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So, how can we play with data to offer genuinely new perspectives on the things we’re doing? And what stories are emerging as we do that?

Like what you see? Want a piece of the action next time around? Then get along to Web Directions South in Sydney October 24 and 25 2013.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Session description

HTML5 Video has been a hot topic for the last couple of years — but with new additions to the specification, we can now extend it beyond all recognition. In this session we’ll look at basic timed data, closed captioning and more — and as we adventure into more sophisticated uses of the technology, we’ll explore what additional value timed data can provide to your video, with attention paid to how you can implement it today. The key focuses of this session will be accessibility, searchable media, and enriching existing multimedia experiences with timed data, all with a liberal application of flashy eye-candy. And of course we’re using the freshly minted Timed Text Track specification, soon appearing in a browser near you!

About Christopher Giffard

Photo of Christopher GiffardChristopher Giffard is a full stack web developer at the Department of Education, Employment, and Workplace Relations in Canberra. He’s somewhat new to the government, having a career background as a web guy in graphic design and advertising agencies — but hopes to bring a slice of that mad, informal world to the Australian public service. He gets a kick out of solving problems everybody else avoids, has a soft spot for architecture and design, is particularly interested in electronic music, and the algorithmic generation thereof. His current secret project involves natural language processing… and sarcasm detection. Follow Christopher on Twitter: @cgiffard" ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Christopher Giffard - HTML5 Video, Captioning, and Timed Metadata" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(470) "

Photo of Christopher GiffardThe key focuses of this session will be accessibility, searchable media, and enriching existing multimedia experiences with timed data, all with a liberal application of flashy eye-candy. And of course we’re using the freshly minted Timed Text Track specification, soon appearing in a browser near you!

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

The key idea of the Semantic Web is to make information on the Web easily consumable by machines. As machines start to understand web pages as sources of data that can be easily combined with other public data on the Web, the promise is that search on the Web will move well beyond the current paradigm of retrieving pages by keywords. Instead, search engines will start to answer complex queries based on the cumulative knowledge of the Web. In this presentation, we overview the basic set of technologies that can be used to annotate web pages so that they can be processed by data-aware search engines. In particular, we discuss the RDFa and microdata standards of the W3C designed for marking up data in HTML pages. We look at the ways in which this information is currently used by search engines, including the latest schema.org collaboration between Bing, Google, and Yahoo!, which provides a basic set of vocabulary items understood by all three major search engines on the Web.

About Peter Mika

Photo of Peter MikaPeter Mika is a researcher and data architect at Yahoo! Research in Barcelona, working on the applications of semantic technology to Web search. He received his BS in computer science from Eotvos Lorand University and his MSc and PhD in computer science (summa cum laude) from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. His interdisciplinary work in social networks and the Semantic Web earned him a Best Paper Award at the 2005 International Semantic Web Conference and a First Prize at the 2004 Semantic Web Challenge. From 2006 to 2009, he has been a co-chair of the Semantic Web Challenge. Mika is the youngest member elected to the editorial board of the Journal of Web Semantics. He is the author of the book ‘Social Networks and the Semantic Web’ (Springer, 2007). In 2008 he has been selected as one of “AI’s Ten to Watch” by the editorial board of the IEEE Intelligent Systems journal. Peter is a regular speaker at conferences. Follow Peter on Twitter: @pmika" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Peter Mika - Making the Web searchable" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(315) "

Photo of Peter MikaIn this presentation, we overview the basic set of technologies that can be used to annotate web pages so that they can be processed by data-aware search engines.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

The Australian War Memorial is connecting and enriching online archives and collections toward building a platform for telling history. Through Drupal 7 and Linked Data, the Memorial intends to develop tools that designers, researchers and historians can use to help find new ways of building historical narratives. During this session we will demonstrate some early prototypes and experiments, key uses of Linked Data, practical publishing tools and discuss how this work is unfolding inside one of Australia’s major collecting institutions.

About Adam Bell

Photo of Adam BellAdam Bell leads the web production team at the Australian War Memorial, where he works with curators and historians to publish the Memorial’s vast archives and collections online. He has a background as an artist, cultural worker, teacher and printmaker and plays in a rock n roll band. Follow Adam on Twitter: @bumphead

About David Peterson

Photo of David PetersonDavid Peterson has been pushing at the boundaries of Web development since 1995; that combined with a background in wildlife cinematography brings fresh insight into what can be a geeky sort of space. He has built a number of high profile sites for the ABC, Australian science groups and many others. David works as a consultant with PreviousNext and lives way down south in cool Tasmania — regularly breathing on his fingers just to tap away at the keyboard. He is busy building Web apps built with Open Source toolkits utilising Java, PHP, Python, Linked Data and the almighty Drupal. He enjoys exploring deep into the guts of the Semantic Web and Linked Data to discover new connections and visualisations that help empower story tellers. Follow David on Twitter: @davidseth" ["post_title"]=> string(107) "Adam Bell & David Peterson - Bringing History Alive: Telling stories with Linked Data and open source tools" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(535) "

Photo of Adam BellPhoto of David PetersonDuring this session we will demonstrate some early prototypes and experiments, key uses of Linked Data, practical publishing tools and discuss how this work is unfolding inside one of Australia’s major collecting institutions.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

In 2020 there will be nearly 10 times as many Internet connected devices as there are human beings on this planet. The majority of these will not have web browsers. When it comes to the “Internet of Things”, web designers and developers are uniquely placed to create, connect and produce innovative new ways for these devices to be used. We are used to mashing up disconnected data sets, playing with APIs and designing for constantly moving standards in order to create compelling digital user experiences. “Old school” engineers are struggling to keep pace due to long processes for product and service design but as web creators we understand the value of rapid prototyping, user feedback and quick iterations. As developers, we play daily with a bewildering array of technologies that span networks, servers and user interfaces. As designers, we understand the nature of beautiful but usable technology. These skills, and our innate understanding of how interconnectedness enhances and creates engaging user experiences, mean that web creators will be critical for the next generation of Internet enabled Things in our world. From a potplant that tweets when it needs water to crowd sourcing pollution data with sensors on people’s windows and visualising it on Google Maps these are the new boundaries of the web creator’s skills. Have you ever dreamt of sending your phone to the edge of space to take a picture of a country? Or how about a robot you can control via a web browser? By exploring examples of things in the wild right now and delving into practical guidance for for getting started, this session will demonstrate how easy it is for web designers and developers to build Internet connected and aware Things.

About Andrew Fisher

Photo of Andrew FisherAndrew Fisher is deeply passionate about technology and is constantly tinkering with and breaking something — whether it’s a new application for mobile computing, building a robot, deploying a cloud or just playing around with web tech. Sometimes he does some real work too and has been involved in developing digital solutions for businesses since the dawn of the web in Australia and Europe for brands like Nintendo, peoplesound, Sony, Mitsubishi, Sportsgirl and the Melbourne Cup. Andrew is the CTO for JBA Digital, a data agency in Melbourne Australia, where he focuses on creating meaning out of large, changing data sets for clients. Andrew is also the founder of Rocket Melbourne, a startup technology lab exploring physical computing and the Web of Things. Follow Andrew on Twitter: @ajfisher" ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(334) "

Photo of Andrew FisherWhen it comes to the “Internet of Things”, web designers and developers are uniquely placed to create, connect and produce innovative new ways for these devices to be used.

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Web Directions @media 2011, London, May 26th 1:40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is estimated to produce 15 petabytes of data per year. This is difficult to store let alone understand! With connected devices quickly out numbering connected people, we are soon going to be swamped with data. Visualising the constant stream of information we are collecting so that it can be better understood is going to be a critical task. In this presentation, I’ll walk you through a quick overview of some basic chart and graph design, then look at how easy it is to write some quick scripts in your favourite language to produce beautiful graphics. SVG is an under-​​rated technology, but it can be created programmatically and quickly to visualise data.

About Brian Suda

Photo of Brian SudaBrian Suda is an informatician residing in Reykjavík, Iceland. He has spent a good portion of each day connected to Internet after discovering it back in the mid-1990s. Most recently, he has written a book on the topic of charts and graphs entitled Designing with Data. His own little patch of Internet can be found at suda.co.uk where many past projects and crazy ideas can be found. Follow Brian on Twitter: @briansuda
" ["post_title"]=> string(29) "Brian Suda - Visualising Data" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(477) "

Photo of Brian SudaIn this presentation, I’ll walk you through a quick overview of some basic chart and graph design, then look at how easy it is to write some quick scripts in your favourite language to produce beautiful graphics. SVG is an under-​​rated technology, but it can be created programmatically and quickly to visualise data.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 1:25pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

While location-based mobile apps are becoming increasingly popular, they are still relatively new. Special considerations need to be made for battery life and handling large data sets of geolocated data. The good news is there are many services and technologies you can use to assist you in building mobile location-based apps. In this session, Aaron Parecki, co-founder of Geoloqi.com, shows you services you can leverage to do things like nearby business lookups, location-based triggers, nearest intersection queries, and more. Aaron also covers the location services available on the various mobile platforms as well as in HTML 5, and shares some insights on how to deal with battery life. The session concludes with some real-world use cases for real-time location such as turning on and off your lights in your house or notifying your boss if you’ll be late to work.

About Aaron Parecki

Photo of Aaron PareckiAaron Parecki is a Portland-based iPhone and PHP developer interested in solving practical problems with technology. In his free time, he enjoys geolocation, linguistics, and building home automation systems and IRC bots with a sense of humor. For the past 2½ years, he has been tracking and visualizing his location every 6 seconds. He created Geoloqi.com with Amber Case in an effort to help people connect in the real world. He has 11 years experience in web app development, database design, and server administration. Follow Aaron on Twitter: @aaronpk
" ["post_title"]=> string(27) "Aaron Parecki - Geolocation" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(459) "

Photo of Aaron PareckiWhile location-based mobile apps are becoming increasingly popular, they are still relatively new. Special considerations need to be made for battery life and handling large data sets of geolocated data. The good news is there are many services and technologies you can use to assist you in building mobile location-based apps.

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Web Directions USA 2010, Loews Atlanta Hotel, September 24 3.15pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Many of us create and work with data that lives on the web. This kind of data has similar characteristics that makes it possible to learn successful techniques and avoid ‘reinventing the wheel’ for analysis. In this talk, I’ll give a brief history of the field with a focus on the fundamental math and algorithmic tools that we use to address these kinds of problems, then walk through several descriptive and predictive scenarios. We’ll also discuss the likely future evolution of this type of data and the active research problems that are currently fascinating.

About Hilary Mason

Hilary Mason PortraitHilary is the lead scientist at bit.ly, where she is finding sense in vast data sets. She is a former computer science professor with a background in machine learning and data mining, has published numerous academic papers, and regularly releases code on her personal site, hilarymason.com. She has discovered two new species, loves to bake cookies, and asks way too many questions. Follow Hilary on Twitter: @hmason
" ["post_title"]=> string(61) "Closing keynote: Hilary Mason - Machine Learning for Web Data" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(378) "

Hilary Mason PortraitMany of us create and work with data that lives on the web. This kind of data has similar characteristics that makes it possible to learn successful techniques and avoid ‘reinventing the wheel’ for analysis.

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Web Directions USA 2010, Loews Atlanta Hotel, September 23 2.40pm.

Presentation slides

Presentation slides are available to download (PDF).

Session description

Building compelling consumer experiences is often described as being more art than science. Increasingly, those who build them are under pressure to validate their design decisions with data. What is the appropriate role of quantitative and quantitative data when designing for interaction? What are the most effective ways to gather and interpret data that effectively improves the quality of the consumer experience? Ryan Freitas will tackle these and other issues while discussing the importance of integrating data-based iteration into your heuristics-driven design process.

About Ryan Freitas

Ryan Freitas PortraitRyan Freitas is the founder and principal strategist at Second Verse, an experience design consultancy in San Francisco, California. Second Verse specializes in combining superior interaction design with compelling product strategy for technology startups and global media companies. Ryan enthusiastically pursues the opportunity to work on emerging user experience principles, and he has a strong interest in informatics, empathic design, and democratizing access to technology. He lives in San Francisco with his wife Kristen.

Follow Ryan on Twitter: @ryanchris

" ["post_title"]=> string(54) "Ryan Freitas - Balancing data-driven & "genius" design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(395) "

Ryan Freitas PortraitWhat is the appropriate role of quantitative and quantitative data when designing for interaction? What are the most effective ways to gather and interpret data that effectively improves the quality of the consumer experience?

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 2.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

The USA and UK governments have made significant progress with linked, open data in recent months. Several fundamental datasets from the Australian Government are on the cusp of being exposed as meaningful, reusable, machine-​​readable assets, further driving the adoption of linked data within and around government. Making better use of online data offerings using a combination of top-​​down policy and guidance, together with bottom-​​up development efforts from agency web teams, would seem to describe a sustainable, organic growth in linked government data. Learn about the path to the first release of data​.gov​.au; a draft roadmap to future releases; the barriers to linked data and open public sector information (PSI); and the real-​​world questions this technology aims to solve.

About Gordon Grace

Gordon Grace PortraitBased in the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO), Gordon has been working on whole-​​of-​​government websites and Australian Government web policies since early 2006. Gordon likes making attractive, useful things that matter to people. He’s some thing of a ‘plate spinner’, and likes to punish himself by taking on too many projects at once. Gordon can often be found prodding and lifting dirty great big IT systems over usability, accessibility and standards-​​compliance hurdles, gently preparing them for the hostile, unforgiving and unpredictable web. Gordon lives in Canberra with his wife and two young children, who are rarely hostile, frequently forgiving, and always unpredictable. Follow Gordon on Twitter: @gordongrace
" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Gordon Grace - More than raw: government data online" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(435) "

Gordon Grace PortraitLearn about the path to the first release of data​.gov​.au; a draft roadmap to future releases; the barriers to linked data and open public sector information (PSI); and the real-​​world questions this technology aims to solve.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 14 1.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Libraries contain masses of beautifully structured data collected over many years. But these records may have their flaws and might now want to be used in ways, such as location based services, that weren't imagined 30 years ago. How can we use existing API's and web services to enrich this data to enable it to be used in a variety of ways. This data also needs to be exposed for others to use and build upon. With the recent release of the Government response to the Web 2.0 taskforce, how can institutions comply with these recommendations by providing their data in usable forms for the public. What's involved in building an API into our resources and how can our data be given more meaning through semantic linkages like RDFa?

About Paul Hagon

Paul Hagon PortraitPaul is the Senior Web Designer at the National Library of Australia and has been working on the web in cultural institutions since 1999. His job entails a mix of design, coding, and accessibility. He is a thinker and "ideas" man. He finds cultural institutions fascinating because of what they bring to society, they are rich resources of information and provide vast potential for exploring hidden treasures. Paul enjoys making these items available and telling their stories in ways that may not be the most obvious. He likes to use technology in a relevant way to enrich the way we can interact with these resources. In 2010 Paul was named a "Mover and Shaker" of the library world by Library Journal. Follow Paul on Twitter: @paulhagon
" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Paul Hagon - Enriching large data sets" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(897) "

Paul Hagon PortraitLibraries contain masses of beautifully structured data collected over many years. But these records may have their flaws and might now want to be used in ways, such as location based services, that weren't imagined 30 years ago. How can we use existing API's and web services to enrich this data to enable it to be used in a variety of ways. This data also needs to be exposed for others to use and build upon. With the recent release of the Government response to the Web 2.0 taskforce, how can institutions comply with these recommendations by providing their data in usable forms for the public. What's involved in building an API into our resources and how can our data be given more meaning through semantic linkages like RDFa?

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 14 11.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

RDFa is a W3C standard for embedding semantic metadata directly into HTML web pages. While early work on RDFa dates back to 2004, it recently gathered a lot of uptake and traction through the adoption by big players such as Google, Yahoo! and Facebook. This has put the Semantic Web into the attention of a much wider public, setting RDFa out the be the technology to finally bring the Semantic Web into the mainstream. The language gained the status of a W3C recommendation in late 2009 as RDFa 1.0. Since then, the RDFa working group has been established to improve and extend the standard. Eventually, this work will result in a new version of the language, which is set to be released as RDFa 1.1 in 2011. In this talk, an overview will be given of the RDFa technology in general, followed by an outline of its latest developments, such as the RDFa API, or the definition of RDFa Core, which prepares the standard to extend its scope beyond the context of web pages, by allowing it to be included into any other markup language than just HTML.

About Knud Möller

Knud Möller PortraitKnud Möller is a post-doctoral researcher at DERI at the National University of Ireland in Galway, where he received his PhD on "Lifecycle Support for Data on the Semantic Web". His work focusses on topics such as collaborative technologies, data lifecycles and networked knowledge, on which he has published and continues to publish in a range of papers. Knud is also a consultant on Semantic Web topics for socialbits.net, and has been involved in the organisation of a number of international conferences as the metadata and semantic technologies chair. He has been a member of the W3C RDFa Working Group since March 2010.
" ["post_title"]=> string(30) "Knud Möller - RDFa everywhere" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(347) "

Knud Möller PortraitIn this talk, an overview will be given of the RDFa technology in general, followed by an outline of its latest developments, such as the RDFa API and the definition of RDFa Core.

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Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 9 2.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Far from being the enemy, data can be a designer’s best friend. So much so that it just might be the backbone of the next evolution of web design. Data doesn’t mean less creativity and experimentation, it means more. We’ve learned how to design sites that look good, and we know how to mark up our pages with web standards. Now it’s time to figure out what performs best. In this session you’ll learn not just the fundamental concepts of this ‘new web design’, but how you can get started with data-driven design using free tools that are available right now. If you’ve reached a point where you know how to design and build attractive, standards-based web sites and are wondering what comes next, this is the session for you.

About Luke Stevens

Luke Stevens PortraitLuke Stevens is a freelance, Sydney-based web designer with clients in the US, UK and locally in Australia. He has been secretly nerding it up since school, when he started designing Mac BBS interfaces in the mid 90’s, and websites soon after. With a passion for design, some brief formal print design training and a decade of learning new things about the web, he has built sites of all shapes and sizes for clients all over the world. ExpressionEngine has been his weapon of choice since 2004, but he is now refocusing on exciting, new, data-driven ways of doing design, with a book and new business focused on software marketing sites in the works. He’s pretty sure that testing is the future of web design. Follow Luke on Twitter: @lukestevens

" ["post_title"]=> string(33) "Luke Stevens - Data driven design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(526) "

Luke Stevens PortraitFar from being the enemy, data can be a designer’s best friend. So much so that it just might be the backbone of the next evolution of web design. Data doesn’t mean less creativity and experimentation, it means more. We’ve learned how to design sites that look good, and we know how to mark up our pages with web standards. Now it’s time to figure out what performs best.

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Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 11.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

The ABC launched three new socially networked digital radio websites: ABC Dig Music, ABC Jazz and ABC Country in July 2009. They are the first of several ABC projects involving content aggregation. As well as having slick, highly usable designs the music platform integrates with various sources including MusicBrainz, YouTube, Last.fm and Wikipedia. This aggregation functionality graphically illustrates the possibilities of Semantic Web technology for an editorial organisation such as the ABC. 
Fergus Pitt will discuss why and how the ABC is using the radically transformed online environment to enhance its new digital music radio stations ABC Dig Music, ABC Jazz and ABC Country, and how the functionality and technologies relate to the ABC’s charter, editorial policies and traditional operations. 
David Peterson will explain how the sites were built with Drupal 6 and key ingredients that made the mashup possible: Semantic Web, Linked Data, MusicBrainz, Last.FM, Discogs and Apache Solr Search. He will cover the highs and the lows of Drupal along with the secret sauce that makes it all work.

About Fergus Pitt

Fergus Pitt PortraitFergus Pitt is the Technical and Strategic Projects Manager for ABC Radio Multiplatform. He has worked on the development of the ABC’s digital radio operation, and has been involved in ABC projects around participatory media, locative media, and changed production models for the digital environment. Follow Fergus on Twitter: @fergle

About David Peterson

David Peterson PortraitDavid Peterson has been pushing at the boundaries of Web development since 1995; that combined with a background in wildlife cinematography brings fresh insight into what can be a geeks’ paradise. David works as an independent consultant way up north in the tropics of Townsville where the heat nearly threatens to fry his brain. He is busy building Web apps that utilise Java, .Net, Semantic Web and the almighty Drupal. He enjoys exploring deep into the guts of these amazing platforms and strategically implanting Semantic Web goodies - opening up the possibility to do all sorts of deep Web integration. Did anyone say ‘Linked Data”? Follow David on Twitter: @davidseth

" ["post_title"]=> string(53) "Fergus Pitt & David Peterson - The mashed up playlist" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(901) "

Fergus Pitt PortraitDavid Peterson PortraitThe ABC launched three new socially networked digital radio websites: ABC Dig Music, ABC Jazz and ABC Country in July 2009. They are the first of several ABC projects involving content aggregation. As well as having slick, highly usable designs the music platform integrates with various sources including MusicBrainz, YouTube, Last.fm and Wikipedia. This aggregation functionality graphically illustrates the possibilities of Semantic Web technology for an editorial organisation such as the ABC.

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Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 9 2.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Social Networks have been a world-wide phenomenon and their proliferation poses a pressing interoperability and usability challenge to both web users and service providers. Web users have different social networks accounts and utilise them in different ways depending on the context. For example, more friendly chat on FaceBook, more professional on LinkedIn, and a bit daring interaction on Hi5. Maintaining these multiple online profiles is cumbersome and time consuming and locks in the web user to a service provider. Also, sharing information and user-generated content is particularly challenging due to the obscure nature of privacy and rights management on social networks and the lack of awareness and transparency of such policies. The W3C Social Web Incubator Group (XG) has been investigating these challenges with the purpose to define a number of new standards that can address the needs of the social web users and balance the needs from the servicer providers. This talk will look at the social profile portability needs and the policy (privacy and rights) directions needed to break down the “walled gardens” of social networks.

About Renato Iannella

Renato Iannella PortraitRenato is a Principal Scientist at the National ICT Australia (NICTA) research laboratory where he leads the Social and Professional Interoperable Networks (SPIN) research activity. His research covers technologies and standards in distributed information modeling and architectures, rights management, and policy-oriented web infrastructures. Renato has extensive experience standards for Internet, Web, and Mobile technologies and was a former member of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Advisory Board. Renato also is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Queensland, Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Hong Kong and was previously the Chief Scientist at LiveEvents Wireless, IPR Systems and Principal Research Scientist at the Distributed Systems Technology Centre (DSTC). Follow Renato on Twitter: @riannella

" ["post_title"]=> string(44) "Renato Iannella - Opening up social networks" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(892) "

Renato Iannella PortraitSocial Networks have been a world-wide phenomenon and their proliferation poses a pressing interoperability and usability challenge to both web users and service providers. Web users have different social networks accounts and utilise them in different ways depending on the context. For example, more friendly chat on FaceBook, more professional on LinkedIn, and a bit daring interaction on Hi5. Maintaining these multiple online profiles is cumbersome and time consuming and locks in the web user to a service provider. Also, sharing information and user-generated content is particularly challenging due to the obscure nature of privacy and rights management on social networks and the lack of awareness and transparency of such policies.

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So, how can we play with data to offer genuinely new perspectives on the things we’re doing? And what stories are emerging as we do that?

Like what you see? Want a piece of the action next time around? Then get along to Web Directions South in Sydney October 24 and 25 2013.

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Presentations about data

Podcasts, slides, videos and more

The bit between data and you — video presentation from Matthew Sheret

So, how can we play with data to offer genuinely new perspectives on the things we’re doing? And what stories are emerging as we do that?

Like what you see? Want a piece of the action next time around? Then get along to Web Directions South in Sydney October 24 and 25 2013.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Christopher Giffard — HTML5 Video, Captioning, and Timed Metadata

Photo of Christopher GiffardThe key focuses of this session will be accessibility, searchable media, and enriching existing multimedia experiences with timed data, all with a liberal application of flashy eye-​​candy. And of course we’re using the freshly minted Timed Text Track specification, soon appearing in a browser near you!

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Peter Mika — Making the Web searchable

Photo of Peter MikaIn this presentation, we overview the basic set of technologies that can be used to annotate web pages so that they can be processed by data-​​aware search engines.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Adam Bell & David Peterson — Bringing History Alive: Telling stories with Linked Data and open source tools

Photo of Adam BellPhoto of David PetersonDuring this session we will demonstrate some early prototypes and experiments, key uses of Linked Data, practical publishing tools and discuss how this work is unfolding inside one of Australia’s major collecting institutions.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Andrew Fisher — How the web is going physical

Photo of Andrew FisherWhen it comes to the “Internet of Things”, web designers and developers are uniquely placed to create, connect and produce innovative new ways for these devices to be used.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Brian Suda — Visualising Data

Photo of Brian SudaIn this presentation, I’ll walk you through a quick overview of some basic chart and graph design, then look at how easy it is to write some quick scripts in your favourite language to produce beautiful graphics. SVG is an under-​​​​rated technology, but it can be created programmatically and quickly to visualise data.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Aaron Parecki — Geolocation

Photo of Aaron PareckiWhile location-​​based mobile apps are becoming increasingly popular, they are still relatively new. Special considerations need to be made for battery life and handling large data sets of geolocated data. The good news is there are many services and technologies you can use to assist you in building mobile location-​​based apps.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Closing keynote: Hilary Mason — Machine Learning for Web Data

Hilary Mason PortraitMany of us create and work with data that lives on the web. This kind of data has similar characteristics that makes it possible to learn successful techniques and avoid ‘reinventing the wheel’ for analysis.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Ryan Freitas — Balancing data-​​driven & “genius” design

Ryan Freitas PortraitWhat is the appropriate role of quantitative and quantitative data when designing for interaction? What are the most effective ways to gather and interpret data that effectively improves the quality of the consumer experience?

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Gordon Grace — More than raw: government data online

Gordon Grace PortraitLearn about the path to the first release of data​.gov​.au; a draft roadmap to future releases; the barriers to linked data and open public sector information (PSI); and the real-​​​​world questions this technology aims to solve.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Paul Hagon — Enriching large data sets

Paul Hagon PortraitLibraries contain masses of beautifully structured data collected over many years. But these records may have their flaws and might now want to be used in ways, such as location based services, that weren’t imagined 30 years ago. How can we use existing API’s and web services to enrich this data to enable it to be used in a variety of ways. This data also needs to be exposed for others to use and build upon. With the recent release of the Government response to the Web 2.0 taskforce, how can institutions comply with these recommendations by providing their data in usable forms for the public. What’s involved in building an API into our resources and how can our data be given more meaning through semantic linkages like RDFa?

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Knud Möller — RDFa everywhere

Knud Möller PortraitIn this talk, an overview will be given of the RDFa technology in general, followed by an outline of its latest developments, such as the RDFa API and the definition of RDFa Core.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Luke Stevens — Data driven design

Luke Stevens PortraitFar from being the enemy, data can be a designer’s best friend. So much so that it just might be the backbone of the next evolution of web design. Data doesn’t mean less creativity and experimentation, it means more. We’ve learned how to design sites that look good, and we know how to mark up our pages with web standards. Now it’s time to figure out what performs best.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Fergus Pitt & David Peterson — The mashed up playlist

Fergus Pitt PortraitDavid Peterson PortraitThe ABC launched three new socially networked digital radio websites: ABC Dig Music, ABC Jazz and ABC Country in July 2009. They are the first of several ABC projects involving content aggregation. As well as having slick, highly usable designs the music platform integrates with various sources including MusicBrainz, YouTube, Last​.fm and Wikipedia. This aggregation functionality graphically illustrates the possibilities of Semantic Web technology for an editorial organisation such as the ABC.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Renato Iannella — Opening up social networks

Renato Iannella PortraitSocial Networks have been a world-​​wide phenomenon and their proliferation poses a pressing interoperability and usability challenge to both web users and service providers. Web users have different social networks accounts and utilise them in different ways depending on the context. For example, more friendly chat on FaceBook, more professional on LinkedIn, and a bit daring interaction on Hi5. Maintaining these multiple online profiles is cumbersome and time consuming and locks in the web user to a service provider. Also, sharing information and user-​​generated content is particularly challenging due to the obscure nature of privacy and rights management on social networks and the lack of awareness and transparency of such policies.

See the slides and hear the podcast »