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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Natalie and Simon launched the first version of Lanyrd.com while on honeymoon in Casablanca. As the site took off, they realised their side project was destined to become something much bigger. This talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-week proof of concept to a full-fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

About Natalie Downe

Photo of Natalie DowneNatalie co-founded Lanyrd on her honeymoon with her husband Simon. Before co-founding a startup, she worked as a senior client-side engineer at Clearleft in Brighton, UK. Today, she juggles leading design, client-side engineering and UX on the project with building the company. If Natalie had any time for hobbies, she would enjoy pottery, yoga, writing and flying her kite. Follow Natalie on Twitter: @Natbat

About Simon Willison

Photo of Simon WillisonSimon is a co-founder of Lanyrd, and co-creator of the Django web framework. Prior to diving in to the world of entrepreneurship, Simon built crowdsourcing and database journalism projects for the Guardian newspaper in London. Simon is responsible for all of the server-side code on Lanyrd, unsurprisingly written with Django. He is also obsessed with Zeppelins, and hopes one day to build one. Follow Simon on Twitter: @simonw" ["post_title"]=> string(69) "Natalie Downe & Simon Willison - Lanyrd: From side project to startup" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(620) "

Photo of Natalie DownePhoto of Simon WillisonThis talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-week proof of concept to a full-fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Would you like to learn how to organize your JavaScript applications so they can scale? Be able to write apps that support switching out Dojo or jQuery without rewriting a line of code? Application architecture is one of those aspects to development where minor problems can lead to major issues later on if it isn’t done right. Developers writing client-side apps these days usually use a combination of MVC, modules, widgets, plugins and frameworks for theirs. Whilst this works great for apps that are built at a smaller-scale, what happens when your project really starts to grow?. In this talk, I’ll be presenting an effective set of design patterns for large-scale JavaScript application architecture that have previously been used at both AOL and Yahoo amongst others to develop scalable applications. You’ll learn how to keep your application logic truly decoupled, build modules that can exist on their own independently so they can be easily dropped into other projects and future-proof your code in case you need to switch to a different DOM library in the future.

About Addy Osmani

Photo of Addy OsmaniAddy Osmani is a popular JavaScript blogger and a UI Developer for AOL based in London, England. He is also a member of the jQuery [Bug Triage/Docs/Front-end] teams where he assists with bugs, documentation and community updates. His free book, ‘Essential JavaScript Design Patterns’ has been downloaded over 200,000 times in the past year and continues to be expanded in his spare time. For more on Addy’s work, check out his blog AddyOsmani.com for tutorials, his G+ page for his community updates and magazines such as .net for his thoughts and commentaries. Follow Addy on Twitter: @addy_osmani" ["post_title"]=> string(49) "Addy Osmani - Scalable JavaScript Design Patterns" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(341) "

Photo of Addy OsmaniWould you like to learn how to organize your JavaScript applications so they can scale? Be able to write apps that support switching out Dojo or jQuery without rewriting a line of code?

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Web Directions @media 2011, London, May 27th 10:45am.

Session description

The work we’re collectively doing—opening up gradually all of human information and media, making it recombinable, helping people create and share their work—is a huge unspoken, sexy, world-​​redefining mission. It’s a mission that many of us have become blasé about, almost unaware of. It’s a project so large that it’s hard to get a grasp on. And the next few years are going to get even more interesting as the network pervades physical objects and environments, sensing and manifesting information in the real world. It’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

About Tom Coates

Photo of Tom CoatesTom Coates is a technologist and writer who focuses on new product development, the web of data, location services and social software . He’s worked for many of the web’s leading companies, including Time Out, the BBC—where he ran a small R&D team focused on future media—and Yahoo! where he was Head of Product for the Brickhouse incubator and developed the Fire Eagle location sharing service. Now independent, he lives in San Francisco and works as a freelance product designer and consultant. Follow Tom on Twitter: @tomcoates
" ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Tom Coates - Opening keynote: A New Network" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(398) "

Photo of Tom CoatesIt’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 9:10am.

Presentation slides

Session description

This keynote will focus on the unique potential offered to web developers — the ability to use the web platform to build compelling applications that reach across different devices, scenarios and environments. In discussing the approaches necessary to deliver great experiences across all these spaces, we will also uncover unique opportunities in a platform that reaches from mobile phones to the biggest display screen in your house.

About Chris WIlson

Photo of Chris WilsonChris Wilson is a Developer Advocate at Google Inc. He began working on web browsers in 1993 when he co-authored the original Windows version of NCSA Mosaic, the first mass-market WWW browser. After leaving NCSA in 1994 and spending a year working on the AIRMosaic web browser for SPRY, Inc., he joined Microsoft’s Internet Explorer team as a developer in 1995. Over the course of 15 years, Chris represented Microsoft in many standards working groups, in particular helping develop standards for Cascading Style Sheets, HTML, the Document Object Model and XSL through the W3C working groups. He also developed the first implementation of Cascading Style Sheets in Internet Explorer – the first, in fact, in any mass-market web browser. Beginning in 2001, he spent a few years working on the WPF project, but rejoined the IE team in 2004 to lead the IE Platform and Security team, then moved to work on the Javascript engine team in 2009. In 2010, Chris left Microsoft and joined Google’s Developer Relations team, and is currently working on the Google TV project. In his free time, he enjoys photography and hiking with his wife and daughter, and scuba diving in the cool waters of Puget Sound. Occasionally he remembers to share his thoughts on his blog. Follow Chris on Twitter: @cwilso
" ["post_title"]=> string(53) "Chris Wilson - Keynote: The Convergence of All Things" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(594) "

Photo of Chris WilsonThis keynote will focus on the unique potential offered to web developers — the ability to use the web platform to build compelling applications that reach across different devices, scenarios and environments. In discussing the approaches necessary to deliver great experiences across all these spaces, we will also uncover unique opportunities in a platform that reaches from mobile phones to the biggest display screen in your house.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 10:30am.

Presentation slides

External slides (PDF)

Session description

In the absence of a "Widgets for Dummies" book being available at your local bookstore, this presentation will try to bring you up-to-speed with what you need to know to start developing widgets. Split into two parts, we'll cover the theory behind widgets:
  • seriously, yet another platform to code for?! - vendor and manufacturer support for widgets & compatible development frameworks
  • what widgets are good for - save your users (and yourself) time, money and frustration
  • what widgets are not-so-good for - they're not a silver bullet!
and widgets in practice:
  • widgets and device compatibility - the good news is also potential bad news
  • screen sizes - resizing and its headaches
  • widget distribution and making money - everybody else is doing it, so why can't we?
You'll get most out of this talk if you:
  • have heard of widgets but don't know how to use them
  • are wondering whether widgets could solve a particular problem you have. (i.e. no specific browser)
  • have tried making widgets but got stuck and gave up

About Daniel Davis

Photo of Daniel DavisDaniel is the Web Evangelist for Opera’s Japan office based in Tokyo. His previous work experience includes project management, IT training, web development, software development and system administration in both Japan and the UK, his home country. After studying Japanese and Chinese at university, he grew more and more interested in the flourishing field of IT and the web, learning as much as he could by playing and experimenting with internet-related technologies. His current work promoting web standards and cross-device web development at Opera fits in perfectly with his ideology of openness and equality across linguistic, social and socio-economic borders. Follow Daniel on Twitter: @ourmaninjapan
" ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Daniel Davis - Widgets in Theory and Practice" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(351) "

Photo of Daniel DavisIn the absence of a "Widgets for Dummies" book being available at your local bookstore, this presentation will try to bring you up-to-speed with what you need to know to start developing widgets.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 3:50pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

No one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. Argue about programming languages, memory management and reach all you want. There is one undeniable disadvantage that the mobile web faces that native apps don’t–over a decade of legacy code, cruft and entrenched organizational politics. But the web is essential. Even companies whose businesses are centered on native apps need web pages to sell those apps. We can demonstrate time and again that a web-based approach is a smart investment. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences? And most importantly, how should we be changing our web infrastructure, tools and workflow for the coming zombie apocalypse of devices.

About Jason Grigsby

Jason Grigsby PortraitJason Grigsby was one of the project leads on the Obama ’08 iPhone Application and helped design the user interface for the Wall Street Journal’s Blackberry application. Jason is a co-founder of Cloud Four, a small start-up focused on mobile web development. He founded and organizes Mobile Portland. Jason is currently co-authoring Head First Mobile Web for O’Reilly Publishing. The book will be available this winter. Follow Jason on Twitter: @grigs
" ["post_title"]=> string(69) "Jason Grigsby - Keynote: Native is Easy. Mobile Web is Freaking Hard!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(490) "

Jason Grigsby PortraitNo one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences?

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 10.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

Web standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don't always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we'll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before. We'll explore techniques for deciding what client technologies to use on your projects, how to drive the adoption of newer techniques and how not to leave your audience behind. We'll even talk about how to make all of this possible with Internet Explorer in the room.

About Tatham Oddie

Tatham Oddie PortraitTatham Oddie is a technical strategist and roaming consultant. For the third year in a row he is a recipient of the Microsoft-issued "Most Valuable Professional" award, and a regular presenter and participant at conferences and industry groups throughout Australia, New Zealand and North America. His business experience includes the launch of a successful creative agency, a fashion retail and PR business, and is now focussed on the development of Tixi - a niche ticketing agency. Follow Tatham on Twitter: @tathamoddie
" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Tatham Oddie - Practicing Web Standards in the Large" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(568) "

Tatham Oddie PortraitWeb standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don't always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we'll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 14 4.15pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Today's web is being defined more than ever by buzzwords, catchphrases, fads and trends. Startups are being created for startups sake, standards are being hijacked by so-called "social media gurus," and investors are piling on one after another looking to hop on the next big wave. And we, the designers, developers and innovators actually building the web, are left to wonder if we're still in the drivers seat. During this brisk discussion we'll separate fads from the future, debate native apps versus the mobile web, take an honest look at the hype behind geo-location, then take a step back to ask ourselves where the web—and we ourselves—are going. Hold on, it's going to be a wild ride!

About Josh Williams

Josh Williams PortraitJosh Williams is CEO and co-founder of Gowalla, a mobile and Web service that gives people around the world a new way to communicate and express themselves through the everyday places and extraordinary settings they enjoy. Gowalla empowers everyone to capture and share their journey as they go while following the happenings of family and friends. Josh is responsible for building and growing the business while leading the product design team. Gowalla was launched in 2009 and is backed by notable investors including Greylock Partners, Alsop-Louie Partners, Founders Fund, and other prominent angel investors. Josh is a self-taught designer and artist who has been creating online for over 15 years. Josh loves mid-century modern design, architecture, skiing, snowboarding and longboarding. He lives in Austin, Texas with his wife and two young daughters. Follow Josh on Twitter: @JW
" ["post_title"]=> string(44) "Josh Williams - Keynote: Where are we going?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(455) "

Josh Williams PortraitDuring this brisk discussion we'll separate fads from the future, debate native apps versus the mobile web, take an honest look at the hype behind geo-location, then take a step back to ask ourselves where the web—and we ourselves—are going. Hold on, it's going to be a wild ride!

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 1.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

People are redefining the relationship they have with the organisations they interact with, empowered by social technologies. They are seeking:
  • Human-ness: as organisations have grown in size and become more and more depersonalised, people are wanting more human interactions and personal response
  • Trust: from greenwashing to the GFC, the market's trust has been eroded — people are looking for organisations to say what they mean and mean what they say
  • Co-creation: people are taking a more active role in developing the products and services that they use. And if they don't find what they're looking for, they will often create it themselves
  • Responsibility: people want to engage with organisations that are genuinely addressing the complex issues of sustainability and wellbeing
Building a brand, service or product offering that resonates in this new "economy of meaning" requires a rethinking of an organisation's relationship to the "market" — their customers, stakeholders and the environment. In this presentation Grant Young will examine how innovative organisations are using social technologies and design methods to create multi-dimensional value — both for the organisational and community — and will explore the themes that underpin the examples with a view to applying them in your context.

About Grant Young

Grant Young PortraitGrant is founder of social innovation consultancy Zumio. In this role he combines his 15+ years' experience in online and social technology with his passion for sustainability to help organisations harness these increasingly prominent market forces. Zumio helps its clients — spanning the commercial, government and non-profit sectors — build platforms for social engagement that simultaneously deliver organisational value while increasing societal wellbeing and sustainability. Zumio has recently undertaken projects for the Cancer Institute NSW, the Inspire Foundation, VicRoads and Saasu. Prior to founding Zumio, Grant produced projects for award-winning sustainable design agency Digital Eskimo and managed online communications and social media strategy for conservation organisation WWF-Australia, including for the inaugural Earth Hour (2007). He has also developed web applications for the business sector in the areas of financial and carbon accounting (Saasu, Climate Friendly). Follow Grant on Twitter: @grantyoung
" ["post_title"]=> string(54) "Grant Young - Creating platforms for social innovation" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(474) "

Grant Young PortraitIn this presentation Grant Young will examine how innovative organisations are using social technologies and design methods to create multi-dimensional value — both for the organisational and community — and will explore the themes that underpin the examples with a view to applying them in your context.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 1.4pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

The internet has been around long enough now that it has a proper history, and it has started to produce media and artefacts that live in and comment on that history. James will be talking about his work with writing, books and wikipedia that hopes to explain and illuminate this temporal depth.

About James Bridle

James Bridle PortraitJames Bridle is a publisher, writer and artist based in London, UK. He founded the print-on-demand classics press Bookkake and the e-book-only imprint Artists’ eBooks, and created Bkkeepr, a tool for tracking reading and sharing bookmarks, and Quietube, an accidental anti-censorship proxy for the Middle East. He makes things with words, books and the internet, and writes about what he does at booktwo.org. Follow James on Twitter: @stml
" ["post_title"]=> string(62) "James Bridle - Wrangling Time: The Form and Future of the Book" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(463) "

James Bridle PortraitThe internet has been around long enough now that it has a proper history, and it has started to produce media and artefacts that live in and comment on that history. James will be talking about his work with writing, books and wikipedia that hopes to explain and illuminate this temporal depth.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 14 10.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

We need to decouple the idea of 'book' from the mental image we carry around of 'book.' The innovation and benefit that digital brings to books and publishing lies less in how digital affects final artifacts, and more in how digital affects the systems leading up to and extending beyond those artifacts.

About Craig Mod

Craig Mod PortraitCraig Mod is a writer, designer, publisher and developer concerned with the future of publishing & storytelling. In 2010 he founded publishing think tank PRE/POST. He is co-author, designer and publisher of Art Space Tokyo. He is also co-founding editor and engineer behind TPUTH.com, co-founder and developer of the storytelling project Hitotoki, and frequent collaborator with Information Architects, Japan. He's lived in Tokyo for almost a decade and speaks frequently on the future of books and media. He is the worst speller you will ever meet. Follow Craig on Twitter: @craigmod
" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Craig Mod - How digital affects books and publishing" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(465) "

Craig Mod PortraitWe need to decouple the idea of 'book' from the mental image we carry around of 'book.' The innovation and benefit that digital brings to books and publishing lies less in how digital affects final artifacts, and more in how digital affects the systems leading up to and extending beyond those artifacts.

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Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 9 10.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

The most interesting problems on the web are social, not technical. Once the open, social stack moves into wide use, the real work is going to be on us to create ongoing experiences that inspire, inform, evolve. Avoid this talk if you want to hear about monetizing community, gaming the newest social site for a quick spike in your user numbers, or how to get a [insert cutting edge social platform] strategy for your brand. Instead, we’ll diagram (sentence-like) real examples of marketing and revising (reviving?) web products for connected consumers. Think of it as Mind Hacks for Web Marketers. We’ll show you how sites like Dogster, Etsy, Moo, Photojojo and others parlay initial passions into deep, sustained, active communities. People-powered thinking extends well beyond messaging. Instead, we’ll preach a connected style of marketing that addresses a range of operational areas, both coming & going. We’ll pay particular attention to what happens after launch, as we think an attentive to and fro is the intimate secret of success.

About Deborah Schultz

Deborah Schultz PortraitDeborah Schultz is a thought leader and innovator on the impact and adoption of Internet technologies and the power of technology to connect society, culture and business. She speaks and consults on the cultural and economic impact of the Internet, and specifically where our social and technological networks overlap. She currently serves as Procter & Gamble’s Strategic Adviser for Social Media & Emerging Technology and has also consulted with and advised Fortune 50 companies including Pepsi, GE, and Citicorp as well as numerous internet startups and VC firms. She is a regular keynote speaker at tech and business conferences. Previously, Deborah was the Marketing Director at Six Apart, ran her own marketing consultancy firm, was a management consultant at AnswerThink and spent five years at Citibank where she developed many of the global bank’s first internet initiatives. One of her proudest accomplishments was launching the Downtown Info Center, a lower Manhattan community center & online hub to revitalize lower Manhattan after the attacks of September 11th. Deborah is a graduate of Barnard College, Columbia University. The former Manhattanite is now a tireless road warrior and can be found in SF, NYC, or Tel Aviv. But wherever she is, she’s always ‘connected’. Follow Deborah on Twitter: @debs

" ["post_title"]=> string(41) "Deborah Schultz - It's the people, stupid" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(574) "

Deborah Schultz PortraitThe most interesting problems on the web are social, not technical. Once the open, social stack moves into wide use, the real work is going to be on us to create ongoing experiences that inspire, inform, evolve. Avoid this talk if you want to hear about monetizing community, gaming the newest social site for a quick spike in your user numbers, or how to get a [insert cutting edge social platform] strategy for your brand.

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Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 9.10am.

Session description

Lynne will set the tone of the conference this year with insights into the future of media drawn from her wealth of experience in business, media and online communities as Senior Editor at Fast Company.

About Lynne d Johnson

Lynne D Johnson PortraitLynne d Johnson is the Senior Editor/Community Director for FastCompany.com, a leading website and community for people passionate about business ideas that also offers the complete content of Fast Company magazine. She also writes Digital Media Diva, a technology blog following web, media, and consumer trends for FastCompany.com, and has recently served as a guest blogger or columnist for TheDailyVoice, techPresident, Black Web 2.0, Rushmore Drive, IAC’s online community for African Americans.

Lynne also serves on the Board of Directors of the Literary Freedom Project, a nonprofit arts organization, which seeks to empower communities of color through literature, creative thinking, and new media. Prior to joining Fast Company, she was the General Manager, New Media for VIBE, SPIN, and VIBE Vixen where she she managed marketing, editorial, production, business development, and sales operations for the magazines’ websites and mobile properties. Her personal blog, Lynne d Johnson || music, media, my life, which launched in July 2001, is the recipient of the 2006 Black Weblog Awards Black Blogger Achievement Award.

" ["post_title"]=> string(59) "Lynne d Johnson - Opening keynote: New media - new business" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(427) "

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 9.10am

Lynne D Johnson PortraitLynne will set the tone of the conference this year with insights into the future of media drawn from her wealth of experience in business, media and online communities as Senior Editor at Fast Company.

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Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 26 1.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

So, you’ve decided to tap into a whole new world of business oppportunities by stepping outside the anglocentric world. That’s great! But the process of internationalisaton can be a genuine minefield for the unitiated, so take a few tips from someone who’s been there before. In this talk Myles will cover what internationalization is, when to do it, and how to implement it. Topics include: localization, organising your content for translation, finding and managing translators, and dealing with the unexpected technical issues that inevitably arise.

About Myles Byrne

Portrait of Myles ByrneMyles is the founder of Duck New Media, a Sydney web development and consulting firm.

" ["post_title"]=> string(94) "Myles Byrne - Internationalization - a guide to dealing with the web's favorite 20-letter word" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(788) "

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 26 1.40pm.

Myles Byrne PortraitSo, you’ve decided to tap into a whole new world of business oppportunities by stepping outside the anglocentric world. That’s great! But the process of internationalisaton can be a genuine minefield for the unitiated, so take a few tips from someone who’s been there before. In this talk Myles will cover what internationalization is, when to do it, and how to implement it. Topics include: localization, organising your content for translation, finding and managing translators, and dealing with the unexpected technical issues that inevitably arise.

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Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 26 10.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

It’s not true that there are no proven monetisation models for online communities; in fact, there are distinct revenue streams that have been successful over many years. This session looks at the soft returns on investment for engaging with user generated content, communication and collaboration with the consumer and then moves into how social networks earn money for their investors and developers.

The aim of this session is to limit the slapping of banner ads on every niche community online - you might be surprised to learn that the least profitable revenue model is… Advertising! Come, spend an hour on the Dark Side, and find out which social networks are making money, how much and by what means and learn about the business models in this growth industry.

About Laurel Papworth

Portrait of Laurel PapworthLaurel teaches social media and marketing and public relations courses at Universities and Colleges here in Australia and overseas (Saudi Arabia). She also runs workshops with major media companies such as publishing houses, television and music companies on their social network strategies. Laurel consults with companies ranging from global electronics companies to dating communities to Australian Government departments on all things communication, collaboration and community.

" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Laurel Papworth - The business of being social" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(1012) "

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 26 10.45am.

Laurel Paprworth PortraitIt’s not true that there are no proven monetisation models for online communities; in fact, there are distinct revenue streams that have been successful over many years. This session looks at the soft returns on investment for engaging with user generated content, communication and collaboration with the consumer and then moves into how social networks earn money for their investors and developers.
The aim of this session is to limit the slapping of banner ads on every niche community online - you might be surprised to learn that the least profitable revenue model is… Advertising! Come, spend an hour on the Dark Side, and find out which social networks are making money, how much and by what means and learn about the business models in this growth industry.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Natalie and Simon launched the first version of Lanyrd.com while on honeymoon in Casablanca. As the site took off, they realised their side project was destined to become something much bigger. This talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-week proof of concept to a full-fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

About Natalie Downe

Photo of Natalie DowneNatalie co-founded Lanyrd on her honeymoon with her husband Simon. Before co-founding a startup, she worked as a senior client-side engineer at Clearleft in Brighton, UK. Today, she juggles leading design, client-side engineering and UX on the project with building the company. If Natalie had any time for hobbies, she would enjoy pottery, yoga, writing and flying her kite. Follow Natalie on Twitter: @Natbat

About Simon Willison

Photo of Simon WillisonSimon is a co-founder of Lanyrd, and co-creator of the Django web framework. Prior to diving in to the world of entrepreneurship, Simon built crowdsourcing and database journalism projects for the Guardian newspaper in London. Simon is responsible for all of the server-side code on Lanyrd, unsurprisingly written with Django. He is also obsessed with Zeppelins, and hopes one day to build one. Follow Simon on Twitter: @simonw" ["post_title"]=> string(69) "Natalie Downe & Simon Willison - Lanyrd: From side project to startup" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(620) "

Photo of Natalie DownePhoto of Simon WillisonThis talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-week proof of concept to a full-fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

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Presentations about strategy

Podcasts, slides, videos and more

Natalie Downe & Simon Willison — Lanyrd: From side project to startup

Photo of Natalie DownePhoto of Simon WillisonThis talk will tell the story of Lanyrd, from a two-​​week proof of concept to a full-​​fledged startup via three intensive months of Y Combinator in Silicon Valley. They’ll share the trials, tribulations and lessons they learned along the way. This is the talk they wish they’d heard before they got started!

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Addy Osmani — Scalable JavaScript Design Patterns

Photo of Addy OsmaniWould you like to learn how to organize your JavaScript applications so they can scale? Be able to write apps that support switching out Dojo or jQuery without rewriting a line of code?

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Tom Coates — Opening keynote: A New Network

Photo of Tom CoatesIt’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Chris Wilson — Keynote: The Convergence of All Things

Photo of Chris WilsonThis keynote will focus on the unique potential offered to web developers — the ability to use the web platform to build compelling applications that reach across different devices, scenarios and environments. In discussing the approaches necessary to deliver great experiences across all these spaces, we will also uncover unique opportunities in a platform that reaches from mobile phones to the biggest display screen in your house.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Daniel Davis — Widgets in Theory and Practice

Photo of Daniel DavisIn the absence of a “Widgets for Dummies” book being available at your local bookstore, this presentation will try to bring you up-​​to-​​speed with what you need to know to start developing widgets.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Jason Grigsby — Keynote: Native is Easy. Mobile Web is Freaking Hard!

Jason Grigsby PortraitNo one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences?

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Tatham Oddie — Practicing Web Standards in the Large

Tatham Oddie PortraitWeb standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don’t always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we’ll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Josh Williams — Keynote: Where are we going?

Josh Williams PortraitDuring this brisk discussion we’ll separate fads from the future, debate native apps versus the mobile web, take an honest look at the hype behind geo-​​location, then take a step back to ask ourselves where the web—and we ourselves—are going. Hold on, it’s going to be a wild ride!

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Grant Young — Creating platforms for social innovation

Grant Young PortraitIn this presentation Grant Young will examine how innovative organisations are using social technologies and design methods to create multi-​​dimensional value — both for the organisational and community — and will explore the themes that underpin the examples with a view to applying them in your context.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

James Bridle — Wrangling Time: The Form and Future of the Book

James Bridle PortraitThe internet has been around long enough now that it has a proper history, and it has started to produce media and artefacts that live in and comment on that history. James will be talking about his work with writing, books and wikipedia that hopes to explain and illuminate this temporal depth.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Craig Mod — How digital affects books and publishing

Craig Mod PortraitWe need to decouple the idea of ‘book’ from the mental image we carry around of ‘book.’ The innovation and benefit that digital brings to books and publishing lies less in how digital affects final artifacts, and more in how digital affects the systems leading up to and extending beyond those artifacts.

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Deborah Schultz — It’s the people, stupid

Deborah Schultz PortraitThe most interesting problems on the web are social, not technical. Once the open, social stack moves into wide use, the real work is going to be on us to create ongoing experiences that inspire, inform, evolve. Avoid this talk if you want to hear about monetizing community, gaming the newest social site for a quick spike in your user numbers, or how to get a [insert cutting edge social platform] strategy for your brand.

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Lynne d Johnson — Opening keynote: New media — new business

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 25 9.10am

Lynne D Johnson PortraitLynne will set the tone of the conference this year with insights into the future of media drawn from her wealth of experience in business, media and online communities as Senior Editor at Fast Company.

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Myles Byrne — Internationalization — a guide to dealing with the web’s favorite 20-​​letter word

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 26 1.40pm.

Myles Byrne PortraitSo, you’ve decided to tap into a whole new world of business oppportunities by stepping outside the anglocentric world. That’s great! But the process of internationalisaton can be a genuine minefield for the unitiated, so take a few tips from someone who’s been there before. In this talk Myles will cover what internationalization is, when to do it, and how to implement it. Topics include: localization, organising your content for translation, finding and managing translators, and dealing with the unexpected technical issues that inevitably arise.

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Laurel Papworth — The business of being social

Web Directions South 2008, Sydney Convention Centre, September 26 10.45am.

Laurel Paprworth PortraitIt’s not true that there are no proven monetisation models for online communities; in fact, there are distinct revenue streams that have been successful over many years. This session looks at the soft returns on investment for engaging with user generated content, communication and collaboration with the consumer and then moves into how social networks earn money for their investors and developers.
The aim of this session is to limit the slapping of banner ads on every niche community online — you might be surprised to learn that the least profitable revenue model is… Advertising! Come, spend an hour on the Dark Side, and find out which social networks are making money, how much and by what means and learn about the business models in this growth industry.

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