than the sum of their parts.

Companies that are more diverse are significantly more likely to out-perform their more homogeneous peers.

Mackenzie estimates that gender diverse companies are 15% more likely to have greater financial performance, and ethnically or culturally diverse companies are 35% more likely to be in that top quintile of financial performance.

So if you have any equity in your companies, diversity is good for your bank account.

It turns out also that diversity is the mechanism that drives a host of other things that we care about as a business.

So, people on diverse teams are happier, they're more productive, they're more innovative, they perform better on logical and creative tasks.

Companies have greater retention, individuals have greater emotional commitment to colleagues.

Right, like who's all in for that? Me, for sure.

And so when I think about it, diversity is not the end goal, it is the mechanism by which we achieve all of this greatness.

And, that's important because it's not something we inherently seek out as individuals.

We as people have something called strong like-me bias.

I usually think, you know, we like people like ourselves, like our friends.

But it turns out that being around people like ourselves all the time doesn't make us great.

So now talking a little bit about Atlassian.

So I came on board about a year and a half ago, so June 1st of last year.

And I kind of said, what is reality today? And reality was, there was an incredible group of people that are really other-oriented, really passionate, and wanted to know how to make a difference, but nothing was built yet.

And it turns out that that was great because it meant that we could build things the right way the first time.

And so we had to decided where we wanted to start because Rome was not built in a day, and you cannot completely change the composition of your workforce in a year because firing half your employees do to that seems like a really stupid business decision.

So we said let's start with our graduates in Sydney because one, it's a very controlled process, we recruit all of our graduates at the same time, they start at the same time.

So we're in this lucky phase, we're about to open our recs for the summer for grads to start in January.

Let's look at everything we're doing, what we're doing wrong, and why.

So the first part of that project was utterly terrifying.

We pulled, we had just opened our recs for our intern and grad class in January, and we had exactly zero female applicants.

It is really really hard to hire women when you don't have any applications from them.

Right, like, radical honesty here.

And so we said, okay, this is, we are literally starting at ground zero.

What are we gonna do about it? And so we said well there are lots of hypotheses about what's going on, wrong.

Why don't we have any inbound applications? What kind of sourcing are we doing? So we started at the basics.

We know that women have something that we call the confidence gap.

So that means when women and men are equally qualified, women are actually less likely to rate themselves highly.

Like women will not call themselves experts, they call themselves specialists.

Right, all the women in the room are like, yeah totally, that's me.

Me too, like I freak out about the word expert.

I'm trying to embrace it, do that behavioral modeling.

But, we said okay, maybe there's a confidence gap, maybe they just don't feel comfortable applying to Atlassian.

So we sent our recruiters out to the women in tech groups at USydney, at UNSW, and other unis where we know that they have strong computer science programs.

We hosted breakfasts, and we literally just had our recruiters talk to the women about the fact that in their experience, women tend to opt out of applying even when we think that they have strong applications that are very competitive.

That's free, it's easy.

But it turns out that women sometimes need that encouragement because throughout their lives, they've been told that they're less capable at computer science, which means they're more susceptible to when they fail once, to fall prey to that confirmation bias.

So when they put in their application, they wanna really make sure that it's gonna land, and they're going to guarantee they can be successful.

We wanted to interrupt that pattern, and say throw your hat in the ring.

A lot of you maybe have heard the statistic for job applications that men will apply when they have about 30% of the requirements, and women will apply when they have about 80% of the requirements.

Actual research that's done, and I can tell you that that is true, I have stopped doing that.

I applied for my job having two out of the nine requirements on the list, look they gave me the job.

Shocking still.

But so that's a silly problem, it's an information problem, and it's a free problem to solve.

So in addition to going out and coaching these women that we thought would be fantastic additions to Atlassian, we also said we need to re-position our employer branding.

We need to make sure that passive people, who are encountering information about Atlassian, can see themselves there, and can see a value in applying.

So we did a complete overhaul of our careers site.

We looked at the images we were using and the language, and it wasn't about, like we have snacks and pizza, and, you know, beer on Fridays and that's great, wine if you're not into beer.

And we kept that stuff, but we also brought out things like, we're a really collaborative work environment.

We talk about things like flexible work policies.

We made sure that women of all cultural backgrounds were depicted in the images that are on our website.

Because we wanted people to opt in, to feel like they were gonna be included, and like they might have a place at Atlassian when they clicked on that button.

The next thing we did was fundamentally changed our job ads.

So we know that the drop out rate for people from minority backgrounds is significant after you have more than five requirements on your jobs.

And that most companies write their job ads, is this like wish list of a unicorn person who doesn't actually exist.

Stop doing that.

It's really really bad for you.

It turns out that the more that you do that, the less quality candidates you get as passive applications.

So counter-intuitively, it works against.

So we actually instituted new rules.

We started using an amazing machine learning tool called Textio to both surface high impact, positive words, and remove gender bias from the language in our job descriptions.

It turns out that women don't tend to associate themselves with words like "rockstar", or "guru", or "ninja", and also in our experience, rockstars come in at 11 and are really terrible at building software.

So we remove stuff like that.

We don't say "killer perks", we say "collaborative work environment." Why? Because that's actually more true about what we do, how we work at Atlassian.

So, all of our grad jobs now only have three requirements, and all of them are skills-based, and not experience-based.

So rather than saying something like, "Bachelors degree in computer science," we say "experience and ability of building high quality software." Why? Because it turns out that things like what uni you went to, there's a lot of structural factors that tell you whether you're gonna get a computer science degree.

In fact, in the United States, the number one predictor of whether you attend a top 25 university is how much money your parents make.

It has nothing to do with your skills and abilities.

Obviously our education system is a little bit different over there.

But we recognize that even for people, we've seen folks from the LGBTI community who are more likely to have family issues.

They're less likely to have the formal degrees and certifications that traditional job ads have on them.

And again, we know that if they're requirements that people can't meet, that's not great.

So, why not? Think about the ability that you want the person to have, not the very narrow way that one person might acquire that skill.

I've seen the other things is experience in a start up environment.

Well it turns out there's really strong selection effects of who actually makes it into a start up in the first place.

So why don't you say instead, "ability to work in an ambiguous and collaborative "environment at high speed with changing priorities." Right? That's actually what you mean.

So just say what you mean.

Because there's a lot of people, you know, IBM has this really amazing design lab right, where it's kind of start up-y.

And so maybe someone's at IBM, which doesn't necessarily fit with people who might enjoy working in a high growth company, but it turns out that they might have the skills that are an amazing addition to your team.

So be specific and be thoughtful.

Think of the requirements on your job ads as the lowest bar to entry.

The basic things that I need you to be able to do on day one when you sit down at your desk, and everything else is coachable and learnable.

Because you will get incredibly different set of candidates.

So that was a big thing for us.

Just changing our job ads.

That sounds really basic right? So that's the top of the funnel.

And then, it went into well, we know that unconscious bias affects the way that we evaluate people.

And we know that our process may not be perfect.

So how do we remove the bias? Or how do we make our evaluation processes as objective as they possibly can be? And, so we start at the top.

What's the first impression we have of a candidate? The first thing that we do for every candidate is they receive a coding test.

And because my research shows that when humans grade those coding tests, we're subject to bias.

We just had a computer grade it.

Just spits our a raw score for us.

And we came up with a measure of what score a candidate needed in order to move forward to the phone screen portion of our interview.

It turns out that it also takes a ton of work off of our recruiters.

It means that we can access more talent more quickly, and that we can really bring, sort of those high quality folks into the funnel when we start investing those people resources in it, which is pretty great.

Then we said well what about our evaluation processes? So we did a bunch of research about what types of interviewing, and what types of structures of interviews actually results in more objectivity, and what problems we expected.

We expected minorities to experience perhaps more in interview environments than people who have majority group identities.

So we actually re-designed our entire evaluation process to use structured behavioral interviewing.

So if you've read Laszlo Bock's book, who's the former VP of People at Google, he talks about the fact that one, interviewing is hard, and people are terrible at it.

We are really really bad at evaluating whether people are good at anything.

As human beings, so we're all in this together.

But structured behavioral interviewing is, has I think it's like R equals point three four, something like that, predictive power, on whether someone is gonna be successful.

And so what structural behavior interviewing is, is that we have a structured set of questions for each role, and we make sure that each candidate is give the same set of questions.

We try to hire for different facets, so we look at things like technical ability, but also their leadership potential.

And we ejected culture fit from our vocabulary, and from our evaluation processes.

And the reason for that is, culture fit is actually just this weird intractable moras of unconscious bias.

So, that's no good for anybody.

So again, structural behavioral interviewing, and then we changed to something we call values fit.

So, talking about the bad side of culture fit, it turns out that research shows that when we have something in common with the candidate, even if it's completely orthogonal to the skills required for a role, we tend to have this halo effect of them.

Maybe they're just wearing a blue jacket that we really like.

Or research in the financial industry has shown that for people who play the same sport as their interviewer in college, they're four times more likely to be described as a culture fit.

I am totally into rowing and I watch it in the Olympics, but it does not help me create beautiful products.

So...right? Everyone's like yeah, you're saying such sensible things.

And so what we did is we said that's stupid.

At Atlassian, if you know anything about our company, or you can Google it and please do, we have a set of five company values.

And a lot of companies talk about that, but I can tell you I am still quite shocked at how much people refer to them in the middle of their days.

It's like, well I don't, I'm trying to balance this, so our company values are open company no bullshit, it's one of the reasons why I'm actually here talking to you all, is because everything we learn about our people and the way that we build teams, everyone else should know.

You should learn from our failures and our successes, so you can take them and build brilliant, beautiful things with you.

The second is build with heart and balance.

So we believe in bringing your whole self to work, and balancing those things.

That's everything from your work-life balance to the composition of our teams.

And then the third is, and pardon my language, don't fuck the customer.

So what that is, is our commitment to empathy and to putting our customer's needs first, even when it means making hard business decisions.

And it turns out that because we know diversity drives innovation, diversity has to be a part of that conversation.

The fourth one, which is my personal favorite value, is play, as a team.

So, there's a little comma after play, which we care a lot about.

But what it means is that we can have joy and happiness when we come to work.

And, but we are always a team, we are always together.

You will hear our founders, if you ever hear them, they will talk about the fact that we do not believe in the lone genius.

We believe that everything beautiful and wonderful in the world has been built by groups of people with a shared purpose.

And our last one is be the change you seek.

And that is our commitment to allowing people to build a better Atlassian.

We tell everyone every week our new starters, that Scott says, we hired Atlassian, hired you at Atlassian so that you could change Atlassian.

We don't want you to keep it the same.

And so we found that that concept of culture fit was boxing us in.

The idea that we were describing our culture as a little box that it could fit in rather than the sort of amorphous growing thing.

But we care about our values.

Our values never change.

Our culture simply reflects the different types of Atlassians that we have here.

So we developed a set of behavioral questions that we believe answer the things that we wanna know.

Is this person collaborative? Do they show an initiative to help the people around them? Do they prefer to work in a transparent, open information by default environment? And, really really simple questions.

My favorite, I like to ask people, are you kind? Right, everyone looks at me like I'm crazy, I'm like it's not a trick question.

Right, but if you've never thought about it, we probably have a problem.

Right, like if you've never though about being nice to another person, you will not do well at Atlassian.

I have to be like, look this is a co-interview.

But, it's so easy, values fit, things like one of the questions that I always use, have you ever worked on a dysfunctional team? Why was that dysfunctional? Talk to me about what you, talk to me about your role within that team, and what you did to help alleviate that dysfunction.

And then we have a rubric.

A strong answer is someone who understands their role within their team, and did what they could, within the context of their role to help.

They did something.

They don't have to do a specific thing.

But we're looking for that quality.

A poor answer is someone who says, I just put my head down.

Because, and maybe helping was, I realized there was nothing I could do, and so I looked to change.

Right, that's okay, that's an okay answer.

Because we're looking at your analysis of your ability to create change, and then you're taking initiative you wanna go somewhere that you can.

So things like that have helped us hire a completely different group of people.

And, so right, values fit.

If your company is super stuck on culture, that's totally okay, but I have two suggestions for you.

The first is, when someone says something culture fit, your first question should be what do you mean by that? Articulate what you mean.

Because sometimes that's based on bias, and sometimes there are actual data points.

It also turns out that not using the word culture fit protects you from a lot of lawsuits.

Right, that's like a side benefit.

So we look at diversity inclusion from a opportunity prospective, and the compliance will take care of itself.

Right, or the legal team deals with it.

But, right, so culture fit, don't use it, but use culture add.

So your culture question should be what does this person bring to my team that we currently don't have? That will help you select for diversity.

So, that's a pretty basic set of things that we've done, right? And the reason it's so important is because many people, when they think about doing this diversity work, they actually think about quotas.

How do we manipulate the hiring numbers? How do we get more women into the organization? If we're focused on women.

As a side note, at Atlassian, we actually believe that diversity is inter-sectional, and so our focus on women and oppurtunities for them is only one small part of our larger diversity strategy.

That's important that we never think that diversity's just about women, it's about all of us.

Turns out 1% can't be diverse.

So, yeah, it's, you can't change the hiring numbers because what you're doing is manipulating the wrong part of the system.

Right, X causes Y, and quota manipulates Y, without actually dealing with the deficiencies in X, and the problems with the mechanism by which X transforms into Y.

So what we did, is we changed X and we changed the mechanism.

And, when I tell you it works, I promise you it works.

When I came on board at Atlassian a year and a half ago, we had about 11.5% women in our technical roles, globally.

That is way below market average, but it is not crazy out of bounds with our peer companies in Silicon Valley.

So doing some benchmarking for a high growth company that was about 1000 in head count, that was actually not crazy out of the ballpark, it's objectively really terrible, but it's not out of, outside of the bound of what I would have expected when I came in.

And all of these methods, when I tell you they work, this is what I mean.

Last year's intern class was 46% women.

Our graduate class that year was 17% women, which was twice the representation of the year before.

And it was also our biggest grad class ever.

The latest intern class was 47% women, and our incoming graduate class in January 2017 is 54% women.

Yeah, I know, like what? That's what I said too actually.

Yes, applause for that right? I think that's cool.

That I could like, I can do all of those things, right? That's not rocket surgery.

I told you, I tell really bad jokes.

But, it's that organizational design.

How do we understand the way that psychology, sociology, and organizational theory come together to create the behaviors and outcomes we want? And the, I think one of the reasons we've been so successful is because something that we didn't change was that we left it up to the hiring teams to make the final decisions.

We empowered them and trusted them that they were going to make the right decisions.

And part of the way that we did that, is we also offered, for every single person that's involved in our hiring process as a first priority, and all other Atlassians as well, training in unconscious bias and how they can mitigate it, or optimize their own decision making.

So that means we're equipping people with tools, and building the kind of environments, where they can create the outcomes they want, or as I like to say, they can align their behaviors and decisions with their intentions.

So, we're doing these things at other levels of the company as well, and it's really simple, once you get it up and running, it turns out that it's actually more efficient.

When you build a set of structured interview questions, it takes less time to prep for an interview.

It's much easier to create and write up your feedback on an interview when you have a rubric.

That kind of guides you through the process.

And it turns out that when you hire for diversity, you're actually hiring a higher quality talent pool more quickly, which means your people will be spending less time interviewing and more time doing, but you're gonna get this amazing set of people.

And I focused a lot on women here, but the other thing to consider is that when you make these changes, you actually start attracting a different type of men, too.

So people who are maybe a little less into competition, more into collaboration.

And I think we're at a really interesting spot in Australia in particular because we haven't quite figure it out here yet, but the industry's a little bit younger than in Silicon Valley, and so I think the pace of change can be so much greater.

That's kind of the context that I prepared because I find that a lot of people have a lot of like burning questions about this stuff, so I like to create a lot of space for that.

And this talk is a little bit different than I planned it this morning 'cause I wanted to address the elephant not in the room today, which is what happened in the US last night.

I can tell you that I'm like almost shaking talking about it, and I spent most of my day got blown up because I'm in HR, and when that stuff happens, you spend a lot of time on the phone.

And the reason that this work is so important now, that thinking about this and using all of our analytical abilities, is because we're seeing that is companies who are gonna lead this movement for quality and for opportunity and for innovation.

And technology is the forefront at the bleeding edge of all of these things.

And we do not exist as closed systems in a vacuum, but rather the people that come to us, come to us having faced completely different oppurtunities based on structural factors beyond their control.

But we as companies can start to correct it.

We can prove the model, and we can start to change things.

Because imagine the power, the other things is we try to create a feedback loop with this, so after we hired all these brilliant amazing people, we started doing advertising featuring them.

It turns out that that attracts more people like them.

Right, and there's this great feedback loop.

So I wanna put something out to all today because as an American, and as a woman, and as a Latina person, and as an LGBTI identified individual, especially for the white men in the room, like one, like kudos to you, seriously.

Just for existing because you, of all of the people that exist, have this amazing power to do this.

So research shows us that your voices and your opinions and the things that you want happen much more quickly than those of us with one or more minority identities.

And I am a big believer in collaboration, positivity, and optimism.

And so, while recognizing that the world is really hard today, and I'm sure there are a lot of people here that are struggling with that, myself included, but talking to you all is actually me feel really great.

Take this opportunity to take these pieces of learning, and these things that you have, you're all designers, right, so this is totally in your wheelhouse.

Because you can completely change the composition of this industry.

And for Australia that is so important.

In order to continue to help us, and I say us because I've been at an Aussie company now long enough, I have a lot of love for this place, is that we can actually change it.

This is part of the key of keeping Australia relevant and competitive in the global economy.

By taking advantage of all of the talent that is already there that we just need to create oppurtunities for.

And so I really really encourage everybody, but especially the white men in the room, to recognize, embrace, and celebrate the power that you have and this amazing opportunity to change something that's awesome for you, but also awesome for everybody around you.

So that's what I wanted to close with 'cause it's been a really hard day, and I wanna be like yes we can do it, right? But I also wanna take some questions, or chat, or whatever the best format is, 'cause I know we all have a lot of, how did you do this, what did you do? I'm kind of freaking out right now.

Like that's okay.

This stuff is really hard to talk about, but the more we talk about it, the more we can make progress.

Yeah, thank you so much, yeah.

- Thank you Aubrey.

Why don't we sit down? - Sure.

- I loved all the emotion and all the sort of conviction that was in those, not only last words, but everything you said before.

- Oh absolutely.

People call me Polly-Anna.

- Just to pick up what you just said, the asynchronicity of what is happening on the global stage, and at the same time, what is happening in enlightened companies, do you have any reason why these things are so out of sync? - Yeah.

It's really really hard to change hearts and minds.

And what we know is that, for people that we're closer to that we're interacting with, it's easier for us to have empathy and understanding and communication for them.

And so the larger these systems get, the harder it is to maintain that connection, and empathy is really the thing that motivates people to help others, especially unlike themselves.

And so companies, by virtue of being these smaller systems, one are actually more interesting playgrounds for testing out a lot of this, so but we also have this really interesting opportunity, and I'm really into the idea of the potential of marketing, and PR, for this because all of the research on bias, and sort of brain plasticity, shows that the more we see counterstereotypical images, the more our expectations about what happens in the world changes.

So that means that companies, by publicly and openly investing in these things, just talking about the problem is actually part of the solution.

And so we can test and we can move faster than, the US government is, you know, presides over 350 million people.

Like that's just a lot of people to get all moving in the same direction, right? Like how many times have you been in triad in universe, trying to get everyone to agree with each other? It's really hard.

So I think that's a cool thing, is that by engaging in that, and by, you know, we have a video we call Women of Atlassian Building the Future, that just highlights a lot of the amazing work that the women at Atlassian are doing, but we think that's part of it, that the more girls and the more boys and the more people, non-binary people, see images of women doing interesting things like technology, it'll just become normal, right? It's to the point where the sort of homogeneity becomes abnormal, and we're already starting to see it, in the US in particular with Millennials, right.

There are eight year olds right now that have never seen a white person as president.

That's gonna change soon, but think about that.

- An orange president-- - Right yes, this is true.

I have had those disasters myself, a self-tanner, but yeah so I think that there's this really interesting thing where because it's a small system, we're creating that empathy and that engagement is easier, and the levers that we need to push to change things are closer, we can move faster, we can be more agile than these sort of enormous systems.

We can prove the models, and then bring them up to those higher systemic levels.

- Can I just ask, what was a big obstacle you actually faced, I mean everything sounds great in the end where you got to, but what is a problem that anyone here in the room might face if they try to take on some of your advice.

- Absolutely.

So I think the biggest, I genuinely believe that the biggest obstacle to making progress on this is this attitude or belief in meritocracy.

And that's because there's two really really important reasons.

The first is that the people that are represented are the people in power in tech right now, have a lot emotionally to lose by believing that the meritocracy does not exist.

So we need to have empathy for how hard that is.

I, just totally honestly, I watch, especially white men, but lots of other people, I think that they have often the furthest to go and the hardest job, and we need to support them in doing that, is you have to accept the things that you have achieved in your life are not solely due to your own talent.

And that is a really hard emotional journey to accept.

It does not mean that you're not brilliant and you haven't earned everything that you've gotten, but we need to understand the structural factors that allow us to achieve.

In my own life, I can tell you, I was adopted when I was three years old.

And I was adopted by the most amazing couple in the universe, in my opinion, I'm highly consciously biased about that.

And, but I'm Mexican-American, and my adoptive family is white.

And they're middle class.

And my dad's an attorney.

And he told me that I could have whatever book I wanted growing up.

He didn't put a time clause on that, so I'm still taking advantage of it.

But imagine that, I just had parents that cared about education, and had the financial means to send me to a great school.

My dad was an engineer before he as an attorney and told me that I was great at math and science, and so I should do that.

But he was fighting against the idea that everything else in the media was telling me me I shouldn't do that.

And I also really like languages so I went and got a degree in journalism in Arabic.

That's not super useful anymore, but and my Arabic is really bad now, but right, just those types of things, those oppurtunities that we had that we don't think, and I think we think in that way, in a systemic way, it makes that emotional journey easier.

- Do you have any sort of advice on how you can do one little thing today or tomorrow, I'm just reminded of my colleague, Andy Bolaine, who just before I came here, said you know, whenever I get asked to be on a panel, I ask if there's also women on the panel, otherwise I don't do it.

And if they don't want that, then I can swap out myself for a woman on the panel.

You know, that's an easy thing to do.

- Totally.

I think the biggest thing is if you're involved in the hiring process, demand, just say I will not do interviews until you give me a diverse slate of candidates for these open roles.

Because I don't believe that I can actually assess and get the best person without seeing a broad set of candidates.

A statistical trick, it turns out, that if there's only one woman in the group, the statistical chances that she's hired is like zero.

But if there are two, or two minorities or some type, so it depends on what type of diversity, you know, your organization lacks, or wants to focus on.

But once you have two the odds go up to like 40% no matter how many other people are on the slate.

So right, cool, like use math.

Math is great.

So that's a little thing.

The other thing I've been telling people, just as humans, that's really good, is we know that viewing counterstereotypical information can make us less biased.

So I actually, and I bunch of people are going go check me on this, about every two to three months I go on to my Twitter, and I make sure that I'm following roughly 50-50 gender balance of voices, and I look for culturally diverse people to follow as well.

I literally go on to Google and say, like, black women in machine learning, and like people come out of these lists, like I can find them, and through network effects you can find other people with those identities working on those really interesting topics, so it's topical to whatever you're interested in, most of my Twitter is about diversity and social justice because I need to know what's going on, and that's based on my job.

But, those are little things you can do.

And if you are a person in your workplace, all of us have privilege in some way, shape, or form.

Think about how you use that privilege for someone next to you.

Think of your self in a constant state of ally-ship.

So right, I might be a racial minority and a women in tech, but I'm also, I don't have any physical disabilities, and so that provides me with oppurtunities that maybe some of my colleagues don't, and so I can be an ally to that.

Or I can be an ally to more senior folks in the workplace because we know ageism is a thing.

And so-- - Just yesterday I was having a chat with Vince Frost from Frost Design, which is around the corner here, and they shot a film about disability and had a disabled director, and they had a teenage director for a teenage film.

You know it's like those things where you say, when we co-create, and we try to design something for family tax benefits let's say, you know, do we have a family person in the group, or do we have, you know, people who are disadvantaged? - Absolutely.

Yeah and I think that's a really really interesting, exciting space that I'm getting more interested in, is in product design around diversity and inclusion.

So that's something that we also think about at Atlassian with our diversity and inclusion strategies, it's not just about workforce, it's also about the way we do business and our DNA, and how we deal with our partners.

It's everything from our suppliers, we prioritize trying to hire suppliers who are diverse, but also even in our product design.

So things like looking at the default genders that we have as options, or what types of avatars are in the products, or to reference back to the talk before, thinking about the effect of comments and privacy policies on your products, like you have consumer facing stuff.

Because it turns out that the comments tend to drive women off the platforms, and things like that, so make more intentional design decisions because people are starting to look more and more at the business side of things when they're evaluating.

I'm gonna get in trouble for saying this, but Slack actually, no one left, we have, so.

I'm not supposed to talk about Slack.

But, they have a senior designer there, his name is Diogenes Brito, he's a black man, and just tiny little ad campaign that they did, but they made a Back to Slack button, and it was like a cloud and a hand came down and grabbed the Slack button, and it was a black hand.

And he wrote this like, you need to go read the media post, it's amazing, about it, but he talked about he basically freaked out for like an hour in his head about the design choice to like make a black hand because it was so crazy because no one shows black people in tech advertising.

And the incredible outpouring of the black community in tech at that, was just like insane, they were like, oh my God, I've never done that, and for us, we have these little people called the Meeples, like our little avatars and cartoon characters, and we do periodic design refreshes, and last year we added a Muslim woman who wears a hijab, to sort of the composite of the little meeples that we use.

And I publish blog posts a lot about what we're working on, and I made this little group and I included the hijabi meeple.

I got more engagement about Muslim women freaking out about how excited they were that we had a hijabi than any of the content that I wrote.

Like I don't even know if people read the blog post.

Hopefully, but, so I think it's like really cool as designers, you have so much power to shape those narratives, and shape those things.

So don't even think it's just about the HR people.

- Excellent.

Thank you very much.

I think we still have a few minutes, so if people feel compelled to grab a mic and ask a question, I don't know actually where the microphones are, but if somebody does have a question.

Yup, anyone? Possibly? Alright then, second row.

- [Audience Member] You've spoken openly about gender diversity and also touched a little bit LGBTI diversity, I'm wondering if you've had a look at diversity in aspects of ability, be it physical or mental and intellectual disabilities as well? - Yeah absolutely.

So to back up a little bit broader, and then I'll answer your question directly, which is, we talk about diversity as an intersection of different things, and we think part of that is it drives engagement 'cause I know, and I talk about white men a lot, but I think they're really important in this work, so I talk about them a lot, and I don't think diversity professionals do.

They often feel really alienated from it.

And so we talk about intersections as a way to bring everyone together into that.

And when we think about disability is absolutely something we think about.

Both from a workforce point of view, and from our product design.

So to tell a story that actually happened to me yesterday that felt awesome.

I, or not yesterday, Tuesday.

I land in Sydney at about 7am, and I went straight to the office and I got out of elevator, and I went to the bathroom, and I realized that inside all of the stalls were posters about how to design products for people with different types of disabilities.

So physical limitations, eye sight problems, hearing impairment, which isn't as relevant to our products.

And some others.

But, so in terms of diversity of our workforce around disability, we don't necessarily have particular recruiting targets around that population, but we partner with sourcing agencies that we know provide oppurtunities.

So we've partnered with Enabled Employment here in Sydney, and also the California Department of Rehabilitation in our SF and Bay Area offices, so we think about making sure that folks with disabilities know that we have oppurtunities for them, and we're really happy to have them there.

And then we have sets of resources.

Obviously the compliance based things, you know, the right bathrooms and all of that.

But yeah, we think about that as well.

And we talk about neuro-diversity, so it's really important, especially for us, we found folks sort of around mental health and then folks who are on the autism spectrum.

So as a lot of people know in tech, people with autism tend to do better, or there are a lot of jobs that really work for them, which is great.

And so part of that is education.

We encourage our Atlassians to write blogs about their life and their experiences because I believe in the power of storytelling to create empathy and to create those connections, and understanding about what people need.

So we've had a few of our employees, and interns even, on the spectrum, write about, you know, their oppurtunities and challenges of living, you know, with autism.

And it's really great because it helps our managers understand what they need to do to better support those folks, and for those of us that don't have it, we understand how to be better colleagues.

And then of course we have our HR team, who is always available.

You know, we make accommodations for folks that need it.

You know, little things like, right now we're sourcing vendors to make sure that we have captions on all of the videos for our staff on hands, and our Atlassian summit, which is our biggest user conference of the year, this year we actually added sign language interpreters to all of our sessions.

So we try to think about those principles, both for our workforce and the way that it impacts our ecosystem.

- Thank you very much, I hope you'll take some inspiration for that, for your companies, or if you're interested in Atlassian obviously, you can try to join them right here.

- Seriously, Atlassian dot com slash careers.

- That's exactly right.

- We're hiring.

If you're awesome, we'd love to have you.

- Thank you very much Aubrey.

- Thank you.

" ["post_title"]=> string(126) "Video of the Week: Aubrey Blanche–Scaling Walls: The Barriers to Female Representation and How Atlassian is Eliminating Them" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(92) "video-week-aubrey-blanche-scaling-walls-barriers-female-representation-atlassian-eliminating" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-12-16 12:24:08" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-12-16 01:24:08" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6683" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#235 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6678) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-25 14:48:46" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-25 03:48:46" ["post_content"]=> string(2773) "Direction '16 took place the day after the US election. I wasn't alone in being more than a little despondent with the result, and in particular several of our speakers were from the US and were significantly affected by the outcome. My sense is that the vast majority of our audience felt similarly. In response, I spent a few minutes talking about the philosophy behind this year's program, which I hadn't originally intended to (I typically hope that the underlying themes emerge throughout the event, rather than making them overt). My basic point was simple. We who work on the Web, and more broadly in technology, are very fortunate. We're well paid, and get the chance to pick the work we do, and who we work for. Many of our contemporaries, indeed most people in the world aren't nearly so fortunate. I see this privilege also as a responsibility. To choose what we do with this opportunity wisely. To do better.   Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(33) "Opening thoughts for Direction 16" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "opening-thoughts-direction-16" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-25 14:48:46" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-25 03:48:46" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6678" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#234 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6668) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-22 13:43:06" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-22 02:43:06" ["post_content"]=> string(2627) "Well, Direction 16 is done and dusted, and the relative quiet here the last couple of weeks is testament to just how much effort goes into running conferences (though planning 2017 has also taken considerable time). Last year at Web Directions, Maciej Cegłowski's "The Website Obesity Crisis" caused quite a stir, and the video has been watched hundreds of thousands of times since. We were very privileged to have Maciej back for Direction 16, and his presentation did not disappoint. Addressing the challenge of AI, autonomous vehicles (of all kinds), robots and much more, he asks, "What role do we have to play in all this?" A question definitely worth asking. Please enjoy the closing keynote from Direction, and we'll be back November 9 and 10 2017 with more like this.   Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(78) "Maciej Cegłowski video from Direction 16: Who Will Command The Robot Armies?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(61) "maciej-ceglowski-video-direction-16-will-command-robot-armies" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-23 15:51:14" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-23 04:51:14" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6668" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#233 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6665) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-07 11:53:29" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-07 00:53:29" ["post_content"]=> string(4064) "With Direction 16 starting in just couple of days, we wanted to point out a couple of the related events that always pop up around Web Directions events. We do what we can to foster, house and support local meetups, community groups and professional development opportunities for people in the web and digital industry. In this case, we'd like to draw attention to two events that might be of particular interest, not only to Direction 16 attendees but just as much to anyone in Sydney who's interested in the Web and digital.

In Conversation with Josh Clark

6pm-8pm Wednesday 9 November 2016 Camperdown NSW The Sydney Local Chapter of Interaction Design Association (IxDA) hosts one of the leading minds in Web and Interaction Design, 'Designing for Touch' author - and Direction 16 keynote speaker - Josh Clark. This interactive Q&A session chaired by Katja Forbes, local leader for IxDA Sydney, will explore hot topics related to designing for mobile. Mobile is taking the centre stage where smartphones have become the primary device for nearly all of us. A growing number of organisations now see most web visits come from mobile devices. How to make sure your mobile experience reflects that? What’s next for mobile interfaces? What does jogging and designing for mobile have in common? Find out all this and much more! The Q&A session will be proceeded by drinks and canapes hosted by Sydney University's Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning. Registration is $15 and open until 5pm Wedenesday via Eventbrite.  

Sydney Web Accessibility and Inclusive Design Meetup - World Usability Day

7pm-9pm Thursday 10 November 10 2016 The University of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Wilkinson Building, Camperdown 2006 With World Usability Day and Web Directions falling on the same day, we couldn't let the chance go by to have a fun-filled event to bring the accessibility, UX and digital inclusion communities together! Join us on November 10 for a mega-meetup, where we'll have a number of presentations on digital inclusion and why it matters. You'll also have the chance to meet plenty of new faces (and hopefully see some familiar ones too!)

Speakers:

Patima Tantiprasut - Empathy, design, shoes and more Director & Studio Manager for Bam Creative in Perth, co-founder of Mixin conference and AWIA Committee member, Patima is a vibrant, engaging speaker. In this talk, she'll be exploring inclusive design, why it matters and how even the smallest details, from colours, to font treatments to even language, can make a huge difference to individuals. Adem Cifcioglu - Putting users first - The new Coles Online Web Developer, A11y Bytes organiser, co-founder Intopia consultancy and well-known speaker, Adem is one of Australia's leading digital accessibility experts. In this presentation, Adem will walk through the process of revamping the shopping giant online to make it user-centred and accessible, from design to development to user testing to production. This is a free event sponsored by Intopia. Please register via Eventbrite - spaces are limited." ["post_title"]=> string(27) "Direction 16 Related Events" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(27) "direction-16-related-events" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-07 11:53:29" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-07 00:53:29" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6665" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#232 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6661) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 12:18:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 01:18:20" ["post_content"]=> string(2781) "Erin MooreWhen Erin Moore gave her talk at Web Directions in 2014, she was Senior UX Designer at Twitter. She has since moved on, but many of the insights she delivered came from her work with the social media giant. Her topic was time, that concept that measures our personal lives, dominates our working lives and seems sometimes to enslave us. It's not a particularly technical talk, but cuts to the heart of how we do what we do, why we do it, and - inevitably - how we could manage our time better. As such, it's a great lead-up to next week's Direction 16 conference.

 

directionad

 

Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(51) "Video of the Week: Erin Moore - Convenient Fictions" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "video-week-erin-moore-convenient-fictions" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 12:18:20" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 01:18:20" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6661" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#231 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6652) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-03 14:46:51" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-03 03:46:51" ["post_content"]=> string(5600) "Scroll MagazineHere is the third and final set of extracts from the interviews we conducted with Direction 16 speakers for Scroll Magazine. These are only snippets - to see the full answers, come to Direction 16, where all conference and workshop attendees get a free print edition (88 bound pages of articles and interviews with full colour photos and illustrations). Scroll will also be available for digital download post-conference. Today's question: Do you see yourself as more of an artist or a scientist? Mark Pesce (Inventor, VRML): I see myself as a problem-solver. Having an engineer’s education and temperament, I do occasionally get an eye to creating an artistic work, and then approach it with a bizarre mixture of pragmatism and intuition. Caroline Sinders (Machine Learning Designer, Buzzfeed): I guess I’m much more of a scientist now, but it’s really hard me to shake the fact that I started my career off in art, and I tend to approach everything as a photojournalist, as a photographer. Pasquale D'Silva (Product Designer, Hype): 99% Artist, 1% other. Computers have always been a means to an end. The less I’m aware of the fact that I’m using technology, the deeper the flow state I can get into. Jacob Bijani (Product Designer/Engineer, Tumblr): Of the two, definitely more of a scientist. I did go to art school, but I've always enjoyed the technical side of making things more. I really enjoy seeing something I've built come together and take life. Jenn Bane (Community Director, Cards agains Humanity): Hmm... neither. I’m not an artist, I’m not a scientist. I do think of myself as a writer now. It’s part of my identity and my brain is wired for storytelling. Jonathan Shariat (Product Designer): You must be a scientist in your approach to understand problems, possible solutions, and your users’ needs. You also need to be an artist by putting a little of yourself into your work and making it pleasing to use. Anna Pickard (Editorial Director, Slack): Artist, I guess, if I have to pick between the two. But artist more in the sense of craftsperson - I write as if I’m putting something together with my hands, moulding it, hacking things off, adding things on, making whatever it is function the way I want it to function. Matt Griffin (Film Maker & Designer): I see myself as a craftsperson. Which has elements of both, I suppose. Art is largely for expression of the self, design is for solving problems. Aubrey Blanche (Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, Atlassian): I definitely see myself as more of a scientist. I'm always joking that I'm a 'recovering academic', but anyone on my team can tell you it's true. Andy Clarke (Designer & Art Director): For me, working on the web isn’t about problem solving, as it is for many people. My fascination is with how we can use the web as a creative medium to tell a story, communicate an idea or maybe sell a product. That’s something that the fine artist in me still loves to do for our clients. Josh Clark (IxD, Big Medium): It’d have to be science. I’m a systems guy. I like to figure out what makes things tick, what makes people tick. I’ve always been excited about studying and creating systems that help to empower and enable, to amplify what folks can do.   directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(36) "One Question, Many Answers: Part III" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(34) "one-question-many-answers-part-iii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-03 14:49:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-03 03:49:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6652" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#230 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6645) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-02 12:31:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-02 01:31:26" ["post_content"]=> string(2663) "Ben BuchananOur video ristretto this week comes to us from one of those people who hooked up with us from even before our Web Directions days, and has been a key supporter even as his own career has blossomed. He's now Front End Lead at Ansarada, and at Code he gave a great talk about the importance of versioning. Take a look and then, if you haven't already, come on over and register for Direction 16.

 

directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(51) "Video Ristretto: Ben Buchanan - The SemVer Talk 1.0" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(44) "video-ristretto-ben-buchanan-semver-talk-1-0" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-02 12:32:08" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-02 01:32:08" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6645" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#229 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6640) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-01 10:31:23" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-31 23:31:23" ["post_content"]=> string(4411) "One of the benefits of organising events like Code, Respond, Transform and - in just over a week - Direction is the events that other people organise around the conference that add value and depth to their whole experience. SilverStripe is a major sponsor of Web Directions and has supported our events for the past six years. This year, they’re running a community conference alongside Direction 16, the inaugural StripeCon APAC. The best news is Direction ticket holders can attend this event for FREE. Come along to learn:
  • * How digital transformation and open source go hand in hand
  • * Pragmatic insights into successful digital transformation projects
  • * What the future holds for large-scale digital projects
Among the highlights, you'll hear from Bene Anderson, Service Delivery Manager, All-of-govt online products & Paul Murray, All-of-govt ICT Capability Manager, NZ Department of Internal Affairs on Overcoming common challenges facing public sector digital projects. Paul and Bene manage services that support New Zealand Government organisations to deliver better online experiences. Their presentation will focus on challenges that Government organisations face, and how the Common Web Platform and Open Source are making it easier to meet those challenges. Colin Westacott, Director of Strategic Partnerships for Ephox Cognitive will profile this advanced new editing environment that combines the power of the world's most advanced editor with the power of cognitive computing. Ephox Cognitive will significantly help content creators and authors to easily build complete, accurate and current content by presenting them in real time with relevant and in context content that already exists either from internal or external sources - textual or rich media. Users will have automatic access to a huge store of content and be able to copy, reference or drag and drop video into their new content really easily. In other sessions, you'll also hear from folks at Little Giant, Wolf Interactive, Internetrix and, of course, SilverStripe on digital transformation, multi-region synchronisation, the UX and UI of multi-site setups, and user engagement beyond direct interaction. There will also be a hugely relevant workshop run by Sanicki Lawyers, called Legal issues for Creative Businesses in the Digital Age.  It provides an introduction to legal issues for those working in new media, design and technology, game development, graphic and web designers and web-based startups. It touches on issues concerning copyright ownership, the use of authoring programs, and the need for those in the creative space to have appropriate contracts in place with employees, independent contractors or unpaid volunteers. It also provides a basic introduction to protecting intellectual property including branding and brand protection, Trade Marks, the use of music, terms of trade agreements, privacy issues, end-user licencing and business structures. (NB Sanicki Lawyers, a law firm specialising in the creative industries, is offering free 15 minute, 1-on-1 legal advice sessions for conference delegates for the duration of Direction 16 to answer any business or legal queries you may have. To arrange your free consultation, contact Darren at darren@sanickilawyers.com.au or 0412 723 725.) It will be an amazing day, without a doubt, and a great intro to the Direction 16 conference. StripeCon APAC Details When: Wed 9 November 2016 Where: Australian Technology Park, Sydney Who should attend: digital leaders and developers. In the evening, join us for the official kickoff of Direction 16 at the Australian movie premiere of “What comes next is the Future”, sponsored by StripeCon APAC. Tickets are free for Web Directions ticket holders by using the code direction16. Register for StripeCon APAC now." ["post_title"]=> string(42) "Direction 16 Partner Event: StripeCon APAC" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "direction-16-partner-event-stripecon-apac" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-01 10:31:23" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-31 23:31:23" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6640" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#228 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6636) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-28 08:15:45" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-27 21:15:45" ["post_content"]=> string(2489) "Cap WatkinsOur long form Video of the Week this week is of Cap Watkins delivering his Web Directions 15 keynote, "Design Everything". This is really appropriate in light of our upcoming Direction 16 conference, where these kinds of ideas, philosophies and their practical application all come to the fore. Cap is a wonderfully engaging speaker, and some of the points he makes might sneak up on you. And then, you might feel inspired to sign up for Direction 16 - it's going to be an amazing few days. Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(50) "Video of the Week: Cap Watkins - Design Everything" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "video-week-cap-watkins-design-everything" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-28 08:15:45" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-27 21:15:45" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6636" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#227 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6632) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-26 12:04:34" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-26 01:04:34" ["post_content"]=> string(2780) "Simon SwainThis week's video ristretto come from just a few months ago at our Code conference in Sydney and Melbourne. If you've seen any of Simon Swain's presentations at our events, you'll know he comes up with some pretty breathtaking stuff. Rats of the Maze is no different - although it may be different to anything you've seen before. As you watch, remember this is all running live in the browser. Can anything at Direction 16 top that? Well, yes. Probably. See for yourself!. Come and join us as we bring the future to the present. directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(47) "Video Ristretto: Simon Swain - Rats of the Maze" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "video-ristretto-simon-swain-rats-maze" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-26 12:05:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-26 01:05:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6632" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [11]=> object(WP_Post)#226 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6629) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-25 10:59:08" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 23:59:08" ["post_content"]=> string(6582) "Time for the second in our series of extracts from the interviews we conducted with Direction 16 speakers for Scroll Magazine. All conference and workshop attendees get a free print edition (88 bound pages of articles and interviews with full colour photos and illustrations) while it will also be available for digital download post-conference. Today's question: What is something "forgotten" you'd like to see make a comeback? Mark Pesce (Inventor, VRML): Mindfulness. Caroline Sinders (Machine Learning Designer, Buzzfeed): Probably the usage of buses. I know that sounds strange, but let me explain. There’s all this talk right now of self-driving cares and how they’re going to revolutionise the way we travel, and I kind of wish we would create better bus systems. Self-driving cars allow only for one to four people to fit within them, but buses can allow for many more. It would be great bring that back and focus on that more. Pasquale D'Silva (Product Designer, Hype): Classical animation, back in the theaters. Disney / Pixar has been steering the community into some wonderful pockets of storytelling, and visual development… but it’s becoming much of the same. 2d takes just as long as computer generated films to produce today. You can do things in 2d, that you could never do in 3d. You have an opportunity to defy physics, simulation and geometry. I think this reasoning has been forgotten, and it’s a shame. Jacob Bijani (Product Designer/Engineer, Tumblr): RSS feeds. Really, the whole idea of an open web. Being able to make an "API mashup" that cobbled together some features you wanted was pretty awesome. I think it inspired a lot of great ideas. Now everything is so closed and protected, and with how iOS is built it's basically impossible to customize apps like you could with browser extensions. Jenn Bane (Community Director, Cards agains Humanity): All the drive-in theaters in my area are closed – do those still exist at all? I want to go to a drive-in, let’s bring those back. Watching a movie outside sounds so peaceful. Or maybe it’s terrible. I genuinely don’t know and want to try it! Jonathan Shariat (Product Designer): The Flash intro. Ha ha. But seriously, I miss some of the real creative experiences during the time Flash was around. Some were quirky, others were sublime or beautiful, I loved the diversity of it all. Today, we see less diversity in the experiences on the web. I hope we can start seeing people take more risks and create some real memorable experiences. Anna Pickard (Editorial Director, Slack): People being themselves on the internet. OK - well, that’s unfair. The world is full of people being themselves on the internet. But I do miss an unfiltered, more open (and in many ways more vulnerable) internet, an internet where people were unafraid of presenting themselves honestly and openly. Matt Griffin (Film Maker & Designer): Inline styles. Just kidding, they’re already making a comeback. Batten down the hatches, friends. Aubrey Blanche (Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, Atlassian): I'd be down with "please" and "thank you." As we rely more on machines to do things for us, we've lost the value of politeness to a certain extent. I'd love a world in which the Amazon Alexa I have at home would refuse to turn on my TV unless I asked politely. Not necessarily because it's crucial for me to be nice to my appliances, but because everything we do is constantly re-wiring our brain into new habits. Andy Clarke (Designer & Art Director): Recently I’ve developed an obsession for boutique publishing, in particular independent magazines such as Elliot Jay Stocks’ ‘Lagom.’ Somehow the variety of magazine layouts combined with the feel of a printed magazine makes the format incredibly satisfying. While we focus on making compelling digital products and websites, we mustn’t forget that print can be equally compelling. I’d love to see more digital creatives make printed work. Josh Clark (IxD, Big Medium): Wow, the beaming feature of the Palm Pilot. Remember that? If you wanted to share contact info or set up a meeting with someone right next to you, you just pointed your Palm Pilots at each other, and it was done. That’s so hard to do now! We fumble with our phones, scramble with apps, and then finally just email or text the other person. We’re clumsy now, but the Palm was elegant: just point, beam, done.   directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(35) "One Question, Many Answers: Part II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(33) "one-question-many-answers-part-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-25 10:59:08" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 23:59:08" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6629" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [12]=> object(WP_Post)#225 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6626) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 13:16:57" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 02:16:57" ["post_content"]=> string(7819) "Those of you who have seen the Scroll Magazine we produced for our Code 16 conference (and if you haven't, you should) will have noticed that we published a list of all our speakers and their topics at previous Code conferences. That resulted in a list of 80+ presentations and a bit of a who's who of web coding, programming, engineering over the preceding five years. We've reproduced the list below. Now, when it came to Direction 16, we had to decide how we would handle this idea, if at all. Long story short, we decided we would do it, so the Direction 16 edition of Scroll has a pretty amazing list of over 300 presentations from 2006 to 2015, but this time sorted in alphabetical order of speaker name so it's easy to see who has addressed the conference more than once. As a point of curiosity, there's just one speaker who has given five talks at Web Directions during that period. Care to guess? In any case, have a browse of our previous Code speakers below and make sure you get a copy of the Direction 16 edition of Scroll - all conference and workshop attendees receive a free print edition (88 bound pages of articles and interviews with full colour photos and illustrations) while it will also be available for digital download post-conference.   Speaker Name (Year) Topic Alex Russell (2015) What comes next for the Web Platform? Rachel Nabors (2015) State of the Animation Alex Sexton (2015) Current best practice in front end ops Clark Pan (2015) ES6 Symbols, what they are and how to use them Ben Teese (2015) A Deep-Dive into ES6 Promises James Hunter (2015) Async and await Alex Mackey (2015) JavaScript numbers Andy Sharman (2015) Classing up ES6 Jess Telford (2015) Scope Chains & Closures Kassandra Perch (2015) Stop the Fanaticism - using the right tools for the job Mark Nottingham (2015) What does HTTP/2 mean for Front End Engineers? Mark Dalgleish (2015) Dawn of the Progressive Single Page App Elijah Manor (2015) Eliminate JavaScript Code Smells Domenic Denicola (2015) Async Frontiers in JavaScript Chris Roberts (2015) Getting offline with the Service Worker Simon Knox (2015) Crossing the Streams Jonathon Creenaune (2015) Back to the future with Web Components Rhiana Heath (2015) Pop-up Accessibility Warwick Cox (2015) Console dot Simon Swain (2015) Canvas Cold War Raquel Vélez (2014) You can do what with math now? Alex Feyerke (2014) Offline First: faster, more robust and more fun (web) pages Ryan Seddon (2014) Web Components: the future of web dev Rod Vagg (2014) Embrace the asynchronous Fiona Chan (2014) The declarative power of CSS selectors Ben Birch (2014) When all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail Ben Schwarz (2014) CSS Variables Mark Dalgleish (2014) Taking JavaScript out of context Rob Manson (2014) The Augmented Web is now a reality Damon Oehlman (2014) Streaming the Web (it’s not what you think) Barbara Bermes (2014) A publisher’s take on controlling 3rd party scripts Paul Theriault (2014) Taking front-end security seriously Jared Wyles (2014) On readable code Mark Nottingham (2014) What’s happening in TLS (transport layer security)? Andrew Fisher (2014) A Device API Safari Alex Mackey (2014) Harden up for ajax! Allen Wirfs-Brock (2014) ECMAScript 6: A Better JavaScript for the Ambient Web Era Tantek Çelik (2014) The once and future IndieWeb Dmitry Baranovskiy (2014) You Don’t Know SVG Angus Croll (2013) The politics of JavaScript Jeremy Ashkenas (2013) Taking JavaScript seriously with backbone.js Alex Danilo (2013) Create impact with CSS Filters Julio Cesar Ody (2013) What’s ECMAScript 6 good for? Glen Maddern (2013) JavaScript’s slightly stricter mode Nicole Sullivan (2013) The Top 5 performance shenanigans of CSS preprocessors Tony Milne (2013) Making and keeping promises in JavaScript Cameron McCormack (2013) File > Open: An introduction to the File API Silvia Pfeiffer (2013) HTML5 multi-party video conferencing Elle Meredith (2013) Source Maps for Debugging Jared Wyles (2013) See the tries for the trees Garann Means (2013) HTML, CSS and the Client-Side App Michael Mahemoff (2013) What every web developer should know about REST Mark Nottingham (2013) HTTP/2.0: WTF? Ryan Seddon (2013) Ghost in the Shadow DOM Troy Hunt (2013) Essential security practices for protecting your modern web services Marc Fasel (2013) Put on your asynchronous hat and node Alex Mackey (2013) Typescript and terminators Aaron Powell (2013) IndexedDB, A database in our browser Andrew Fisher (2013) The wonderful-amazing-orientation-motion-sensormatic machine Chris Ward (2013) Test, tweak and debug your mobile web apps with ease Steven Wittens (2013) Making things with maths Faruk Ates (2012) The Web’s Third Decade Divya Manian (2012) Designing in the browser John Allsopp (2012) Getting off(line): appcache, localStorage and more for faster apps that work offline Dave Johnson (2012) Device APIs-closing the gap between native and web Damon Oehlman (2012) HTML5 Messaging Silvia Pfeiffer (2012) Implementing Video Conferencing in HTML5 Max Wheeler (2012) Drag and Drop and give me twenty Anson Parker (2012) The HTML5 History API: PushState or bust! Tammy Butow (2012) Fantastic forms for mobile web Andrew Fisher (2012) Getting all touchy feely with the mobile web Rob Hawkes (2012) HTML5 technologies and game development Jed Schmidt (2012) NPM: Node’s Personal Manservant Dmitry Baranovskiy (2012) JavaScript: enter the dragon Anette Bergo (2012) Truthiness, falsiness and other JavaScript gotchas Ryan Seddon (2012) Debugging secrets for the lazy developer Jared Wyles (2012) Removing the dad from your browser Mark Dalgleish (2012) Getting Closure Tony Milne (2012) Party like it’s 1999, write JavaScript like it’s (2012)! Tim Oxley (2012) Clientside templates for reactive UI Damon Oehlman (2012) The mainevent: Beyond event listeners Dave Johnson (2012) Building Native Mobile Apps with PhoneGap and HTML5" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "Idea of the Week: Web Directions Alumni" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "idea-week-web-directions-alumni" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 13:16:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 02:16:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6626" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [13]=> object(WP_Post)#224 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6618) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-21 10:30:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-20 23:30:18" ["post_content"]=> string(2588) "Since this is in my hands this week while John Allsopp takes a bit of family time, I'm taking the opportunity to "rescreen" a talk of John's from Web Directions 2012. Not only is everything he talks about still relevant, it relates directly to what Direction 16 is about. Now with that in your mind, take a look at the schedule for Direction 16, then register and come and join us for what will be an extraordinary couple of days. John Allsopp Direction 16

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(79) "Video of the Week: John Allsopp - What We Talk About When We Talk About The Web" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "video-week-john-allsopp-talk-talk-web" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-20 23:32:06" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-20 12:32:06" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6618" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [14]=> object(WP_Post)#144 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6608) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-19 10:30:06" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-18 23:30:06" ["post_content"]=> string(2670) "Kai BrachOur short video this week is Kai Brach's talk from WD15. Kai went from being a web designer to publisher, editor and art director of independent print-only magazine Offscreen. He's well placed to describe how the internet has enabled a new generation of indie makers in various lines of business. And if that makes you wonder what Direction 16 has in store, step right this way. It's full of incredible insights for digital product designers, owners and managers. directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(49) "Video Ristretto: Kai Brach - The New Age of Indie" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "video-ristretto-kai-brach-new-age-indie" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-20 00:43:19" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-19 13:43:19" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6608" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } } ["post_count"]=> int(15) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#237 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6690) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-12-23 10:53:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-12-22 23:53:18" ["post_content"]=> string(10969) "Let's face it. For many, 2016 hasn't been the best year ever: the loss of several beloved cultural icons, currents of political decision-making that didn't feel like steps forward, pessimistic news on the climate change front ... But it's well known that cultivating a mindset of gratitude is overwhelmingly positive and healthy. And so, at the end of this seemingly endless and at least personally exhausting year (one in which I turned 50), I wanted to reflect on some really positive things that we managed to achieve at Web Directions in 2016, some of them long standing ambitions.

A brand new conference – Transform

Since the beginning, many of our audience have come from the government sector, and over the years we've run workshops, and even entire conferences focused on Government and the Web. But with the significant changes happening around the World in Government service delivery, kick-started in many ways by the UK's GDS, and more recently taken up with gusto here in Australia with the establishment of the DTO (now DTA), we decided it was time for a conference focusing on this area. So in May (timed originally to avoid the election season planned later in the year, but which ended up being held over the period of the conference) we brought together pioneers in government service deliver from the US, UK, NZ and around Australia for Transform. A great success, we're back again at the end of March, again as a single day, single track conference, plus a day of optional workshops.

Not one but two new publications – Scroll and Wrap

When you go to a conference, you're almost invariably handed a program. Well designed, printed at quite some expense, and largely useless except as a memento. So this year we decided to do something about that. For each of our major events, we produced an edition of Scroll, a beautifully designed magazine that features in depth interviews and profiles of speakers, as well as articles of relevance to our industry. You can only get a physical copy by coming to our events, but you can download all three editions from 2016 now. But that's not all. I've long wanted to ensure that attendees obtained the most possible benefit from coming to our events, benefit that lasted far longer than the experience of being there. To this end, we've for several years made videos of presentations available to attendees, but this year we started Wrap, a detailed writeup for each session from each conference, once again beautifully designed by the folks at Handle. Even if you missed the conferences, there's real value in Ricky Onsman's detailed write-up of every session from every conference this year. Grab your copies today!

Expanding Respond to two days (and two cities)

In 2013, Web Directions was two conferences: Web Directions in Sydney, and Code in Melbourne. In 2017, we'll run four major conferences, two of which (Respond and Code) will take place in three cities. The growth began in 2014, when we ran Respond as a "popup" conference–a single day in Sydney focusing on the specific challenges around front end design. This year we not only extended it to two days, it also travelled to Melbourne, where its audience was even a little bit bigger than the Sydney audience!

Expanding Code to two cities

Hand in hand with this, we took Code on the road, to Sydney as well as the city where it started in 2012, Melbourne. And as I mentioned, we'll be also heading to Brisbane with Code in 2017.

Reframing, refocusing and rebranding our major conference, Direction

Part of all this was a really significant rethink about Web Directions, the conference that started it all for us way back in 2006. For many years, this was essentially our entire business. At one point in 2012, it grew to four tracks, a genuine behemoth. But in time we came to realise that focus is the key to great events. So, by 2015 we'd pared Web Directions back to two tracks, one focused on design and big ideas, and one focused on engineering–a combination of the sort of thins we cover in Respond and Code. But programming multiple developer conferences in Australia (Code, then three months or so later, the Web Directions engineering track) was really hard. So this year our goal with all our events was to integrate and coordinate them better, to allow each event to specifically focus on an area of practice, and to allow experts in specific areas of that field to dive deeply into their area of expertise. Which left us with something of a challenge for the the rebranded Direction (I wrote about the choice of name, and how direction is quite different from directions, earlier in the year). Many events of similar nature around the world might best be characterised as a "celebration" of the Web. But celebrations of their nature look backwards, rather than forwards. And there's only so much celebrating one can do. So we definitely wanted Direction to maintain significant professional relevance. What we felt was that for really established professionals, particularly with more of a design focus, or with an overall strategic focus within a team or organisation, the people shaping the direction (geddit?) their product, or company or organisation is taking, there isn't always a lot on offer. So, we developed Direction as precisely this–a way of keeping track of developing technologies (like this year VR and AR), ideas, and practices. It's more for the sort of person who might call themselves a designer but, to be honest, design sensibility and - dare I say it - "design thinking" are central to successful products, companies, organisations, and so in a way Direction is for a much wider audience. Judging by the responses (including via anonymous survey), this rather large leap into the unknown went a long way to achieving what we'd hoped, and we're already lining up some extraordinary speakers for 2017.

Speaker development

One day, I'll try to write up our vision for what it is we actually do, or at least strive to do here at Web Directions. But in essence it is to help people within our industry develop their skills and capabilities. One area we've focused on recently is helping people develop their presentation and public speaking skills. As part of this, we've worked with local groups like Women Who Code to hold workshops specifically for women to help develop these skills.

Developing an insurance offering

As if we didn't have enough to do with all we'd bitten off, we're also developing an idea I've been working on for quite some time: great value, fully featured insurance for freelance/contract workers as well as smaller agencies offering Web design and development services in Australia. That might seem significantly different from much that we do here, but it definitely aligns with our mission to help build the industry and, most importantly, its professionals. Starting at $39 a month, paid monthly, and with no lock-in, it will be available in early 2017. If you're keen, sign up to our mailing list to be the first to know, or drop us a line with any questions.

Refining our visual identity

In mid 2015 we started on a major overhaul of our visual identity, our Web sites, and more or less all our communications. While it's yet to have hit our main web site (that's coming), the sites for each of our "products" have been significantly overhauled. This is all part of a transition for us toward a focus on professional and industry development, as our industry transitions from peripheral, an adjunct to marketing or - in some ways even worse - IT, to an integral part of the organisations we work in or with.

2017

I've already foreshadowed much of what we'll be doing in 2017, something of a consolidation year for us, after the year of hectic innovation that was 2016. We'll be:
  • * holding Transform, our government service delivery focused conference in March in Canberra
  • * holding Respond, our front end design conference in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane in May
  • * holding Code, our front end development conference in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane in late July and early August
  • * holding Direction, our product/experience/design and big ideas conference in November
As mentioned, we'll also be launching our Public & Product Liability and Professional Indemnity insurance offering early in the year, we'll be producing Scroll and Wrap to go with each event, and maybe we even have one or two other things up our sleeve.

Thank You

As we wrap up a huge, and at times challenging year, there's a few folks we'd really like to thank. Ricky Onsman has come to almost every conference, workshop, and event we've ever run, including traipsing all the way to Vancouver for Web Directions North. This year, he's come on board as Managing Editor for all our content, and allowed us to achieve some of these things we'd been planning for many years. Michael and Georgina Schepis at Handle Branding, whom we found almost by accident last year, and who've helped deliver amazing experiences with Scroll and Wrap, the signage at our events, and much more. If you're looking for folks to do brand design, signage, print or any sort of communications design, you really should get in touch with them. Simon Wright has been coming along to our events since the early days, and has been our Art Director for the last couple of years as we've transitioned from a couple of folks doing almost everything themselves (including at times making people coffee at our events), to the sort of company we aspire to become. A huge part of this has been to develop the visual identity of the company, something Simon has done with great aplomb. Public Speaking for Life is two fantastic people, Sarah Ewen and Tarek Said, who run workshops, training and a community meetup in Sydney around developing public speaking skills. They've helped us deliver some fantastic training for speakers, and you should really look at what they have to offer. We also want to thank our dozens of conference speakers, writers for Scroll and Wrap, our event volunteers and, above all, you - the folks who've attended our conferences, workshops and events." ["post_title"]=> string(14) "2016 in Review" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(14) "2016-in-review" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-01-13 12:08:10" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-01-13 01:08:10" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6690" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "753" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(51) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(true) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "cd15f7c06249973e2ffe0fd408452899" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } }

Blog

Morning coffee for web workers News Feed Podcast

2016 in Review

Let’s face it. For many, 2016 hasn’t been the best year ever: the loss of several beloved cultural icons, currents of political decision-making that didn’t feel like steps forward, pessimistic news on the climate change front …

But it’s well known that cultivating a mindset of gratitude is overwhelmingly positive and … Read more »

Video of the Week: Aubrey Blanche–Scaling Walls: The Barriers to Female Representation and How Atlassian is Eliminating Them

There’s little doubt technology has a diversity challenge. There’s a lot of conversation about why that might be – although less about what we might do about it, particularly in terms of specific action.

Aubrey Blanche from Atlassian spends her life thinking about this, and developing programs and practices to address … Read more »

Opening thoughts for Direction 16

Direction ’16 took place the day after the US election. I wasn’t alone in being more than a little despondent with the result, and in particular several of our speakers were from the US and were significantly affected by the outcome. My sense is that the vast majority of our … Read more »

Maciej Cegłowski video from Direction 16: Who Will Command The Robot Armies?

Well, Direction 16 is done and dusted, and the relative quiet here the last couple of weeks is testament to just how much effort goes into running conferences (though planning 2017 has also taken considerable time).

Last year at Web Directions, Maciej Cegłowski’s “The Website Obesity Crisis” caused quite a stir, … Read more »

Direction 16 Related Events

With Direction 16 starting in just couple of days, we wanted to point out a couple of the related events that always pop up around Web Directions events. We do what we can to foster, house and support local meetups, community groups and professional development opportunities for people in … Read more »

Video of the Week: Erin Moore – Convenient Fictions

Erin MooreWhen Erin Moore gave her talk at Web Directions in 2014, she was Senior UX Designer at Twitter. She has since moved on, but many of the insights she delivered came from her work with the social media giant. Her … Read more »

One Question, Many Answers: Part III

Scroll MagazineHere is the third and final set of extracts from the interviews we conducted with Direction 16 speakers for Scroll Magazine. These are only snippets – to see the full answers, come to Direction 16, where all conference and … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Ben Buchanan – The SemVer Talk 1.0

Ben BuchananOur video ristretto this week comes to us from one of those people who hooked up with us from even before our Web Directions days, and has been a key supporter even as his own career has blossomed. He’s now … Read more »

Direction 16 Partner Event: StripeCon APAC

One of the benefits of organising events like Code, Respond, Transform and – in just over a week – Direction is the events that other people organise around the conference that add value and depth to their whole experience.

SilverStripe is a major sponsor of Web Directions and has supported our … Read more »

Video of the Week: Cap Watkins – Design Everything

Cap WatkinsOur long form Video of the Week this week is of Cap Watkins delivering his Web Directions 15 keynote, “Design Everything”. This is really appropriate in light of our upcoming Direction 16 conference, where these kinds of ideas, philosophies and … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Simon Swain – Rats of the Maze

Simon SwainThis week’s video ristretto come from just a few months ago at our Code conference in Sydney and Melbourne. If you’ve seen any of Simon Swain’s presentations at our events, you’ll know he comes up with some pretty breathtaking … Read more »

One Question, Many Answers: Part II

Time for the second in our series of extracts from the interviews we conducted with Direction 16 speakers for Scroll Magazine. All conference and workshop attendees get a free print edition (88 bound pages of articles and interviews with full colour photos and illustrations) while it will also be … Read more »

Idea of the Week: Web Directions Alumni

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • October 24, 2016
  • Comments Off on Idea of the Week: Web Directions Alumni

Those of you who have seen the Scroll Magazine we produced for our Code 16 conference (and if you haven’t, you should) will have noticed that we published a list of all our speakers and their topics at previous Code conferences.

That resulted in a list of 80+ presentations … Read more »

Video of the Week: John Allsopp – What We Talk About When We Talk About The Web

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • October 21, 2016
  • Comments Off on Video of the Week: John Allsopp – What We Talk About When We Talk About The Web

Since this is in my hands this week while John Allsopp takes a bit of family time, I’m taking the opportunity to “rescreen” a talk of John’s from Web Directions 2012.

Not only is everything he talks about still relevant, it relates directly to what Direction 16 is about. … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Kai Brach – The New Age of Indie

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • October 19, 2016
  • Comments Off on Video Ristretto: Kai Brach – The New Age of Indie

Kai BrachOur short video this week is Kai Brach’s talk from WD15. Kai went from being a web designer to publisher, editor and art director of independent print-only magazine Offscreen. He’s well placed to describe how the internet has enabled a … Read more »