object(WP_Query)#499 (51) { ["query"]=> array(1) { ["category_name"]=> string(4) "blog" } ["query_vars"]=> array(64) { ["category_name"]=> string(4) "blog" ["error"]=> string(0) "" ["m"]=> string(0) "" ["p"]=> int(0) ["post_parent"]=> string(0) "" ["subpost"]=> string(0) "" ["subpost_id"]=> string(0) "" ["attachment"]=> string(0) "" ["attachment_id"]=> int(0) ["name"]=> string(0) "" ["static"]=> string(0) "" ["pagename"]=> string(0) "" ["page_id"]=> int(0) ["second"]=> string(0) "" ["minute"]=> string(0) "" ["hour"]=> string(0) "" ["day"]=> int(0) ["monthnum"]=> int(0) ["year"]=> int(0) ["w"]=> int(0) ["tag"]=> string(0) "" ["cat"]=> int(1) ["tag_id"]=> string(0) "" ["author"]=> string(0) "" ["author_name"]=> string(0) "" ["feed"]=> string(0) "" ["tb"]=> string(0) "" ["paged"]=> int(0) ["meta_key"]=> string(0) "" ["meta_value"]=> string(0) "" ["preview"]=> string(0) "" ["s"]=> string(0) "" ["sentence"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["fields"]=> string(0) "" ["menu_order"]=> string(0) "" ["embed"]=> string(0) "" ["category__in"]=> array(0) { } ["category__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["category__and"]=> array(0) { } ["post__in"]=> array(0) { } ["post__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["post_name__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__and"]=> array(0) { } ["tag_slug__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag_slug__and"]=> array(0) { } ["post_parent__in"]=> array(0) { } ["post_parent__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["author__in"]=> array(0) { } ["author__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=> bool(false) ["suppress_filters"]=> bool(false) ["cache_results"]=> bool(true) ["update_post_term_cache"]=> bool(true) ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=> bool(true) ["update_post_meta_cache"]=> bool(true) ["post_type"]=> string(0) "" ["posts_per_page"]=> int(15) ["nopaging"]=> bool(false) ["comments_per_page"]=> string(2) "50" ["no_found_rows"]=> bool(false) ["order"]=> string(4) "DESC" } ["tax_query"]=> object(WP_Tax_Query)#221 (6) { ["queries"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(5) { ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["terms"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(4) "blog" } ["field"]=> string(4) "slug" ["operator"]=> string(2) "IN" ["include_children"]=> bool(true) } } ["relation"]=> string(3) "AND" ["table_aliases":protected]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(21) "wp_term_relationships" } ["queried_terms"]=> array(1) { ["category"]=> array(2) { ["terms"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(4) "blog" } ["field"]=> string(4) "slug" } } ["primary_table"]=> string(8) "wp_posts" ["primary_id_column"]=> string(2) "ID" } ["meta_query"]=> object(WP_Meta_Query)#222 (9) { ["queries"]=> array(0) { } ["relation"]=> NULL ["meta_table"]=> NULL ["meta_id_column"]=> NULL ["primary_table"]=> NULL ["primary_id_column"]=> NULL ["table_aliases":protected]=> array(0) { } ["clauses":protected]=> array(0) { } ["has_or_relation":protected]=> bool(false) } ["date_query"]=> bool(false) ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_Term)#133 (17) { ["term_id"]=> int(1) ["name"]=> string(4) "Blog" ["slug"]=> string(4) "blog" ["term_group"]=> int(0) ["term_taxonomy_id"]=> int(1) ["taxonomy"]=> string(8) "category" ["description"]=> string(0) "" ["parent"]=> int(0) ["count"]=> int(729) ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["term_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["cat_ID"]=> int(1) ["category_count"]=> int(729) ["category_description"]=> string(0) "" ["cat_name"]=> string(4) "Blog" ["category_nicename"]=> string(4) "blog" ["category_parent"]=> int(0) } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(1) ["request"]=> string(342) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 15" ["posts"]=> &array(15) { [0]=> object(WP_Post)#219 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6558) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-30 14:24:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-30 04:24:26" ["post_content"]=> string(2451) "Hannah Donovan's keynote from Web Directions 2015 focused on a yet another topic that is only getting increasing attention - how humans will balance their roles with machines when it comes to generating, managing and publishing web content. Hannah crash tackles this topic with her typically colourful, brash and uncompromising approach but also brings some deep considerations to what it all means. Take a look at the video, and then think about signing up for Direction 16, where this area crosses over into several presentations. Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(85) "Video of the Week: Hannah Donovan - Souls & Machines: Designing the Future of Content" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "video-week-hannah-donovan-souls-machines-designing-future-content" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-30 14:27:32" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-30 04:27:32" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6558" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#218 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6553) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-28 11:10:40" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-28 01:10:40" ["post_content"]=> string(2974) "Robert TiltOur short video this week comes from WD15 and features Robert Tilt, Interactive Lead at Isobar Australia, on the evolution of Virtual Reality. That evolution is picking up pace lately, and it's already clear VR will be big, a game-changer. But what about the content? In this talk, Rob shares the unique challenges and experiences that come with creating multi-sensory experiences in the virtual and physical worlds. It's a perfect leadup to our coverage of VR at Direction 2016. Our upcoming conference Direction is full of incredible insights for digital product designers, owners and managers just like this. So why haven't you signed up yet? directionad

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Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(59) "Video Ristretto: Robert Tilt - VR: discovering a new medium" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(53) "video-ristretto-robert-tilt-vr-discovering-new-medium" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-28 11:10:40" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-28 01:10:40" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6553" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#217 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6550) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-27 12:21:09" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-27 02:21:09" ["post_content"]=> string(3596) "As we head toward Direction, we'll be focusing on some of the sessions we're looking forward to and providing some context for why we chose these particular sessions. First up, one of our core points of focus since the very beginning – where is the design of the Web headed? At various times in the history of the Web, it has felt like we've reached a plateau of designing for this medium. The mid-1990s was the era of "killer Web sites", driven by tables-based layouts, spacer gifs, and text rendered as images. The standards based, three-column "one true layout" ruled the mid-2000s. And today’s sites are driven by, dare I say it, Bootstrap inspired, minimalist-text-over-hero-image driven designs. These days we have all the fonts we might possibly want. The resolution of our screens is high enough that they're effectively as high density as paper. We have animations, SVG for vector art, an entire toolkit almost undreamt of back in 2004. And yet, as the joke goes, "Which of these two web sites are you designing?" The cycle seems to be: let's imagine what's possible, then develop hacks around the limitations of current Web technologies to make it possible, then advocate for a standards based solution to "pave our cow paths". This is how table-based layouts with spacer gifs came to pass, as well as the use of float for layouts, images for text with image replacement techniques, and JavaScript based animation. These are the "cow paths" that standards and browser developers look to pave. So, where are we now? And, more importantly, what comes next? Well, two of our key presenters will be addressing precisely this at Direction. If you design and develop for the Web, these sessions will be utterly invaluable in charting the direction of our work over the coming months and years. Matt Griffin knows a lot about the history, and importantly the future, of designing for the Web. In his recently released documentary, "What Comes Next is the Future", he interviewed dozens of leading designers and developers to attempt to understand where the Web is headed. We're incredibly excited to be hosting the Australian Premiere of this documentary the night before the Direction conference proper, for all Silver and Gold ticket holders. But Matt will also present a session at Direction that captures much of this thinking and helps chart a course forward as we design for the Web. Andy Clarke (one of those interviewed for the documentary) is part of this history, but also still very much at the forefront of those shaping the design of the Web. He keynoted our very first Web Directions conference, and we're privileged to have him return to explore how art direction can make designs that are visually distinctive and more effective by using design to communicate the essence and purpose of content, taking advantage of new and under-appreciated capabilities in our browsers. One of our underpinning philosophies when curating our conferences is that every session is – for at least some of the audience – sufficiently valuable that it alone is worth attending the conference for. We feel these sessions each very much meet that criteria. If the design of the Web, in the broadest sense, is central to what you do, then don't miss Direction, which includes not only these sessions, but also 15 others – hand-picked by us to help you deliver the best possible Web experiences.    " ["post_title"]=> string(66) "Approaching Direction 2016 - Where's the Design of the Web Headed?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(51) "approaching-direction-2016-wheres-design-web-headed" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-27 12:22:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-27 02:22:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6550" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#216 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6546) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-26 10:30:34" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-26 00:30:34" ["post_content"]=> string(9554) "At our Code 2016 conference a couple of months ago, Progressive Web Apps received quite a bit of attention. Marcos Caceres talked about how they are enabled by Service Workers, Elise Chant showed us how to use Manifests to install them, and several presenters referred to PWA in their presentations. You might remember that PWAs were introduced as a concept by Alex Russell back at Web Directions 2015, so we figured it would be a good idea to use Scroll Magazine to put Progressive Web Apps in perspective.

Progressive Web Apps for everyone

By John Allsopp The launch of the iPhone in 2007 was a watershed moment in modern technology, for all manner of reasons, but I want to focus on one particular aspect: its impact on the Web. Back in the 1990s, those of us thinking about the future of Web design were already imagining a genuinely mobile Web. No small part of the impetus behind CSS, and the then radical "standards based" approach to Web development, revolved around the realisation that the Web wasn't going to be desktop-only for ever (even if, at the time, laptop computers were rare and expensive, wi-fi non-existent, and accessing even email via a mobile phone was considered Jetsons-like futuristic). The iPhone changed all that, despite in many ways being worse than the phones that came before it: slower CPUs, slower networks (2G only!), no physical keyboard. And as hard as it is to imagine now, it had no apps. So, why did it succeed? My largely-impossible-to-verify speculation is that it was in no small part because it was the first genuinely usable mobile Web experience, and this set it apart from all other mobile devices at the time. Almost no-one before had even tried - let alone come close to - making the mobile Web experience not totally suck. Apple did an end-run around these previous efforts. Controversially (among the handful of people aware of CSS media types at the time) it didn't support the mobile media type in CSS, choosing rather to present the full web page, rendered into a theoretical 960px wide window and scaling the page to fit the 'real' viewport width of 320px. I'd argue that the Web was critically important to the success of the iPhone, and the relationship between the two over the intervening nine years is instructive, and might point to the future of the Web. That future looked, for many, kind of shaky not all that long ago. Indeed, some like Alex Russell - to whom we'll return in a moment - argue that now is very much a watershed moment in the Web's history. Apple's interest in moving the Web forward, highly evident in the period between 2003 and around 2009 as they released a brand new best-of-breed browser – Safari – implemented then proposed as standards many of the features we now take for granted in modern web design (CSS animations, transitions, transforms, gradients, Web Fonts among many others), has slowed to a trickle. Apple took years to adopt IndexedDB, among many other important Web technologies, and while all other browsers adopted an "evergreen" approach of continual improvement and automatic updating of both desktop and mobile browsers, Apple seemed stuck on an upgrade cycle for their browsers which marched in lock step with their Operating Systems, and ran in the order of years not weeks. As the iOS App Store added more and more apps – they now number in the millions – the Web seemed less and less important to Apple (the same is not untrue of Android, too) and, indeed, to the future of computing. Web Apps were widely considered slow and 'janky', and lacked access to many of the device capabilities native apps could tap into that made Web content look endangered in the world of shiny 60FPS apps, with their access to the underlying device APIs and features, and - importantly – ability to be easily installed on the user's home screen. Meanwhile, Android is also an important part of this story. Coming from a company whose DNA was the Web, hope might have been had that Android would pick up the mantle, and make the Web a first class citizen. But Android increasingly went toe-to-toe with iPhone and the stock Android browser became increasingly outdated, even as Google was instrumental in moving the Web forward through Chrome. Usage rates for the Web in comparison with native mobile apps fell, the importance of mobile computing rose and Wired famously declared the Web to be dead. But. A funny thing happened on the way to the funeral. All along, Google had been acquiring a team of smart, deeply experienced Web-native people, people who cared deeply about the Web, people exemplified by (although he's far from alone) Alex Russell. Alex, who helped give the world Dojo, one of the earliest richly featured JavaScript frameworks, and ChromeFrame, an ingenious approach to getting a modern Web rendering engine into older Internet Explorer versions using ActiveX. Folks like Alex, and Domenic Denicola, and many others at Google never lost faith in the Web. Along with others at browser vendors like Mozilla and Opera and framework developers like Ember and elsewhere, these folks thought long and hard about what worked and what didn't when it comes to moving the Web platform forward in an age of sophisticated native platforms like iOS and Android. They gathered and published their thoughts in the 'Extensible Web Manifesto'. And over the last 12 months or so we've really started to see the fruits of this way of thinking, under the moniker of "Progressive Web Apps". Alex kicked this phase off when he published "Progressive Web Apps, escaping tabs without losing our soul", and a few weeks later we were fortunate to have him open our Code 2015 conference with a keynote that expanded on these ideas. The last 12 months has really seen these ideas start to become very much part of the everyday life of front end developers. Service worker is reaching a level of maturity in Chrome, and increasingly Mozilla, has strong interest from the Edge team at Microsoft, and even cautious public interest from the Webkit team. Other pieces of the puzzle, including push notifications, and Web Manifests (not to be confused with AppCache!) are becoming usable. And more importantly still, a pattern for developing Web apps that are progressive, that start life in the browser tab, and potentially migrate onto the user's home screen has emerged. Suddenly, I feel a renewed optimism for the Web, not simply that it can keep up with or compete with native, but that it can continue to embody the "webbiness" central to its success and importance. The technologies that enable this new approach to Web development are maturing, and the philosophies and users’ mental models are still emerging, but it is a time of tremendous opportunity and promise. If you're not already exploring Web Manifests, Service Workers, and Push notifications, these are low barrier to entry technologies that can be used to progressively improve your sites and apps today, even as we wait for their full adoption. These are exciting times, full of promise and opportunity, and they don't come around very often. The emergence of CSS in the late 1990s, Ajax, jQuery and a more application-like Web experience in the early 2000s, mobile in the late part of the 2000s – just a small number of similar revolutionary shifts come to mind. Don't waste this opportunity. directionad

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Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Idea of the Week: Progressive Web Apps" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(30) "idea-week-progressive-web-apps" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-26 10:33:41" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-26 00:33:41" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6546" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#215 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6542) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-23 10:30:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-23 00:30:53" ["post_content"]=> string(2536) "Last week's Video of the Week of Maciej Cegłowski at Web Directions 2015 proved so popular, and we're so excited that this bloke will be presenting again at Direction this year, we dug back into the archives to turn up another of his landmark talks, this time at Web Directions 2013. Yeah, that title gets you interested, doesn't it? So will the video. Don't take my word for it, find a bit of time to take it in yourself. When that's whetted your appetite for what Maciej will bring to Sydney this year in talking about chatbots, AI and our big data future, come and sign up for Direction 16. Our upcoming conference Direction is full of incredible insights for digital product designers, owners and managers just like this. So why haven't you signed up yet? directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(75) "Video Ristretto: Rose Matthews - Financial Inclusion in the Solomon Islands" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "video-ristretto-rose-matthews-financial-inclusion-solomon-islands" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-22 09:49:14" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-21 23:49:14" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6536" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#213 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6509) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-21 10:36:22" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-21 00:36:22" ["post_content"]=> string(1337) "Wrap Code cover Most of you will know by now that we have been producing Scroll magazine to accompany our conferences, but not everyone might know we also produce a post-conference magazine called Wrap. The idea of Wrap is to summarise all the speaker presentations at a conference, complete with links to slides, websites, further reading and extra resources. We also like to include some bonus articles, photos and some surprises. As you can imagine, this is actually quite a tricky task, and we're still working how to do it so it's accurate, comprehensive, interesting and usable - but also timely. We still have work to do with that last factor, but right now we can announce that our third effort, Wrap: Code, is now ready to download. Wrap Code Rachel Andrew" ["post_title"]=> string(17) "Wrap #03: Code 16" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(15) "wrap-03-code-16" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-21 10:36:22" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-21 00:36:22" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6509" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#212 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6528) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-19 11:03:36" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-19 01:03:36" ["post_content"]=> string(7240) "Alicia SedlockAt our Code 16 conference, Alicia Sedlock gave a very popular presentation on testing - not, you might think, the most rivetting subject but one made practical and accessible by Alicia. It probably didn't hurt that Alicia featured a few snaps of her favourite companion, Mabel the hedgehog. Here's the interview we conducted with Alicia (but not Mabel) for Scroll Magazine before the conference. Q What made you decide you could do this for a living? A Well, the glamourous way it all began was sitting on my parents’ Dell PC making custom LiveJournal and MySpace layouts. Seriously. I thought I’d end up being able to make layouts for famous Internet personae and make a lot of money doing it. That’s what sparked my initial web development interests, which inspired me to sign up for my high school’s Intro to Web Design elective. It was a half year elective that opened me up to what HTML really was, how CSS works, and how to do animations and interactivity in Flash. I went on to sign up for the full year course in my junior year, and as independent study in my senior year, and ended up majoring in Web Design and Interactive Media in college. I was always a creator at heart (don’t even ask me how many art mediums I’ve tried to pick up) and web development stuck, for some reason. Q Have you ever coded live on stage, or in front of an audience? How did it go? A I recently attempted my first live code talk at my work, giving a Lunch & Learn talk to our development team about CSS flex and grid layouts. I thought, “I know this fairly well, I’ll just dive right in!” Turns out, that didn’t work too well. Debugging on a giant projector is somehow even more nerve wracking than anything I’ve done in front of a group before. Q How do you further develop and extend your skills? Books, courses? Noodling by yourself? A I follow a lot of people on Twitter. A lot. And even though it’ll take me all day to catch up on my timeline, I get exposed to a lot of new and upcoming things - SVG, React, animations, accessibility, new web standards, you name it. I essentially use it as a filter, so that when a topic comes across the feed that I’m excited about, I have a place to start digging in. I end up reading a lot of blog posts, forking a lot of pens on CodePen, messing around with them, then building something small and dinky to get my teeth into something. Q Is it better to learn HTML then CSS then JavaScript, or JavaScript then HTML then CSS, or all three at once, or something else? A I think it depends on what your goals are for learning. If your goal is to have a visual interface that you can interact with to do cool things, then getting a handle on HTML/CSS before JavaScript might be the better approach. If you don’t care about interfaces and simply want to punch out crazy computations or algorithms, perhaps learning JavaScript first would get you there. I’d say it’s a case-by-case basis. Q What's the best way to get more women coding? A There are already a lot of women in programming. It’s about how do we keep them from leaving the industry, which requires looking at the hard truth about why women leave the industry. Lack of work life balance, lack of support for new mothers, and then, you know, the constant harassment and abuse many women experience throughout their careers, both online and in their workplaces. So if we want to keep women in the industry, we need to address these types of systemic issues right where they are - in our workplaces, our open source communities, our conferences. Q Frameworks. What's your take? Are they good, bad or does it depend on how you use them? A It absolutely depends on how and why you use them. The impression I get these days is that many developers are looking for THE framework, the framework that they’ll use for every project for the rest of their days. If they work on one particular kind of application, and make that same application over and over again, then maybe that can be a reality. But every framework has their upsides and downsides, so for the majority of us, it’ll never be that easy. Developers need to really look at frameworks and say, “What is this really giving me that I can’t live without? What problems am I facing that this framework solves that I can’t solve without it?” I’d say the mentality of “always use a framework” is more dangerous than the frameworks themselves. Q Tabs or spaces? A Soft tabs. Fight me. Q What's on your horizon? A To be quite honest, I’m not really sure. None of my career thus far has been part of a long-term plan. I only end up making decisions as opportunities arise. However, the one thing I would like to achieve eventually is to make a game that works in the browser, and on all devices. directionad

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" ["post_title"]=> string(30) "Monday Profile: Alicia Sedlock" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "monday-profile-alicia-sedlock" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-19 11:04:26" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-19 01:04:26" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6528" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#211 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6524) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-16 11:05:35" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-16 01:05:35" ["post_content"]=> string(3027) "Performance was a big theme for our Web Directions conference in 2015, so it was appropriate that the closing keynote to our last conference in that format was delivered by Maciej Cegłowski, addressing the way our websites have grown in size to the point where performance and the user experience are seen to deteriorate. Performance is still an important theme and a big (!) problem for web designers, developers, content strategists, users - in fact, everyone on the web. That would be reason enough to revisit Maciej's talk, but the extra incentive is that this presentation is in turns hilarious, horrifying, eye-opening and maybe a bit scary. More than 100,000 people have viewed this video and if that doesn't include you, we really urge you to take the time to see what everyone else found so fascinating. You won't regret it. More than likely, it'll make you want to sign up to Direction 16, where we have a day full of presentations with this kind of impact, and best of all, Maciej returns with his own inimitable, incisive, and yet hilarious take on chatbots, AI and our big data future. Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Video of the Week - Maciej Cegłowski: the Website Obesity Crisis" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(27) "video-week-maciej-ceglowski" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-16 11:05:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-16 01:05:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6524" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#210 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6500) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-14 11:38:34" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-14 01:38:34" ["post_content"]=> string(3204) "Communication is difficult. Whether it’s between humans or machines or a combination of the two, trying to translate meaningful information is a lossy process. Converting programming languages to use the new Unicode standard is hard, but once it's in place, you get this marvellous feature-add: Emoji compatibility. No longer do we have to make faces with symbols, or be forced to platform-specific emoticons! Rejoice in the extended character set! At this year's Code conference, Operations Engineer Katie McLaughlin took us through the rich (albeit brief, as yet) history of emoji, how they have been adopted and adapted to various platforms and how they reached their current peak of popularity. From the technical to the social aspects, mojibake and UTF-8, this talk will cover why the extended character set provided by the Unicode standard needs to be treated with responsibility by users and platforms alike. Our upcoming conference Direction is full of incredible insights for digital product designers, owners and managers just like this. So why haven't you signed up yet? directionad

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" ["post_title"]=> string(96) "Video Ristretto: Katie McLaughlin - The Power ⚡️ and Responsibility 😓 of Unicode Adoption" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(70) "video-ristretto-katie-mclaughlin-power-responsibility-unicode-adoption" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-14 11:54:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-14 01:54:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6500" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#209 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6494) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-13 10:30:04" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-13 00:30:04" ["post_content"]=> string(6923) "10th anniversaryWe're counting down to Direction, our big end of year conference, the 10th anniversary of our very first event. For this year we've made some changes (while keeping to the essence of the event thousands of attendees over the last decade have found so engaging and valuable). We'd love you to join us, as we set sail for the next exciting decade. Long-time (and even more recent) attendees of Web Directions will probably have noticed a few changes across all the various activities we run. But none is bigger than the (r)evolution of our major annual event, which for the last decade since it started in 2006 has been known as Web Directions. Way back then, our focus was almost entirely on Web design and our audience was that many-hatted expert of all things Web, from HTML and CSS to visual design, usability and accessibility, content, SEO and much more besides. But just as the Web, and the community of professionals around this core technology have changed profoundly in the last decade, we've changed too. We added tracks to help those specialising in specific areas of practice develop their knowledge and skills. And we found, over time, that it was the ideas that ran across specialisations that particularly engaged and energised our audience. Over the decade, and particularly in recent years, we've developed new conferences focusing on specific areas of practice, like Code for front-end engineering, Respond for web and interaction design, and most recently this year Transform, focusing on the revolution occurring around the world in Government Services Delivery. All these will continue — and, indeed, grow — into the future. As we turned toward the second decade of Web Directions, we spent a lot of time (and I mean a lot) thinking about the role of our "big" event. From its name (we've felt for a while now the word "Web" is limited in its reach and appeal, backed up by emails from people who've told us their boss won't send them to a "Web Design" conference), to how many tracks it would comprise, to the overall focus of the event. And so, after a lot of consideration, and many conversations with people close to the events,  was (re)born — Direction. The name both links to our past and looks to the future. The choice of the singular "Direction" over the plural "Directions" was very deliberate, and aims to capture the key mission of the event. When we know where we want to go, we ask for directions. But on the bigger journeys of our life, both personal and professional, there is no single destination, no one specific place we are looking to go. Rather, there's an overall direction in which we are headed. And it's that choice of direction that this event is all about. This idea is for me captured poignantly in Robert Frost's perhaps too-often quoted poem "The Road Not Taken"
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.
Each of us likely has a story of paths taken and not: junctures in our lives, personal and professional. Those of us who work in and on the Web, and at the intersection of design and technology, almost certainly did not follow the sorts of paths associated with more traditional professions and careers. Our 'field' (a term too constrained to describe the landscape we inhabit) continues to evolve (we continue to evolve it). The novel ideas and skills and techniques we learned last year become "table stakes", even obsolete – replaced, superseded or subsumed by what comes next. And keeping up is both exciting and challenging. This restlessness almost defines our field. At the heart of our events (and everything else we've done over the last decade and more, and at the heart of my own writing, speaking, and even the software I've written over the last 20 years) has been the effort to make sense of where we are, and where we are going. I think this is in no small part why such ground breaking, and diverse ideas as OOCSS (first introduced to the world by a then little known Nicole Sullivan at Web Directions North in 2009) and "The New Aesthetic" (an idea originally outlined by James Bridle at Web Directions South 2012), alongside now world renowned speakers who first spoke at our events, have originated at our conferences. We spend a significant part of our lives here thinking about these divergent roads, and finding ways to introduce them to our audience. And it's this that's the animating focus of Direction. Not a prescriptive "here are the things you should be doing", not directions to get you from A to B, but ideas about which direction to take, about where our field at the intersection of design, the Web and technology seems to be going. Over the next two months, as we lead up to the 10th anniversary of our first event, and the first Direction conference (which will also be very familiar in many ways from previous Web Directions you've been to) I'll be going into more detail about the sessions we've programmed, and my thinking behind what interested me about the ideas, and the experts delivering them, and how all this fits into the broader themes and patterns and trends I see emerging in our field. But if there's a theme, among others that will emerge in the coming weeks and at the conference, it's that we don't face that fork in the road just once in our careers in this field: we face these choices, in large ways and small, over and over. And when we choose a path, it's also to the exclusion of the road not taken, so these choices really do matter, they shape our lives, sometimes a little, and sometimes much more. Which is an enormous privilege that we have – in many other fields, the choices and opportunities are far more constrained. But there's no doubt it can be challenging to face this constant change, the incessant requirement to keep up with currents of practice, with technologies and ideas. The phrase "I'm too old for this" passes my lips perhaps bit too frequently. But then I look to the work emerging where design and technology meet, on the Web, with physical objects, in the built environment, and the excitement overcomes my anxiety, as I'm sure it does for you. And ironically, it keeps me young. Direction is all about that excitement, helping fuel it, through amazing presentations, and experiences outside the theatre, and channel it toward what comes next. I can't wait for it to come around, and to share it with you." ["post_title"]=> string(25) "Countdown to Direction 16" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "countdown-direction-16" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-13 10:39:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-13 00:39:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6494" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [11]=> object(WP_Post)#208 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6487) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-12 10:06:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-12 00:06:53" ["post_content"]=> string(6157) "Greg RewisOur series of interviews with conference speakers for Scroll Magazine has proven very popular, both for the insights each has given into that particular speaker but also how they compare to each other. This week, we profile Greg Rewis, speaker at Code 16. For another perspective, later in the week you can also see the video interview I conducted with Greg. Q: What made you decide you could do this for a living? A: I actually kind of tripped into my career. I was working in the late 80s in Denmark at a newspaper and magazine publisher as a journalist. And one day, some boxes containing some Mac IIfx computers showed up. I was the only one in the office that had any experience on a Mac, so I went about setting them up, installing software (QuarkXPress 1.12 and Illustrator 88!), and showing my colleagues how to work them. Any time someone would get stuck, I ended up being the person they called. Needless to say, my career as a journalist quickly turned into my career in IT. Through that transition, I began thinking about the software we were using to create our publications, which took me to the first MacWorld in Berlin. I had the good fortune to talk with a couple of developers out of Hamburg who were building a publishing system based around QuarkXPress. A few conversations later and a trip to Hamburg and I had a new job as the product manager for their publishing system. A few years later, we began working on a project to mark up the stories in the database for re-use on things like CD-ROMs. That little project turned into one of the first HTML authoring tools, originally named GoLive, which would become GoLive Cyberstudio, and eventually Adobe GoLive. After Adobe’s acquisition of GoLive, I “defected” to Macromedia to help build Dreamweaver. Of course, the joke was on me, as Macromedia was eventually acquired by Adobe. As a product manager, you have an opportunity to do presentations. And I ended up, not only liking to do presentations, but actually being really good at it! So somewhere along the line, I transitioned to being a full time developer evangelist.   Q: Have you ever coded live on stage, or in front of an audience? How did it go? A: All the time. I actually really enjoy live coding, as I think it helps establish credibility. As a developer evangelist, it’s important that the audience understands that I really do know what I’m talking about and I’m not simply doing a marketing or sales pitch. And, at least for me, live coding helps with that. The one key is that the coding actually accomplishes something — in other words, I’m doing it so that I can simultaneously explain something without having someone “read ahead” on a slide.   Q: How do you further develop and extend your skills? Books, courses? Noodling by yourself? A: A large part of my job is “noodling”. In fact, that’s how almost every demo I’ve ever done has come about. Whenever I’m learning something new, I try to think “what could I build”? As an example, when I joined Salesforce and began learning the platform, I immediately pulled out an old project built on a different technology stack and thought “how could I rebuild this for Salesforce”. I find that building my own project helps me learn faster than simply doing someone else’s tutorial.   Q: Is it better to learn HTML then CSS then JavaScript, or JavaScript then HTML then CSS, or all three at once, or something else? A: On the question of HTML or CSS, I think they should probably be learned together, because without CSS, HTML is pretty boring. And although there are roles in which you only need HTML and CSS, I think most front-end roles today also require a good understanding of JavaScript. The important thing about learning JavaScript is to learn JavaScript, and not a framework or library. I know a lot of developers that started with jQuery, and that’s fine. But even if you are using jQuery (or Angular/React/Backbone/etc), it behoves you to understand the plain vanilla JavaScript. Because at the end of the day, even if you are “writing jQuery”, you’re still writing JavaScript.   Q: What's the best way to get more women coding? A: The simple answer is to get them interested. But doing that means that we have to do two things. The first is to break down the typical nerd or geek stereotype in a way that makes young girls think “I could see myself doing that”. Having the typical image of a developer being someone who is socially awkward, with no sense of style, would make even a younger me not want to pursue that job! The other — and perhaps much harder — challenge is to craft an environment where those girls and women who choose to become developers feel safe and welcome. No one wants to work in a hostile environment, but that is what many women in the industry feel about working as developers.   Q: Frameworks. What's your take? Are they good, bad or does it depend on how you use them? A: Frameworks can be awesome — but they also can be a crutch. The important thing, as I mentioned before, is that you know how to survive without them. I once saw someone include jQuery in order to do something that could’ve been achieved in less than 10 lines of plain JavaScript.   Q: Tabs or spaces? A: For? It’s actually quite simple. Tabs are for indentation, spaces separate words.   Q: What's on your horizon? A: Setting off to sail around the world … in 5 years. But before that, continuing to learn and grow as a developer. It’s really awesome (and tiring) to be in an industry that is growing and changing so quickly.   " ["post_title"]=> string(26) "Monday Profile: Greg Rewis" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(25) "monday-profile-greg-rewis" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-12 10:06:53" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-12 00:06:53" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6487" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [12]=> object(WP_Post)#207 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6483) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-09 11:46:54" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-09 01:46:54" ["post_content"]=> string(2833) "At Direction 16, coming up in he middle of November, we're really fortunate to have a number of our most popular speakers from the last decade returning to help us set a course for the next. So in the coming weeks we'll be reprising some of the most engaging presentations from recent years, including many form last year's Web Directions. We're kicking off with Josh Clark, who'll be back to open Direction '16, and deliver a masterclass. Back in 2013 he delivered the classic "buttons are a hack", still highly relevant, as it challenges us to rethink the metaphors we use when designing interfaces, which often constrain the solutions we develop. If you're anywhere near Australia, why not get along to Direction 16, and Josh's masterclass "Designing exceptional mobile experiences"? Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(50) "Video of the Week: Josh Clark–buttons are a hack" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(34) "video-week-josh-clark-buttons-hack" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-09 11:46:54" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-09 01:46:54" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6483" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [13]=> object(WP_Post)#206 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6475) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 13:23:44" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 03:23:44" ["post_content"]=> string(3958) "cropped-for-blogpost It's great to be back with a new round of "A Dao of the Web" interviews. If you missed some of the earlier ones, I recently chatted with several of the speakers from our Respond conference, including Ethan Marcotte, Karen McGrane, Sara Soueidan, Russ Weakley, Jen Simmons, Rachel Simpson. This week we start with a number of conversations I recorded with speakers at Code. First up is Tim Kadlec, who we also profiled for Scroll magazine recently. Sadly, it was the very first time I used my new camera, with an advertised 29 minutes and 59 seconds of recording time, but which seems to stop after around 16 minutes (suspiciously all the recorded files seem to be exactly the same size, so I think file size rather than recording time might be the hard limit on recording), which I only worked out after we'd finished. So we left a lot of interesting stuff in the ether. Luckily for the subsequent conversations I took this into account. I think the 16 minutes we did have is well worth publishing. We talked about Tim's career history, the role of writing and presenting in becoming an expert (rather than the other way round) and more. Please enjoy this sadly truncated conversation, and why not jump on our mailing list to be the first to hear when we publish conversations in coming weeks with Yoav Weiss, Alicia Sedlock, Steph and Greg Rewis and Rachel Andrew? Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Video: In conversation with Tim Kadlec" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "video-conversation-tim-kadlec" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 13:23:44" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 03:23:44" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6475" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [14]=> object(WP_Post)#138 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6467) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-07 13:45:37" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-07 03:45:37" ["post_content"]=> string(2981) "With digital products, the saying "you never get a second chance at a first impression" is a cold hard fact. There are many hurdles that prevent a potential user from becoming a passionate user and the way that you onboard them to your product can make or break it. Cameron Adams, who has spoken many times at our conferences, is now Chief Product Officer at Canva, who back last year when he spoke at Web Directions was approaching 5 million users (they've now passed 10 million), and they've learned a thing or two about converting the interested into the engaged. Here Cam shares some of their secrets, things you should do and things you should definitely not do to create an engaged user base. Our upcoming conference Direction is full of incredible insights for digital product designers, owners and managers just like this. So why haven't you signed up yet? directionad

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" ["post_title"]=> string(100) "Video Ristretto: Cameron Adams–Onboarding at Canva, from Zero to Four Ten Million" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(25) "video-ristretto-cam-adams" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-07 14:02:04" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-07 04:02:04" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6467" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } } ["post_count"]=> int(15) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#219 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6558) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-30 14:24:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-30 04:24:26" ["post_content"]=> string(2451) "Hannah Donovan's keynote from Web Directions 2015 focused on a yet another topic that is only getting increasing attention - how humans will balance their roles with machines when it comes to generating, managing and publishing web content. Hannah crash tackles this topic with her typically colourful, brash and uncompromising approach but also brings some deep considerations to what it all means. Take a look at the video, and then think about signing up for Direction 16, where this area crosses over into several presentations. Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
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Video of the Week: Hannah Donovan – Souls & Machines: Designing the Future of Content

Hannah Donovan’s keynote from Web Directions 2015 focused on a yet another topic that is only getting increasing attention – how humans will balance their roles with machines when it comes to generating, managing and publishing web content.

Hannah crash tackles this topic with her typically colourful, brash and uncompromising approach … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Robert Tilt – VR: discovering a new medium

Robert TiltOur short video this week comes from WD15 and features Robert Tilt, Interactive Lead at Isobar Australia, on the evolution of Virtual Reality. That evolution is picking up pace lately, and it’s already clear VR will be big, a game-changer.

But … Read more »

Approaching Direction 2016 – Where’s the Design of the Web Headed?

As we head toward Direction, we’ll be focusing on some of the sessions we’re looking forward to and providing some context for why we chose these particular sessions.

First up, one of our core points of focus since the very beginning – where is the design of the Web headed?

At … Read more »

Idea of the Week: Progressive Web Apps

At our Code 2016 conference a couple of months ago, Progressive Web Apps received quite a bit of attention. Marcos Caceres talked about how they are enabled by Service Workers, Elise Chant showed us how to use Manifests to install them, and several presenters referred to PWA in their … Read more »

Video of the Week – Maciej Cegłowski: Barely Succeed! It’s Easier!

Last week’s Video of the Week of Maciej Cegłowski at Web Directions 2015 proved so popular, and we’re so excited that this bloke will be presenting again at Direction this year, we dug back into the archives to turn up another of his landmark talks, this time at Web Directions … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Rose Matthews – Financial Inclusion in the Solomon Islands

The Pacific region has long been considered in need of development. Countless projects from around the world have intervened over the decades and yet there’s been very little real change for the people. Could a human-centred design approach finally create the opportunities remote community dwellers desire? In 2015 Fjord and … Read more »

Wrap #03: Code 16

Wrap Code cover
Most of you will know by now that we have been producing Scroll magazine to accompany our conferences, but not everyone might know we also produce a post-conference magazine called Wrap.

The idea of Wrap is to … Read more »

Monday Profile: Alicia Sedlock

Alicia SedlockAt our Code 16 conference, Alicia Sedlock gave a very popular presentation on testing – not, you might think, the most rivetting subject but one made practical and accessible by Alicia.

It probably didn’t hurt that Alicia featured a … Read more »

Video of the Week – Maciej Cegłowski: the Website Obesity Crisis

Performance was a big theme for our Web Directions conference in 2015, so it was appropriate that the closing keynote to our last conference in that format was delivered by Maciej Cegłowski, addressing the way our websites have grown in size to the point where performance and the user experience … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Katie McLaughlin – The Power ⚡️ and Responsibility 😓 of Unicode Adoption

Communication is difficult. Whether it’s between humans or machines or a combination of the two, trying to translate meaningful information is a lossy process.

Converting programming languages to use the new Unicode standard is hard, but once it’s in place, you get this marvellous feature-add: Emoji compatibility. No longer do we … Read more »

Countdown to Direction 16

10th anniversaryWe’re counting down to Direction, our big end of year conference, the 10th anniversary of our very first event. For this year we’ve made some changes (while keeping to the essence of the event thousands of attendees over the … Read more »

Monday Profile: Greg Rewis

Greg RewisOur series of interviews with conference speakers for Scroll Magazine has proven very popular, both for the insights each has given into that particular speaker but also how they compare to each other. This week, we profile Greg Rewis, speaker … Read more »

Video of the Week: Josh Clark–buttons are a hack

At Direction 16, coming up in he middle of November, we’re really fortunate to have a number of our most popular speakers from the last decade returning to help us set a course for the next.

So in the coming weeks we’ll be reprising some of the most engaging … Read more »

Video: In conversation with Tim Kadlec

cropped-for-blogpost

It’s great to be back with a new round of “A Dao of the Web” interviews. If you missed some of the earlier ones, I recently chatted with several of the speakers from our Respond conference, including Ethan Marcotte, Karen McGrane, Sara Soueidan, … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Cameron Adams–Onboarding at Canva, from Zero to Four Ten Million

With digital products, the saying “you never get a second chance at a first impression” is a cold hard fact. There are many hurdles that prevent a potential user from becoming a passionate user and the way that you onboard them to your product can make or break it.
Cameron Adams, … Read more »