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Why are we even hosting this Web Directions AI event in Sydney on 28 September, given that our conferences typically focus on digital design and development, predominantly in a web-based context? Over the last 12 to 18 months, I've been become increasingly aware that adding even a little intelligence to our existing products and services can have surprisingly positive impacts on user experience - and on profitability. That's before we even talk about the new products and services that become possible, feasible and likely with the introduction of new levels of machine intelligence. Web Directions AI is about putting this all squarely in the context of what we currently do and will be doing in the near future. Let me explain. AI What do we mean by AI? When it comes to Artificial Intelligence, we typically think and talk in terms of science fiction, robots and the future. The same goes for the related concepts of Machine Learning and Cognitive Computing. There's a perception that is all future tech. Web Directions AI sets out to dispel this notion, and provide a real world context for what AI is now and will increasingly become. William Gibson came up with a now well-known quote that certainly applies to this: 'The future is already here — it's just not evenly distributed". "Real world"? Really? Like most people, you probably use predictive typing on your phone. Your device's ability to predict the rest of the word you're typing is driven by a form of artificial intelligence. Now imagine predictive typing being removed from your phone. Remove just a little intelligence from one small, but vital aspect of that device, and its usefulness plummets. The original iPhone shipped without even copy and paste functionality, but it did have predictive typing, a use of AI that has become expected and something we wouldn't want to lose. Right now, the role of AI in our digital products and services is limited. My prediction is that in a couple of years, though, designers, developers, UX and CX specialists, information architects, product managers and content strategists who don't embrace and master AI will find themselves left behind. So what's the conference about? Web Directions AI is about helping you to understand the capabilities of the technology today, and how straightforward and inexpensive it can be to add sophisticated AI capabilities to your work. It's about understanding the design opportunities of voice, chat and other "cognitive" technologies, and understanding the business opportunities, decisions and challenges of adopting anything from straightforward sentiment analysis, through triaging incoming support requests, to creating fully fledged intelligent chat interfaces. Web Directions AI uses a format of expert talks, case studies and practical examples along with Q&A discussion opportunities, drawing on the expertise and experience of people doing some amazing work in this area right now. Who should go to this? If you work in the web and digital industry, and you're already thinking about or working with AI technologies, we'll help you get a deeper understanding of the key pillars of the Technology, Business and Design of AI. And if you work in the web and digital industry and you're NOT thinking about AI, we'll show you why you should be, and how. What do I do now? Want to know more? Keen to register? The full program is at the AI conference site. Note that numbers are strictly limited, and we expect tickets to sell pretty quickly now that they are available as of today. The Early Bird price for this new one-day conference is $599. After 1 September, it goes up to $699. I'm really excited about this brand new Web Directions event, focused on an area of technology that I honestly believe will be as significant an opportunity for you, me and all our colleagues as the early days of the web itself. If you need a bit of extra perspective on why I think this becoming such an exciting area for us, I've posted a few current and topical reading suggestions on our website.  " ["post_title"]=> string(68) "Why is Web Directions Holding an Artificial Intelligence Conference?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(57) "web-directions-holding-artificial-intelligence-conference" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-07-21 15:21:15" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-21 05:21:15" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7654" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#963 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7649) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-07-21 09:07:47" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-20 23:07:47" ["post_content"]=> string(3865) "As we get ready to fully launch our newest conference, Web Directions AI, I've pulled together some particularly interesting perspectives on AI for your reading pleasure. Watch out for an email today with all the details of the one-day conference in Sydney on 28 September. Cheating at AI Hopefully, it's clear by now that I think an area anyone - whether  more on the design, engineering or business sides of the Web/Digital/Technology area - should be focusing on involves what we broadly call AI. So much so that we're about to launch our brand new AI focused conference, taking place in Sydney in late September. If you want some quick overviews of the key ideas, Stefan Kojouharov has assembled a list of "cheatsheets" on machine learning, neural networks and more related topics. It's 1996 all over again Ever fewer of us in the field remember the website designs of 1996: the year "Killer Web Sites" dominated the web design conversation and the year of the first US Presidential election to take place in the consumer web era. For increasingly many, this is a lifetime ago. Dole/Kemp 96 website - no AI Putting today's sophisticated interactive web experiences up against this makes you wonder how even we got from there to here. But all technologies take small incremental steps from the realm of the early adopter to the mainstream, and today's hotness, chatbots (I prefer the broader idea of conversational interfaces), are very much in their infancy. Vittorio Banfi makes the argument that Chatbot design today is like web design in 1996, and who wouldn't want the opportunity to get in the time machine back to the start of web design and help shape that field? Well, maybe this is your chance. Machines versus abuse The sheer scale of modern social platforms like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, with hundreds of millions and even billions of active users a month, makes any sort of human powered curation and moderation laughably impossible. Perhaps this is why these platforms seem so often to be associated with negative human behaviours, from fake news to bullying and abuse. These behaviours can be difficult to detect and respond to. There's also the challenge of company valuations being a function of active user numbers, driving short term disincentives to removing users, even fake ones, from the network. Recently, Instagram has begun turning the potential of parent company Facebook's machine learning engine DeepText to the challenge of bullying and abusive behaviour on its platform. More at Web Directions AI If you're keen to learn more, keep an eye on Web Directions AI  taking place in Sydney at the end of September, with program announcements starting next week. From design to business and technology, if you have even the vaguest inkling that this stuff is going to be important in what you design and deliver, don't miss AI!" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "John's AI Reading Links" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "johns-ai-reading-links" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-07-21 09:07:47" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-20 23:07:47" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7649" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#964 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7642) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-07-19 09:30:49" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-18 23:30:49" ["post_content"]=> string(3320) "Delivering a conference presentation about the commercial use of virtual reality technology is a pretty thankless task, a bit like trying to demonstrate colour on a black & white television set. Back at our end of the end of year Direction conference in 2016, Aaron Spence took this on by having his fabulous assistant wear a VR headset as various experiences played out, the vision of which was then shown on the big screen - admittedly 2D but impressive all the same. It's also worth noting that quite possibly every person at the conference had a go at using a VR headset from the several made available by Aaron's company Panedia expressly for the purpose. The video of Aaron's talk is about half an hour long and really demonstrates how far VR has already penetrated into a range of commercial and other uses.    

Got your ticket for Summit 17 yet?

Last year's Direction has morphed into this year's Summit - two days and two tracks of presentations crammed with ideas, challenges, techniques and breakthroughs in design, development and the overarching themes and concerns driving the breakneck evolution of our web and digital industry. It all takes place in Sydney on 9-10 November. Come and join us!  

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-fortnight mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions, as well as regular bursts of links to relevant articles & resources curated by John Allsopp - and we can promise you some exclusive and substantial subscriber benefits.
" ["post_title"]=> string(70) "Video Ristretto: Virtual Reality as Used in Our Reality - Aaron Spence" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(57) "video-ristretto-virtual-reality-used-reality-aaron-spence" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-07-18 21:15:49" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-18 11:15:49" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7642" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#965 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7630) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-07-18 09:30:01" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-17 23:30:01" ["post_content"]=> string(9734) "Back at Direction last year (that's the one that's evolving into Summit this year), Jennifer Wilson gave a compelling talk on using gamification to achieve behavioural change in health practices. One of the examples she used in her presentation was an app developed by her company The Project Factory for a government health agency, and Jennifer was kind enough to also write the following article for our Wrap magazine, which went into a bit more depth about My QuitBuddy. It's a pretty compelling case study and I think you won't have any trouble seeing where some of this leads.

Giving Up By Design

Jennifer Wilson, Director, The Project Factory

Jeniifer Wilson Five years ago, when we at The Project Factory built the Quit Now: My QuitBuddy app for the then Australian National Preventative Health Agency (ANPHA), I realised we had created one of the things I am most proud of in all my 30 years in this industry. We wanted to build something that would truly help people who wanted to quit smoking achieve their goal. Designing the app, we channelled smokers we knew, applied everything we’d learned from other projects about what created genuine engagement, and we trod very carefully through deep personalisation, behavioural dynamics and nudge theory to get the balance right. 700,000 downloads later, a clinical assessment has shown that QuitBuddy has the highest effectiveness rating of any quit smoking technique. I think we got it right. My QuitBuddy logo

Changing Behaviour

What we learned from QuitBuddy has influenced all the other work we’ve done, notably in the health field and specifically when addressing any form of behaviour change: • onboarding that allows the app to be tailored to the individual; • goal setting to aid in reinforcing intent; • personal growth feedback that enhances the intrinsic benefits of change; • gamified elements to encourage adherence and continued use; • permitted failure – where you can fail without major penalties; • and careful support through timed alerts, checkins and distractions. One thing that seems to really work is the ‘slip-up’ test. We ask those on the quitting journey if they are still smoke-free, or if they ‘slipped up’. If they do slip up, we then ask if it was ‘just a slip-up’  or if they need to restart their program. There’s no rebuke, no reprimand – just a suggestion they identify triggers to help stop this happening again. Interestingly, over two-thirds of people who say they slipped up do go on to restart their program – a fabulous level of personal honesty.

Vice Control

We’re now in a fascinating new space that really extends what we know. Smoking, like a few other negative behaviours (abuse, violence, bullying, etc) is binary: you either smoke or you don’t. While some claim to be social smokers, most of us recognise this as a black and white issue. But what about drinking? Or the odd recreational line of coke, tab of ecstasy or marijuana joint? Or the occasional night on the pokies? Or even that maxed out credit card, and those unworn dresses or shoes? I knew someone who so looked forward to their one glass of wine at the end of the day, they decided they had a real problem and so signed up to AA. Conversely, I’m sure we all know someone who thinks that a few bottles of wine a night or half a bottle of spirits isn’t adversely affecting them. Sure, they know it’s too much, but it isn’t having a negative impact on their life and they feel in control. Looking at behavioural change in this space is different. It is less about supporting someone on a journey to be free of a bad habit or vice, and more about helping them determine if they actually are in control of their behaviour, and whether they are really aware of its impact. The same elements we used for QuitBuddy do come into play, but need to be applied differently and some new tools need to be used. We need to set a baseline for behaviour, check in with the participant to assess how they feel about what they are doing, and get some understanding of their circumstances, moods, relationships, etc. This then forms a baseline we can track them against. Some, but not all, people will have goals  – and where they do, the process of defining a program to reach these goals becomes our primary task. This is more straightforward and similar to cessation goal setting: set the target; work out the steps, timeline and process to achieve this; motivate them along the way; support them where they fail; and encourage them to try again. My Quitbuddy

Making Honest Choices

We still need to make the experience as personal as possible – in many cases we are asking people to share what might be embarrassing or even illegal habits with us. Our feedback must then be honest, direct and targeted personally to them. We need, over time, to carefully repeat all those initial questions we asked in the beginning when we were setting a baseline. These need to be phrased differently, to come up at random times, to be appropriate questions to what they were looking at in the app – and definitely not feel intrusive. We can then report back to them on any impacts their behaviour appears to be having on their lives based on their own self-assessment. This might be increased mood swings, a worsening of a work or family situation, higher levels of anxiety, stress or financial concern, or an increase in recognised risk behaviour (eg unsafe sex). From here, the participant can choose their path. It might simply be seeking more information on the impacts of their activity – increasing their awareness and helping them make better decisions. Or it might be that they choose to take more control over their behaviour and work to reduce this to a point where they are more in control.

Regaining Control

It is this sense of control that is the key: whether it is to quit smoking, increase exercise, control our shopping instincts or even learn to deal with our anger. Digital offers uniquely personal and intimate support to help us be the governors of our actions. I believe that, as we explore this area, we can potentially develop a tool – a generic process – that can be applied to any behaviour where we need to  reassert our control over the activity. Which is just as well, as once we have our analogue habits under control, we may well need to apply this to our digital addictions! My QuitBuddy  

Got your ticket for Summit 17 yet?

Last year's Direction has morphed into this year's Summit - two days and two tracks of presentations crammed with ideas, challenges, techniques and breakthroughs in design, development and the overarching themes and concerns driving the breakneck evolution of our web and digital industry. It all takes place in Sydney on 9-10 November. Come and join us!  

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-fortnight mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions, as well as regular bursts of links to relevant articles & resources curated by John Allsopp - and we can promise you some exclusive and substantial subscriber benefits.
" ["post_title"]=> string(56) "Direction 16 Wrap: Giving Up By Design - Jennifer Wilson" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(53) "direction-16-wrap-giving-up-by-design-jennifer-wilson" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-07-18 21:04:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-18 11:04:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7630" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#966 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7625) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-07-12 12:24:57" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-12 02:24:57" ["post_content"]=> string(1009) "Our Call For Proposals to present at Summit is now open. Yes, we curate the conference, but we like to leave room for outstanding, relevant talks from local speakers, experienced or not. Sessions are 20 minutes long, and open to Australian residents. If you're successful, we'll fly you to Sydney, put you up, and treat you like any other speaker. If you have already registered to attend the conference and you are selected to present, we will happily refund your registration fee. If it's your first time presenting, we'll also give you every assistance to hone your talk. Come on, come and join the big league! The Summit CFP is open until 31 July." ["post_title"]=> string(61) "Web Directions Summit 17 Call For Presentations: Be a Speaker" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(51) "web-directions-summit-17-call-presentations-speaker" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-07-12 12:24:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-12 02:24:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7625" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#967 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7621) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-07-12 12:24:52" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-12 02:24:52" ["post_content"]=> string(6178) "With meanings including the highest point of a mountain, a peak of achievement, and a meeting between people on a particular topic, Summit seems a particularly apt new name for our annual Sydney-based summer conference. Web Directions Summit 17 is where we bring together some of the most renowned and advanced thinkers and practitioners in the world around technology, culture and society. Above all, we seek to learn, exchange and promote ideas that inform how we all approach and refine our own work, now and into the future. In returning to a 2-track format for our annual flagship event, structured so that attendees can focus on engineering, focus on design, or mix and match according to their own priorities, we're recalling some of the spectacular Sydney summer Web Directions conferences of the past, with our eyes firmly fixed on the future. And now it's time to reveal the first of our Summit speakers. (Do read on for your Early Bird discounts.)   Web Directions Summit

The Speakers

Our first two keynote speakers each define and embody exactly our approach to this conference, and we feel privileged to bring them to Summit to share their insights with you.   Summit 17: Chris Messina & Genevieve Bell   Chris Messina invented the use of the hashtag for Twitter, a convention now adopted across almost all social media. But Chris's contributions to the web go far beyond this one small, significant innovation, from co-working (he was one of its originators), Microformats and Web Standards, to deep thinking about the broader impact of technical advances on society, the economy and culture, and working with companies as diverse as Yahoo!FirefoxGoogle and Uber. A renowned cultural anthropologist at Stanford UniversityGenevieve Bell moved to Intel in the late 1990s, eventually becoming Director of Intel's User Experience Research Group. Now back in her home country as a Professor at the Australian National University College of Engineering and Computer Science, Genevieve focuses on "how to bring together data science, design thinking and ethnography to drive new approaches in engineering" and explores the questions of what it means to be human in a data-driven economy and world.

The Presentations

Summit 17 is going to be two very full days in November packed with inspiring, challenging, entertaining and thought-provoking presentations from our four keynote speakers plus over 30 Australian and international speakers addressing key topics relating to our role in the ongoing evolution of the web, digital technology, design and engineering. It's already shaping as a tremendously exciting conference, and the structure we have in mind is coming together. But there's an important element missing. You. Not just to attend, although we hope lots of you do and we know lots of you will (in fact, lots of you already have!), but as a presenter. If you have any interest in joining us a speaker at Summit 17, jump over to this page and get the details.

Pricing

We always keep our prices as low as we can, and we have complete confidence in the quality and relevance of our speakers and their presentations, but we also know that a little incentive can sometimes make it easier to find room in a limited budget, especially if you have to convince someone else. Thus, we have our Early Bird discounts. Register during the Primary Early Bird period up to 15 September and get $200 off the regular cost.
  • Classic Summit ticket (conference only) for just $999 (save $200)
  • Silver Summit ticket (conference plus videos) for just $1,199 (save $200)
  • Gold Summit ticket (conference, videos and speaker dinner) for just $1,299 (save $200)
Hot Tip: Can't allocate funds to this just yet? You can register now and pay later.  Tell me more about Summit 2017 We are constructing Summit 17 as a summer festival of sorts: a festival of ideas, challenges, people, organisations, approaches and understandings. In this way, we hope to advance the industry, and your career. One cautionary note: up to this point, before announcing any speakers or talks, about 15% of available tickets have been sold(the venue's locked in so our numbers are limited). Given that, and the fact that Code sold out completely before Early Bird even closed, it is probably wise to book your place at Summit 17 sooner rather than later. I hope to see you in Sydney this November. " ["post_title"]=> string(34) "First Summit 17 Speakers Announced" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(34) "first-summit-17-speakers-announced" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-07-12 12:24:52" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-12 02:24:52" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7621" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#968 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7615) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-06-30 13:28:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-30 03:28:30" ["post_content"]=> string(2243) "Sara SoueidanWe're going back to Respond 16 for our Video of the Week this week, when Sara Soueidan came to visit and delivered an inspiring, eye-opening keynote presentation on what can be done with CSS and SVG working together. It's an excellent talk, and really needs no more introduction than that.    

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.
" ["post_title"]=> string(66) "Video of the Week: CSS + SVG: A Designer's Delight - Sara Soueidan" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(50) "video-week-css-svg-designers-delight-sara-soueidan" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-06-30 13:28:30" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-30 03:28:30" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7615" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#969 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7608) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-06-21 16:17:08" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-21 06:17:08" ["post_content"]=> string(2952) "Rob HowardOur short video today is a fascinating one from Code 16, where Rob Howard explored the notion that not all tools, methods, functions or operators are necessarily the best for what you have in mind. It sounds obvious but I'd wager most of us misuse our tools in some way, perhaps over-using what is comfortable even if it's not ideal, or under-using the right tools for want of knowing any better. Take 25 minutes to let Rob explain why it might be worth taking the time to find the best - the right - fit.    

Got your ticket for 2017 yet?

For Code 17, we've put together a truly remarkable two-day program of international and local speakers digging into front end engineering and development, coming to Melbourne (only) on 3-4 August. Come and join us!  

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.
" ["post_title"]=> string(53) "Video Ristretto: The Things You Can't Do - Rob Howard" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(38) "video-ristretto-things-cant-rob-howard" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-06-21 16:17:08" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-21 06:17:08" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7608" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#970 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7604) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-06-21 10:04:56" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-21 00:04:56" ["post_content"]=> string(3576) "We're opening registrations for Web Directions Summit today. Summit is our new peak annual flagship event at Australian Technology Park in Sydney on 9-10  November, which brings together all the tribes that make up our industry. Based on the format of the original Web Directions conferences, Summit is two days and two tracks of presentations by expert practitioners focused on what's happening now and in the immediate future in design and development. These talks will be topped and tailed by keynotes that dive into the big picture: where design is going, what the future looks like for engineers, how the disciplines have grown and branched out, ongoing issues like performance and security, plus the ideas, philosophies and breakthroughs that will influence our work into 2018 and beyond. Participants can choose to attend two days of cutting edge design talks, or focus their conference entirely on the development and engineering track, or jump between the two tracks according to what most interests them. And the keynotes will be chosen for their over-arching relevance and significance to our industry as a whole. We are deep in discussion with some of the world's leading thinkers and doers in web technology and beyond, and we'll be releasing the names of specific speakers as they're confirmed. We can say that we are committed to making Summit a true festival of and for our emerging digital industry, including the web as we know it now and whatever may come next. As we're 10 days out from the end of the financial year, we're opening up registration now for those who want or need to commit funds before the 30th of June. Being so far ahead of the event date, naturally we're going to offer some pretty juicy Super Early Bird benefits if you register now (even if you pay later). Register before 1 July and we'll give you to a Gold ticket (includes all the conference videos and a place at the Speaker Dinner) for the price of an early bird Classic ticket. That's $300 off the early bird Gold ticket price for ALL the goodies. There are plenty of other ways to register early and get significant discounts - take a look on the website for the deal that best suits you - but Super Early Bird is only until 30 June. Summit You'll hear lots more about Summit in coming months, including some pretty special events taking place around the conference, but you have an opportunity now to lock in your registration, take advantage of the discounts and upgrades available, and settle back as you watch Summit develop into the major annual conference for web and digital in Australia, safe in the knowledge that your place is guaranteed. Whether you register before the Super Early Bird finishes on 30 June, during the main Early Bird periods, or at the last minute in November - I hope you'll join me at Web Directions Summit." ["post_title"]=> string(64) "Registrations Now Open for Summit Conference in Sydney, November" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(56) "registrations-now-open-summit-conference-sydney-november" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-06-21 10:04:56" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-21 00:04:56" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7604" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#971 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7586) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-06-19 23:08:00" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-19 13:08:00" ["post_content"]=> string(6675) "Localisation (or localization) is one of those things that seem simple at first glance, but the further you go into it, the more of a rabbit warren you realise it is. Fortunately, once you've worked out what's needed, it can become a largely automated or at least controlled process and, as Greg Rewis' talk at Code 16 demonstrated, one that can be managed to very positive effect. Here's our Wrap summary.

Does Your Web App Speak Schadenfreude?

Greg Rewis, Lead Developer Evangelist, Salesforce

Greg Rewis

Key points

The title refers to the German word for the enjoyment of another person’s misfortune, and is a way of saying this talk is about internationalisation and localisation. Research suggests that a website not translated into 16 languages is not a global site. Internationalisation (i18n) is the work that prepares a site for localisation (l10n), which translates sites from one language into another. Localisation affects more than words: also numbers, dates, currency, symbols and more. Culture plays a big role in how people perceive web pages, from where they look to how they move around the page to the balance between text and images. Edward Hall’s 1976 book Beyond Culture found there is a high-context culture (where images and animation play a greater role) and a low-context culture (where text dominates).
“Web developers have to stop thinking in the patterns that are specific to their own locale.”
Code 16: Greg Rewis

Takeaways

An example: Americans use dashes between the groups of digits in their phone numbers, but this will cause a form built by someone who does not use dashes to fail. Text on buttons can become problematic when the target word translated into another language is much longer or shorter than the word you started with, wrecking your layout. When setting font sizes, don’t go for 16pixels because it’s fairly standard in English – 20px is better for many languages, especially Asian. Use the lang attribute. Assistive technology like screen readers will attempt to read out a word like schadenfeude in English unless lang=de tells them otherwise. Google Translate will translate words not in English unless you use translate=no to tell it otherwise. This allows you to use non-English words without having them translated. Consider words and phrasing that are more universally understood, for example not all cultures understand are familiar with “from” and “to” when applied to dates – “start” and “end” are more widely understood, and still work in English. Think about how translating English into a language that’s read from right to left might change structure and maybe meaning. Test your layouts to see how they will look in different languages. Consider how colours can have different meanings in different cultures: red doesn’t always mean stop, and green doesn’t always mean go. Use resources like http://l10nchecklist.com to check your projects.
“Our culture – not just our language – influences the way we read a page.”

Caveats

Translation is not just swapping a word in one language for one in another language – the context has to be taken into account. Even within one language, words can have different meanings and different connotations, depending on context and cultural values. Phrases in one language might be single words in another, with no opportunity to break or wrap. Japanese uses three different alphabets, one of which uses characters that are individually wider than letters in English, thereby making text strings longer, even though they may use the same number of characters. Characters in some languages may extend further up and down the line height than in others. Capitalisation is another danger area – be aware that some languages have customs that are different to English, so don’t force capitalisation. Text decoration like bolding and italics may not work in languages where several words are combined into one – you can’t bold just a part of a word in some Asian languages. Some languages indicate emphasis in completely different ways, such as adding symbols on top of words, or putting words into a coloured background. Text embedded in images is not going to respond to translation. If you want to tell users other languages are available, be aware that, for example, “Spanish” is the English word for Spanish, not the Spanish word. Flags are not good indicators for language – they indicate nations, some of which use multiple languages, and many different nations use the same language.

Resources

@garazi slides website github Localization Checklist

Tweets

Code 16: Greg Reiws Code 16: Greg Reiws Code 16: Greg Reiws Code 16: Greg Reiws Code 16: Greg Reiws Code 16: Greg Reiws" ["post_title"]=> string(58) "Code 16: Does Your Web App Speak Schadenfreude? Greg Rewis" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(56) "code-16-does-your-web-app-speak-schadenfreude-greg-rewis" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-06-20 00:59:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-19 14:59:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7586" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#972 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7576) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-06-16 11:03:15" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-16 01:03:15" ["post_content"]=> string(7126) "We can see that more and more engineers and developers are moving into positions where they are expected to have and develop managerial skills. But managing teams of devs can involve unique circumstances and require specialised skills. That's why we invented Code Leaders. Running in conjunction with our long standing, highly regarded Code Conference for front end engineers and JavaScript developers, Code Leaders focuses on what senior engineering decision makers need to know about right now. As the things we build and the teams and organisations that build them become ever more complex, technical knowledge and capabilities simply aren't enough. Code Leaders is designed for engineering and development leaders, senior developers, lead engineers, engineering managers, CTOs. It doesn't matter so much what your role is called, if you're responsible for building and leading teams, and making strategic decisions about the technologies your company or organisations uses, Code Leaders is designed for you. Code Leaders takes place over a single, intensive day, and features real world experts addressing key challenges of technology, leadership and developing, maintaining and growing great engineering teams. There's full information on the website, including registration and some great pricing options, but here's a brief overview of what you can expect from Code Leaders.

Session 1: Technology

In this session, we'll look at the current state, and near term developments of the core technologies of the web: JavaScript, HTML, CSS, SVG and the browser's APIs, from two of the world's leading experts. JavaScript: Now and Next: Brian Terlson Code Leaders - Brian Terlson Where is JavaScript at right now, in 2017? And where is it headed in the near future? What changes will most impact the way you work in the coming years? How can you get involved in the process? The State of Front End Technologies: Chris Lilley Code Leaders - Chris Lilley In our era of Web Apps, where JavaScript seems paramount, the core technologies of the web: HTML, CSS, SVG, and the browser's DOM APIs still very much have a place when developing for the web. Chris Lilley gives us a sense of what's coming for the foundations of the web platform.

Session 2: Best Practice

In this session, we'll look at how networks impact performance, and security, and the architecture of Web Apps, again with two world leaders in these fields. The Changing Face of Loading Resources: Andrew Betts Code Leaders - Andrew Betts The underlying transport mechanisms of the web, including HTTP and TCP are being overhauled. This session looks at the evolution of these largely out-of-sight but incredibly important protocols, with huge implications for performance and security for today's web. Modern Web App Architectures: Zero Cho Code Leaders - Zero Cho What is the architecture of complex Web Apps? Few apps work at the scale of Twitter, with hundreds of millions of users, and billions of messages a month. Hear about the architecture, and lessons learned building Twitter Lite.

Session 3: Culture

This session turns to the challenges that face senior engineering professionals and management: people, and ensuring the best from and for them. We draw on the experience of experts in building more diverse, inclusive, highly performing teams. Re-imagining the Hiring Process: Elle Meredith & Lachlan Hardy Code Leaders - Elle Meredith We've all been on the other side of the table. A laundry list of required technologies and practices, white boarding code, logic puzzles, folks "hiring for culture fit". But do these practices ensure the best possible hires, and ultimately the best performing teams? Designing a Culture that Fosters Growth: Josh Duck Code Leaders - Josh Duck In this session Josh, now back in Australia managing a team at the ABC, shares lessons he learned working for Facebook, renowned for both its engineering prowess and also growing its engineering head count at an almost unimaginable rate over the last decade.   That's quite a day. Now, we've deliberately limited numbers for Code Leaders to ensure the greatest opportunity for participants to connect with one another, our leaders and invited experts. It's a day for minimum screen time, and maximum connection and communication. During the day you'll be seated with a group of fellow participants with a balance of experience as leaders. Each table will have a facilitator, someone with significant industry experience, and will have the opportunity to put questions to our expert speakers. Throughout the day there'll be the opportunity for every participant to develop their leadership abilities by facilitating post-briefing discussion among your group. You'll also get the opportunity to connect with our leaders and invited experts during the day. This is a new event, we've kept our prices low, and we do encourage you to register early. Given the number of tickets we've already sold, it is likely that this event will sell out. If you're in the business of leading or managing teams of engineers and developers - or you'd like to get to that kind of position - do not miss Code Leaders." ["post_title"]=> string(22) "Code Leaders 17 Launch" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "code-leaders-17-launch" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-06-16 11:03:15" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-16 01:03:15" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7576" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [11]=> object(WP_Post)#973 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7571) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-06-14 17:28:32" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-14 07:28:32" ["post_content"]=> string(3168) "Marcos CaceresNow that the full schedule for Code 17 is available, it seems appropriate to acknowledge that there is just one speaker from Code 16 who is back this year: Marcos Caceres. While this year, Marcos is talking about Payment APIs, last year he focused on Service Worker, the technology that gives Progressive Web Apps offline capabilities and functional caching, as well web notifications. As you prepare for the extravaganza in Melbourne that will be Code 17, why not give yourself a 25 minute break with Marcos?    

Got your ticket for 2017 yet?

For Code 17, we've put together a truly remarkable two-day program of international and local speakers digging into front end engineering and development, coming to Melbourne (only) on 3-4 August. Come and join us!  

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.
" ["post_title"]=> string(79) "Video Ristretto: Progressing your Web Apps with Service Worker - Marcos Caceres" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(76) "video-ristretto-progressing-your-web-apps-with-service-worker-marcos-caceres" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-06-14 17:28:32" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-14 07:28:32" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7571" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [12]=> object(WP_Post)#974 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7557) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-06-14 10:10:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-14 00:10:53" ["post_content"]=> string(11248) "Here, at last, is the full program for Web Directions Code 17, taking place in  Melbourne on 3-4 August. Let me tell you, a fair bit of thinking went into this. Getting the participation of some of the world's (and Australia's) leading thinkers and doers in front end engineering is one thing - turning that into a two day event with a coherent structure is another altogether. It's not the kind of opportunity you want to waste - after all, it's not like these seven international keynote speakers come here to Australia on a regular basis. For that matter, it's not like our frankly impressive array of local experts can often be found together in the same place, either. So, it's important we give all of these speakers an opportunity to shine, and all the attendees the chance to take it all in, digest it and see how they can apply it to their own work. Because that's our goal: to give you insights that help you do your job better. As always, we have a great offer for past attendees of our events, you can find the details further down. Here we go. Code Day One. Mavo: HTML re-imagined for the era of Web Apps Lea Verou In an age when it seems everything is developed in JavaScript, using frameworks like Angular and React, what place is there for old fashioned HTML and CSS? Say hello to Mavo. The State of JavaScript in 2017 Brian Terlson The landscape of JavaScript seems to be in constant flux. Not just the frameworks and build tools we use, but the very language itself now that new versions are being released annually. But where is it at right now, in 2017? And where is it headed in the near future? No More Awaiting for Async Functions Erin Zimmer Dealing with asynchronous functions has been a bit of a problem since the early days of JavaScript. Promises help a bit, but they're still limited in some ways. Async functions make writing async code simpler, and let you do some things that aren't so easy with promises. Modules in Motion Damon Oehlman Modularity in web application code has been a topic of much discussion for a long, long time. Implementing solutions that provide a useful approach have consumed many development hours. We are converging on a single solution now in the form of ES6 modules. It's Time to Talk About Type Checkers Ben Teese Static type checkers have been a part of the JavaScript ecosystem for many years now, and with Microsoft, Google and Facebook all having made major investments in tools like TypeScript and Flow, it’s probably fair to say that type checkers are here to stay. Developing the Twitter PWA Zero Cho The most recent version of Twitter's web app, Twitter Lite, was recently released. It's a Progressive Web App, which is fast and responsive, uses less data, takes up less storage space, and supports push notifications and offline use in modern browsers. Preact: Into the Void 0 Jason Miller Grab a hard hat and follow me down into the internals of Preact, a tiny 3kb alternative to React. Along the way we’ll shed light on fundamentals like JSX & Virtual DOM, demystify DOM diffing, and see how keys work up-close. The State of Web Fonts Chris Lilley With CSS Level 3 OpenType font features, the widely adopted WOFF format, Chromatic Fonts, and more recently OpenType variable fonts - a single font file that behaves like multiple fonts - the capabilities opening up for typography on the web are extraordinary. Phew! That's Day One: five international keynotes + three locals. Now brace yourself for Day Two. The Power of the Network Andrew Betts Web developers are increasingly responsible for the performance of the sites they build, and there is now a plethora of advanced tools and services that allow developers to hone front end performance as never before. But the network can still be your biggest bottleneck. The Road to Styled Components: CSS in Component-based Systems Glen Maddern Building user interfaces on the web is hard, because the web, and thus CSS, was inherently made for documents. Because UIs fundamentally are not documents, we've seen a mindset shift towards building component-based systems. A Unified Styling Language Mark Dalgleish In the past few years, we’ve witnessed a massive increase in the amount of CSS experimentation, with ideas like CSS Modules and, controversially, the rise of CSS-in-JS. But does mixing our styles and logic run counter to the original ideas of CSS? Does it break progressive enhancement? Traditional CSS at Scale(?) Mandy Michael When the team at Seven West Media redeveloped The West Australian’s digital platform in a tight 4-month deadline, they embraced the CSS they know and love with a component driven approach. The lessons Mandy learned have led her to the ultimate question: is there a better way? CSS Architectures Q&A MC: John Allsopp Having heard from three of our industry's leading front end developers, let's dive with them into the current and future state of CSS architectures. You can help us get to the heart of one of the front end's most pressing challenges: how do we work with style in today's complex web creations? Artificial Intelligence 101 Patrick Catanzariti Every industry will be affected by AI, machine learning and voice interfaces in the coming years. Terms like "neural networks" and "deep learning" often sound complicated and sci-fi, but there are platforms and technologies out there today that can enable you to do a whole lot out of the box. Making Modern JavaScript Frameworks Accessible Aimee Maree Forsstrom We have seen an increase in projects that require developers who understand accessibility. This leads us to the inevitable question: how do JavaScript frameworks address accessibility? CSS: Current, Soon, Someday Charlotte Jackson Thanks to progressive enhancement, we can make use of many new CSS features, even though not browsers support them. We'll look at examples of CSS that we can use now and what we can use with care. And it's not all about using new CSS; we can all play a part in its development too. Using the Web Payments API Marcos Caceres In this session, Mozilla's Marcos Caceres will provide an overview of the emerging Payment Request and Payment Response browser APIs and how to integrate them into existing HTML forms. Choosing Your Animation Adventure Val Head Animation has come a long way on the modern web and now we have a long list of choices for how to make things move on screen: CSS, JavaScript, SVG, the Web Animation API. With so many options, how can you be sure which is the best choice for your project? And there you have it. There's lots more information on the website about each session and speaker, a complete schedule to see how the timing works on each day, plus various pricing and registration options. It's hard to know what to get more excited about: seven international speakers, 10 locals, all the topics firing front end devs and engineers around the world and a unique Q&A session where you get to pick the brains of three of our leading code specialists. That's probably enough to set your brain spinning at this stage, although we'll tell you more about what we have lined up in coming weeks, including a few special surprises. Don't wait for that to book your tickets, though. We've already sold about 33% of the registrations we have available, and we're still more than two weeks out from the close of our Early Bird offers. Be smart, avoid disappointment, register now. See you in Melbourne." ["post_title"]=> string(39) "The Full Conference Program for Code 17" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "the-full-conference-program-for-code-17" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-06-14 10:10:53" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-14 00:10:53" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7557" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [13]=> object(WP_Post)#975 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7547) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-06-08 18:39:25" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-08 08:39:25" ["post_content"]=> string(9044) "Here it is. The speaker line-up you've been waiting for. We've literally just confirmed our final speakers, so it'll take another couple of days before the Code website has all the details, but here's who's speaking. Web Directions Code 17 Web Directions Code 17 Chris Lilley: The first chair of the CSS Working Group and co-editor of the CSS 2 specification, the inaugural chair of the SVG Working Group and now a Technical Director at W3C. Lea Verou: Lea is well known as a highly engaging speaker on all things front end, the author of CSS Secrets, a long standing member of the CSS Working Group, and has spoken at Web Directions events on several continents. Brian Terlson: Brian, editor of the JavaScript standard, and implementor of the JavaScript engine in the Edge browser will bring us up to date with the current state of JavaScript, as well as where we'll see it head next. Web Directions Code 17 Val Head: Val will survey the full spectrum of animation options from CSS to React Motion and show which are best suited for things like state transitions, showing data, animating illustrations, or making animations responsive. Jason MillerProlific JavaScript developer, architect and Open Sourcerer, the author of Preact, Jason will take us deep into modern browser internals, learning performance and optimisation secrets along the way. Zero ChoZero will give us a sense of the architecture of Twitter Lite, the technologies used, and lessons learned in building the Progressive Web App version of one of the world's most widely used web services. Andrew Betts: Andrew is a web developer and principal developer advocate for Fastly, and is also an elected member of the W3C Technical Architecture Group, a committee that guides the development of the World Wide Web. Andrew will be talking about the power of the network. Erin Zimmer: Erin has been a Senior Front-end Developer on the new DigitaliD project at Australia Post for the last year, after 10 years as a web developer for the federal government in Canberra. Damon Oehlman: Damon is a web application developer who has worked on geospatial applications, WebRTC and now enjoys working on Canva. For a long time he has searched for the one module system to rule them all. Ben Teese: Ben is a senior developer and consultant for Shine Solutions in Melbourne, Australia. He was a Java developer for 10 years before moving on to Ruby and now full-time JavaScript. Glen Maddern: Cyber-intellectual. Creator of Front End Center. Co-creator of styled-components, CSS Modules. Over uses emoji. Mark Dalgleish: Mark is the CSS Modules co-creator, @MelbJS organiser, and DesignOps Lead at @seekjobs. Mandy Michael: Mandy is the Lead Front End Developer at Seven West Media in Western Australia. She is a lover of CSS and Batman and blogs about her adventures in geek fashion. Patrick Catanzariti: Patrick is the founder of Dev Diner, a site that explores developing for emerging tech. He is a SitePoint contributing editor, an instructor at SitePoint Premium and O'Reilly, a Meta Pioneer and freelance developer. Aimee Maree Forsstrom: Spent the past decade consulting on Content Management System builds and in research assistance (Mozilla, Massive Interactive, Southern Cross University, University of Adelaide). Charlotte Jackson: Charlotte is a front-end developer now at Atlassian, and previously at ClearLeft. She's worked on large and small projects for clients including Bike Register, John Lewis and Bravissimo. Marcos Caceres: Marcos works with Mozilla's DOM team hacking on Firefox, writes PWA-related W3C specifications, and co-chairs the W3C's Web Incubator Community Group - all from Melbourne, Australia. That, if we do say so ourselves, is a stunning line-up of speakers: international and local practitioners who are setting the standards for front end engineering now and into the future. This is truly a world class conference, here, in Australia. We'll be telling you more about the topics being addressed in coming weeks, but rest assured we will be tackling the big and important questions about frameworks, raw code, CSS in JS, performance, PWA, security, accessibility, modules, fonts, components, types and a whole lot more. And it won't be all lecture style presentations, either. Expect a few surprises. Really, if you work with front end code, or work with people who do, Code is the conference you do not want to miss. Registration is now open. Code Key Code Dates Thu 15 June: Code Leaders Conference Launch Thu 22 June: Special Announcement (sh, secret) Fri 30 June: Early Bird discounts close Wed 2 August: Code Leaders conference Thu-Fri 3-4 August: Code conference So, come and join us in Melbourne." 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The response so far has been incredible, our thanks to those who've already registered. Please do note that we are limited in how many tickets we can sell by the size of the venue - so it is possible we will sell out. We're two months out, and about 20% of places have been filled. Just so you know. Now. You already know our international keynote speakers include Val Head, Brian Terlson, Lea Verou and Chris Lilley, but we have 13 more speakers lined up for you over the two days, including several more from overseas - two of whom I can confirm now. Jason Miller is Senior Consulting Engineer at Synacor in Toronto, Canada, where he works on a range of web products, specialising  in JavaScript performance analysis & optimisation, web apps, front end architecture, and build tooling. Jason also created Preact, a fast 3kB alternative to React with the same ES6 API. Zero Cho is Software Engineer at Twitter, based in San Francisco, and one of the team that created Twitter Lite, a lighter, faster version of the social media channel, designed for mobile. A key part of the process was working with Progressive Web Apps. That gives us two more Code speakers who are at the global forefront of where our work is headed, engineering products that improve service by improving performance. That's six international keynote speakers at one conference, many of whom you will not see at any other event in Australia.  We're confident we'll be able to confirm our remaining seventh keynote speaker this Thursday, by which time we'll also have decided which of the 50+ submissions from local speakers will join them onstage at Code. Considering both the range of topics covered and the high quality of the proposals, I expect we'll see at least some that don't make it onto the Code program at other events of ours, including the end of year Web Directions Summit. Registrations for Summit will open next week, keep an eye out.   Code 17   You can read a bit about Chris Lilley, Lea Verou, Brian Terlson and Val Head on the website now, but we'll be releasing the full line-up of speakers at Code in our full launch this Thursday 8 June 2017. And Code won't be all lecture style presentations, either. Expect a few surprises. Really, if you work with front end code, or work with people who do, Code is the conference you do not want to miss. Registration is now open.

Key Code Dates

Thu 8 June: Code Conference Launch Thu 15 June: Code Leaders Conference Launch Thu 22 June: Special Announcement (sh, secret) Fri 30 June: Early Bird discounts close Wed 2 August: Code Leaders conference Thu-Fri 3-4 August: Code conference   Code 17   Come and join us for a very special Melbourne event.  " ["post_title"]=> string(25) "Code 17 Conference Update" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(25) "code-17-conference-update" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-06-05 18:19:30" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-06-05 08:19:30" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7539" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } } ["post_count"]=> int(15) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#962 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(7654) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-07-21 15:21:15" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-07-21 05:21:15" ["post_content"]=> string(5186) "Well, that's a fair question. Why are we even hosting this Web Directions AI event in Sydney on 28 September, given that our conferences typically focus on digital design and development, predominantly in a web-based context? Over the last 12 to 18 months, I've been become increasingly aware that adding even a little intelligence to our existing products and services can have surprisingly positive impacts on user experience - and on profitability. That's before we even talk about the new products and services that become possible, feasible and likely with the introduction of new levels of machine intelligence. Web Directions AI is about putting this all squarely in the context of what we currently do and will be doing in the near future. Let me explain. AI What do we mean by AI? When it comes to Artificial Intelligence, we typically think and talk in terms of science fiction, robots and the future. The same goes for the related concepts of Machine Learning and Cognitive Computing. There's a perception that is all future tech. Web Directions AI sets out to dispel this notion, and provide a real world context for what AI is now and will increasingly become. William Gibson came up with a now well-known quote that certainly applies to this: 'The future is already here — it's just not evenly distributed". "Real world"? Really? Like most people, you probably use predictive typing on your phone. Your device's ability to predict the rest of the word you're typing is driven by a form of artificial intelligence. Now imagine predictive typing being removed from your phone. Remove just a little intelligence from one small, but vital aspect of that device, and its usefulness plummets. The original iPhone shipped without even copy and paste functionality, but it did have predictive typing, a use of AI that has become expected and something we wouldn't want to lose. Right now, the role of AI in our digital products and services is limited. My prediction is that in a couple of years, though, designers, developers, UX and CX specialists, information architects, product managers and content strategists who don't embrace and master AI will find themselves left behind. So what's the conference about? Web Directions AI is about helping you to understand the capabilities of the technology today, and how straightforward and inexpensive it can be to add sophisticated AI capabilities to your work. It's about understanding the design opportunities of voice, chat and other "cognitive" technologies, and understanding the business opportunities, decisions and challenges of adopting anything from straightforward sentiment analysis, through triaging incoming support requests, to creating fully fledged intelligent chat interfaces. Web Directions AI uses a format of expert talks, case studies and practical examples along with Q&A discussion opportunities, drawing on the expertise and experience of people doing some amazing work in this area right now. Who should go to this? If you work in the web and digital industry, and you're already thinking about or working with AI technologies, we'll help you get a deeper understanding of the key pillars of the Technology, Business and Design of AI. And if you work in the web and digital industry and you're NOT thinking about AI, we'll show you why you should be, and how. What do I do now? Want to know more? Keen to register? The full program is at the AI conference site. Note that numbers are strictly limited, and we expect tickets to sell pretty quickly now that they are available as of today. The Early Bird price for this new one-day conference is $599. After 1 September, it goes up to $699. I'm really excited about this brand new Web Directions event, focused on an area of technology that I honestly believe will be as significant an opportunity for you, me and all our colleagues as the early days of the web itself. If you need a bit of extra perspective on why I think this becoming such an exciting area for us, I've posted a few current and topical reading suggestions on our website.  " ["post_title"]=> string(68) "Why is Web Directions Holding an Artificial Intelligence Conference?" 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Why is Web Directions Holding an Artificial Intelligence Conference?

Well, that’s a fair question.

Why are we even hosting this Web Directions AI event in Sydney on 28 September, given that our conferences typically focus on digital design and development, predominantly in a web-based context?

Over the last 12 to 18 months, I’ve been become increasingly aware that adding even a little intelligence to … Read more »

John’s AI Reading Links

As we get ready to fully launch our newest conference, Web Directions AI, I’ve pulled together some particularly interesting perspectives on AI for your reading pleasure.

Watch out for an email today with all the details of the one-day conference in Sydney on 28 September.

Cheating at AI

Hopefully, it’s clear by … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Virtual Reality as Used in Our Reality – Aaron Spence

Delivering a conference presentation about the commercial use of virtual reality technology is a pretty thankless task, a bit like trying to demonstrate colour on a black & white television set.

Back at our end of the end of year Direction conference in 2016, Aaron Spence took this on by … Read more »

Direction 16 Wrap: Giving Up By Design – Jennifer Wilson

Back at Direction last year (that’s the one that’s evolving into Summit this year), Jennifer Wilson gave a compelling talk on using gamification to achieve behavioural change in health practices.

One of the examples she used in her presentation was an app developed by her company The Project Factory … Read more »

Web Directions Summit 17 Call For Presentations: Be a Speaker

Our Call For Proposals to present at Summit is now open.

Yes, we curate the conference, but we like to leave room for outstanding, relevant talks from local speakers, experienced or not.

Sessions are 20 minutes long, and open to Australian residents. If you’re successful, we’ll fly you to Sydney, put you … Read more »

First Summit 17 Speakers Announced

With meanings including the highest point of a mountain, a peak of achievement, and a meeting between people on a particular topic, Summit seems a particularly apt new name for our annual Sydney-based summer conference.

Web Directions Summit 17 is where we bring together some of the most renowned and advanced thinkers and practitioners … Read more »

Video of the Week: CSS + SVG: A Designer’s Delight – Sara Soueidan

Sara SoueidanWe’re going back to Respond 16 for our Video of the Week this week, when Sara Soueidan came to visit and delivered an inspiring, eye-opening keynote presentation on what can be done with CSS and SVG working together.

It’s an excellent … Read more »

Video Ristretto: The Things You Can’t Do – Rob Howard

Rob HowardOur short video today is a fascinating one from Code 16, where Rob Howard explored the notion that not all tools, methods, functions or operators are necessarily the best for what you have in mind.

It sounds obvious but … Read more »

Registrations Now Open for Summit Conference in Sydney, November

We’re opening registrations for Web Directions Summit today.

Summit is our new peak annual flagship event at Australian Technology Park in Sydney on 9-10  November, which brings together all the tribes that make up our industry.

Based on the format of the original Web Directions conferences, Summit is two daysRead more »

Code 16: Does Your Web App Speak Schadenfreude? Greg Rewis

Localisation (or localization) is one of those things that seem simple at first glance, but the further you go into it, the more of a rabbit warren you realise it is.

Fortunately, once you’ve worked out what’s needed, it can become a largely automated or at least controlled process and, as … Read more »

Code Leaders 17 Launch

We can see that more and more engineers and developers are moving into positions where they are expected to have and develop managerial skills.

But managing teams of devs can involve unique circumstances and require specialised skills.

That’s why we invented Code Leaders.

Running in conjunction with our long standing, highly regarded Code … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Progressing your Web Apps with Service Worker – Marcos Caceres

Marcos CaceresNow that the full schedule for Code 17 is available, it seems appropriate to acknowledge that there is just one speaker from Code 16 who is back this year: Marcos Caceres.

While this year, Marcos is talking about … Read more »

The Full Conference Program for Code 17

Here, at last, is the full program for Web Directions Code 17, taking place in  Melbourne on 3-4 August.

Let me tell you, a fair bit of thinking went into this. Getting the participation of some of the world’s (and Australia’s) leading thinkers and doers in front end engineering is one thing – turning that … Read more »

The Full Speaker Line-up for Code 17

Here it is. The speaker line-up you’ve been waiting for. We’ve literally just confirmed our final speakers, so it’ll take another couple of days before the Code website has all the details, but here’s who’s speaking.

Web Directions Code 17Read more »

Code 17 Conference Update

A quick update on our Web Directions Code 17 conference  taking place in Melbourne on 3-4 August.

The response so far has been incredible, our thanks to those who’ve already registered. Please do note that we are limited in how many tickets we can sell by the size of … Read more »