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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Computers are increasingly being held in the hand rather than sitting atop lap or desk. We now have to consider how our products will work underneath a finger instead of a mouse cursor. Increasingly, too, those products are being delivered as native applications, capable of fully exploiting device capabilities. That has ramifications not only for the way those projects get built, but also how we structure the businesses that support them. In this session, Michael Honey and Tim Riley answer the question “web or native?” from business, product design and development perspectives. They cover the current state of web technology on modern devices and compare it to what’s available through native development platforms. They’ll look at web, native and hybrid strategies successfully employed by Australian and international businesses, and share their own stories as mobile and web developers. Finally, they’ll offer practical guidance on picking a strategy for web or native development that best suits your needs — as either a developer or a client. Tim and Michael are two of the partners behind Icelab, an Australian design and development studio. They’ve trod both the web and native paths through their client work, such as interactive touchscreens for museum exhibits, online photo galleries and mobile tour guides, and also their own projects, like Decaf Sucks, a coffee review community available on the web (optimised for both desktops and smartphones) and as a native iPhone app.

About Michael Honey

Photo of Michael HoneyMichael founded Icelab after a career as creative director and later, interactive director in an agency environment. He has fifteen years’ experience in design for screen, print, video and exhibition spaces, and has expertise in writing, programming, direction and post-production. He is an experienced coder, with a particular interest in algorithmic animation and datavisualisation. He is also experienced in the development of diagrammatic animations for cultural, engineering, scientific and architectural clients. Michael’s interests include architecture, urbanism, and the environment. Follow Michael on Twitter: @michaelhoney

About Tim Riley

Photo of Tim RileyTim is a partner at Australian design and development studio Icelab, where he builds excellent web and mobile applications using Ruby on Rails, JavaScript, Cocoa, and occasionally out of popsicle sticks. On alternate days he runs Decaf Sucks, an online community for coffee reviews, and RentMonkey, which contains the greatest
on the Internet. Tim is an active participant in the Australian web and iOS communities, as a regular speaker at the Sydney Ruby on Rails meetings, organiser of the Canberra Ruby Crew, and part of the Canberra Cocoaheads chapter. Tim loves coffee and hates gluten. Follow Tim on Twitter: " ["post_title"]=> string(76) "Michael Honey & Tim Riley - Web or native? Smart choices for smartphone apps" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(446) "

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

No longer is being connected limited to the constraints of the traditional desktop environment. Devices, networks and the Web are maturing and evolving at a fast rate. Our expectations about what we want, how we want it and when we want it are more complex. Designing experiences for web for the “desktop” environment is something many of us have been doing for a while. Toss in “mobile”, sprinkle that with some social integration, a native app or two and things suddenly start getting a bit more interesting. How do you approach designing experiences that span multiple platforms and devices, contexts and roles to meet the evolving needs of our audiences?

About Alex Young

Photo of Alex YoungAlex Young is co-founder of MOB, an R&D lab in Sydney. MOB create apps, multi-device platforms, Augmented Reality and Computer Vision solutions for customers as well as their own products that are used around the world. MOB is active in the AR standards community globally and work with businesses to provide them hands-on experience using emerging technologies to get a look ahead at what the impacts to their organisations and customers will be. Prior to MOB, Alex spent 10 years heading up UX, Design and Development teams across Interactive TV, Web and Mobile, primarily in Telco-land. Follow Alex on Twitter: @alexmyoung" ["post_title"]=> string(37) "Alex Young - Multi-device, Multi-role" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(302) "

Photo of Alex YoungHow do you approach designing experiences that span multiple platforms and devices, contexts and roles to meet the evolving needs of our audiences?

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

A new generation of touch devices have proven to be exciting playgrounds for app designers. And with every new product we create, we have the opportunity to offer the most clear and efficient experience for our users. Recent UI trends often lean to realistic, faithful representations of analog controls and features. These designs can offer advantages, but also come with their own set of hazards. In this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings. We’ll talk about things like mental models, innovation and usability as they relate to lifelike UI. Finally, Aaron will share some pragmatic guidelines to keep in mind as you build the next wave of mobile and tablet apps.

About Aaron Weyenberg

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergAaron Weyenberg is the UX Lead at TED in New York. Over the last 13 years Aaron has served in key roles at a range of companies, from small design agencies to fledgling startups to internationally recognized media brands. As an Art Director for ESPN, Aaron guided best practices, developed core UI components and designed pioneering real time game and scoring apps. His work appears in places like Smashing Magazine, Six Revisions and Tripwire Magazine. His offline hobbies involve learning about social psychology and human behavior, photography, reading, and an intrepid quest to find the perfect iPod earphones. Follow Aaron on Twitter: @aweyenberg" ["post_title"]=> string(72) "Aaron Weyenberg - Getting Real: Pros and Pitfalls of Realistic UI Design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(301) "

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergIn this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Let’s start with the assumption that computing and networking are as cheap to incorporate into product designs as plastic and aluminum. Anything can tweet, everything knows about everything. The cloud extends from smart speed bumps to exurban data systems, passing through us in the process. We’re basically there technologically today, and over the next [pick a date range] years, we’ll be there distribution-wise. Here’s the issue: now that we have this power what do we do with it? Yes we can now watch the latest movies on our phones while ignoring the rest of the world (if you believe telco ads) and know more about peripheral acquaintances than you ever wanted. But, really, is that it? Is it Angry Birds all the way down? Of course not. Every technology’s most profound social and cultural changes are invisible at the outset. Cheap information processing and networking technology is a brand new phenomenon, culturally speaking, and quickly changing the world in fundamental ways. Designers align the capabilities of a technology with people’s lives, so it is designers who have the power and responsibility to think about what this means. This talk will discuss where ubiquitous computing is today, some changes we can already see happening, and how we can begin to think about the implications of these technologies for design, for business and for the world at large.

About Mike Kuniavsky

Photo of Mike KuniavskyMike Kuniavsky is a designer, writer, researcher, consultant and entrepreneur focused on people’s relationship to digital technology. He cofounded Adaptive Path, a San Francisco design consulting firm, and ThingM, a ubiquitous computing design studio and micro-manufacturer. He is the author of ‘Observing the User Experience,’ a popular textbook of user research methods, and ‘Smart Things: ubiquitous computing user experience design,’ a guide to the user-centered design of digital products. Follow Mike on Twitter: @mikekuniavsky" ["post_title"]=> string(68) "Mike Kuniavsky - Design [in|for|and] the age of ubiquitous computing" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(393) "

Photo of Mike KuniavskyThis talk will discuss where ubiquitous computing is today, some changes we can already see happening, and how we can begin to think about the implications of these technologies for design, for business and for the world at large.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 14th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Microcopy is the ninja of online content. Fast, furious and deadly, it has the power to make or break your online business, to kill or stay your foes. It’s a sentence, a confirmation, a few words. One word, even. It isn’t big or flashy. It doesn’t leave a calling card. If it does its job your customer may never notice it was there. In this session, Relly will show you how you can bolster sales and reflect your company and client’s values through just a few well-chosen words. Designers? Do you get lumped with the interaction copy? Developers? Do you get left trying to make meaningful error messages? Ecommerce managers? Do you want an easy increase in sales? This session will help. It will be a lot of fun. You should definitely come.

About Relly Annett-Baker

Photo of Relly Annett-BakerRelly Annett-​​Baker lives in a leafy market town with her husband and two small sons. As a result, she eats far too many cakes from Waitrose and can be guaranteed to stand on Lego at least once a day. As well as being content strategist and content writer for Supernice Studio, she is employed as live-​​in domestic staff by two cats. She also writes articles and jabbers on about copy to anyone who will listen, creates scrapbooks, and continues to procrastinate over the draft for her book, a guide to creating web content for designers and developers, to be published in Spring 2011 by Five Simple Steps. She better finish this biography before her editor spots she isn’t writing her book again. Follow Relly on Twitter: @RellyAB" ["post_title"]=> string(41) "Relly Annett-Baker - All The Small Things" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(337) "

Photo of Relly Annett-BakerIn this session, Relly will show you how you can bolster sales and reflect your company and client’s values through just a few well-chosen words.

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Yes, business applications can be made fun and gamelike. No, points, levels and badges are not the way to create sustained interest. While many sites have added superficial gaming elements to make interactions more engaging, the companies that “get it” have a better understanding of the psychology behind motivation. They know how to design sites that keep people coming back again and again. So what are the secrets? What actually motivates people online? How do you create sustained interest in your product or service? Speaker Stephen P. Anderson will share common patterns from game design, learning theories, and neuroscience to reveal what motivates—and demotivates—people over the long haul.

About Stephen P Anderson

Photo of Tom CoatesStephen P. Anderson is an internationally recognized speaker and consultant based out of Dallas, Texas. He recently published the Mental Notes card deck to help product teams apply psychology to interaction design. Between public speaking and project work, Stephen offers workshops to help businesses design fun, playful and effective online experiences. He’s currently writing a book about “seductive interactions” that will be published by New Riders in 2011. Follow Stephen on Twitter: @stephenanderson
" ["post_title"]=> string(57) "Stephen P Anderson - Keynote: Sustaining Passionate Users" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(289) "

Photo of Tom CoatesYes, business applications can be made fun and gamelike. No, points, levels and badges are not the way to create sustained interest.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 2:40pm.

Presentation slides

Coming soon.

Session description

Many web designers and developers are motivated to create accessible sites because more people can use the site, more people can find the site, and more devices can access the site. As we migrate to HTML5 and CSS to develop applications, we further the opportunity to create far more inclusive results, no matter the preferences of your audience and no matter why they have those preferences: are they driving? riding in a bumpy bus? accessing content in the sun? or might they be blind? In this session, Wendy Chisholm, co-editor of WCAG 1.0, author of Universal Design for Web Applications, and one of the leading experts in accessibility and universal access helps you understand the challenges to and solutions for creating accessible apps with web technologies. Wendy will cover WAI-ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications), accessibility and HTML5, as well as some common accessibility pitfalls when designing and developing applications, particularly on mobile and tablet devices.

About the presneters

Wendy Chrisholm
Photo of Wendy ChisholmIn this session, Wendy Chisholm, co-editor of WCAG 1.0, author of Universal Design for Web Applications, and one of the leading experts in accessibility and universal access helps you understand the challenges to and solutions for creating accessible apps with web technologies. Wendy will cover WAI-ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications), accessibility and HTML5, as well as some common accessibility pitfalls when designing and developing applications, particularly on mobile and tablet devices.Wendy Chisholm is an author, activist and developer. She co-wrote “Universal Design for Web Applications” with Matt May (O’Reilly, 2008), and before that co-edited Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 and 2.0–the basis of most web accessibility policies. She has focused on inclusive web design since 1995. Being both a developer (B.S. in Computer Science) and a Human Factors Engineer (M.S. in Industrial Engineering/Human Factors), Wendy bridges communication between developers and designers. As a staff for the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) for 6 years, she helped synchronize work on the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines with developments in internationalization and mobile design.

She is currently a Senior Strategist at Microsoft, where she works to make all web-related applications throughout the company accessible.

Her personal mission is to find elegant solutions that remove barriers that prevent everyone from participating fully in society. "I am an advocate for people with disabilities, people who are injured (especially vets) and people who are aging (i.e., all of us). I want to make inclusion a reality–both online and off".

Wendy's photo is courtesy of Matt.

Follow Wendy on Twitter: @wendyabc
Charles Pritchard
Photo of Charles PritchardCharles Pritchard has founded several startups during his fifteen years as a web developer. A web standards advocate and an early adoptee of HTML5, he has produced several canvas implementations enabling web applications to run on a wide variety of virtual machines. His current focus is on creating and maintaining accessible applications as a critical component of software quality.
" ["post_title"]=> string(75) "Wendy Chisholm & Charles Pritchard - Universal Access: now for apps as well" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(645) "

Photo of Wendy ChisholmPhoto of Charles PritchardIn this session, Wendy Chisholm will help you understand the challenges to and solutions for creating accessible apps with web technologies. Wendy will cover WAI-ARIA, accessibility and HTML5, as well as some common accessibility pitfalls when designing and developing applications, particularly on mobile and tablet devices.

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Web Directions @media 2011, London, May 27th 1:40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

In 1960, Milton Bradley published “The Game of Life”: a capitalist wet dream of a board game, won by the lucky one who retired richest. Today, “gamification” vendors still take Milton Bradley seriously. From losing weight to saving Africa, from watching TV to matching DNA sequences: there’s nothing that couldn’t be made more fun by adding points, badges, and other elements from video games. At least that’s the selling proposition. Yet the debate on gamification is deeply split. On the one hand, marketers dream of customer mind control, on the other game designers warn of digital snake oil sellers and shallow ‘pointsification’. How to design a playful experience that is truly meaningful to users – instead of just creating shallow novelty effects? Which lessons do games really hold for other products and services? What criticism is valid? And how can designers interested in “gameifying” an application steer clear of the worst pitfalls?

About Sebastian Deterding

Photo of Sebastian DeterdingSebastian Deterding is a designer and researcher usually flown in for some thorough German grumpiness. He speaks and publishes internationally on gameful design, persuasive technology, and the social contexts of games at venues such as the Gamification Summit, Gamescom, reboot, or Google. His work has been covered by The Guardian, the LA Times, The New Scientist, and EDGE Magazine among others. When not designing, he pursues a PhD on the motivational psychology of ‘gameified’ applications at Hamburg University. Follow Sebastian on Twitter: @dingstweets
" ["post_title"]=> string(74) "Sebastian Deterding - Closing keynote: Don’t play games with me with me " ["post_excerpt"]=> string(485) "

Photo of Sebastian DeterdingHow to design a playful experience that is truly meaningful to users – instead of just creating shallow novelty effects? Which lessons do games really hold for other products and services? What criticism is valid? And how can designers interested in “gameifying” an application steer clear of the worst pitfalls?

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Web Directions @media 2011, London, May 27th 1:40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

That user who just signed up is about to bail. And a thousand other people just stopped in but didn’t even bother to register. Your product is great, but your users don’t stay long enough to find that out. The first fifteen minutes of your product are the most important and they’re so often squandered. But! We’re starting to figure out what works and what does not. There’s no longer any excuse to give your visitors a poor initial experience. Learn how great user interfaces entice people right out of the gate, then help newcomers get people over the threshold. Then! Great interfaces delightfully provide new users to learn complex systems and become engaged, passionate contributors. Onwards and upwards, friends.

About Daniel Burka

Photo of Daniel BurkaDaniel is a user interface designer based in San Francisco by way of Canada. He was the creative director at Digg for several years, he was a co-​​founder of a startup called Pownce, he continues as an inactive partner at the design firm silverorange, and he’s designing the UI for a game called Glitch. Daniel is passionate about designing web apps with vibrant communities. Lately, he’s especially interested in using game design techniques to engage users, especially as they learn new and complex systems. Follow Daniel on Twitter: @dburka
" ["post_title"]=> string(50) "Daniel Burka - Designing the first fifteen minutes" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(521) "

Photo of Daniel BurkaThe first fifteen minutes of your product are the most important and they’re so often squandered. But! We’re starting to figure out what works and what does not. There’s no longer any excuse to give your visitors a poor initial experience. Learn how great user interfaces entice people right out of the gate, then help newcomers get people over the threshold.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 1:40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Dear app makers, I love the stuff you have been putting out recently. Supercool maps, guides, syncing and such make my day. There’s just one little thing. As a content strategist and writer, I’ve noticed that some of your instructions aren’t as clear as they could be. The experience is not as fulfilling as it might be. I know this might not be your favourite part of the process. In fact, they are probably the bits chucked in to get it out the door. And so I have created a session to help ease the pain. I have a framework for you to build on to make sure that your next app is as pithy as it is pretty and elegant to use as it is coded. I’ll even bring a whole virtual suitcase of apps with fantastic snippets of microcopy to inspire you. It’s a pretty simple concept and it’s a bunch of fun to work on, running alongside your app development. In one sentence: it’s about creating a fulfilling experience, one that puts you ahead of your competition, simply through the power of the written word.

About Relly Annett-Baker

Photo of Relly Annett-BakerRelly Annett-Baker lives in a leafy market town with her husband and two small sons. As a result, she eats far too many cakes from Waitrose and can be guaranteed to stand on Lego at least once a day. As well as being content strategist and content writer for Headscape, she is employed as live-in domestic staff by two cats. She also writes articles and jabbers on about copy to anyone who will listen, creates scrapbooks, and continues to procrastinate over the draft for her book, a guide to creating web content for designers and developers, to be published in Spring 2011 by Five Simple Steps. She better finish this biography before her editor spots she isn’t writing her book again. Follow Relly on Twitter: @RellyAB
" ["post_title"]=> string(46) "Relly Annett-Baker - Content Strategy for Apps" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(323) "

Photo of Relly Annett-BakerIn one sentence: it’s about creating a fulfilling experience, one that puts you ahead of your competition, simply through the power of the written word.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 11:30am.

Presentation slides

Session description

Most user experience research takes place sitting behind a computer. And yet these days, most networked experiences are happening on mobile devices. Some common user experience research methods work well in a mobile environment — others don’t. In this talk, Juliette Melton will guide you through how to use some great existing research methods in a mobile context, how to incorporate some new (and fun!) methods into your arsenal, and propose next generation tools and services to make mobile user experience research even better.

About Juliette Melton

Photo of Juliette Melton Juliette has ten years of experience building, managing, and researching digital environments and is a human factors researcher based at IDEO in San Francisco. She’s deeply interested in the intersections between digital culture, learning, and communication. Her work has spanned a broad range of industries including social media, casual gaming, education administration, electronic publishing, corporate banking, computer hardware, and public health. Community education — through workshops, lectures, and writing — is an important part of her work. Remote user experience methods, agile project management, and research program planning are frequent topics. Juliette holds an MEd from the Technology, Innovation, and Education program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education where she focused on developing models for innovative networked learning applications. She also has a BA in Comparative Literature from Haverford College. Follow Juliette on Twitter: @j
" ["post_title"]=> string(49) "Juliette Melton - Mobile User Experience Research" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(424) "

Photo of Juliette MeltonIn this talk, Juliette Melton will guide you through how to use some great existing research methods in a mobile context, how to incorporate some new (and fun!) methods into your arsenal, and propose next generation tools and services to make mobile user experience research even better.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 10:45am.

Session description

The average size of an adult human’s finger pad is 10-14mm. The average size of a cursor or stylus tip is 1-2mm. That fact alone means that designing native touchscreen apps is an entirely different thing than designing web, desktop, or even traditional mobile apps. This talk outlines the most important concepts, guidelines, and practices to keep in mind when designing with fingers and hands in mind. We’ll cover interaction zones (where it’s easiest for fingers to reach), touch targets (size and distance apart), kinesiology (how fingers can bend, move, and stretch), and signaling (how users can become aware of gestures).

About Dan Saffer

Photo of Dan SafferDan Saffer is an interaction designer and the author of two books: Designing Gestural Interfaces and Designing for Interaction. He is the co-founder and one of the principals at Kicker Studio, a design consultancy in San Francisco that does “interaction-infused” product design. Since 1995, Dan has designed devices, software, websites, and services that are currently used by millions every day. He speaks at conferences and teaches workshops on interaction design all over the world. He and his products have been in BusinessWeek, Fast Company, and Wired, and his design innovations have received several patents. Follow Dan on Twitter: @odannyboy
" ["post_title"]=> string(50) "Dan Saffer - Top Ten Things To Tackle Touchscreens" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(789) "

Photo of Dan SafferThe average size of an adult human’s finger pad is 10-14mm. The average size of a cursor or stylus tip is 1-2mm. That fact alone means that designing native touchscreen apps is an entirely different thing than designing web, desktop, or even traditional mobile apps. This talk outlines the most important concepts, guidelines, and practices to keep in mind when designing with fingers and hands in mind. We’ll cover interaction zones (where it’s easiest for fingers to reach), touch targets (size and distance apart), kinesiology (how fingers can bend, move, and stretch), and signaling (how users can become aware of gestures).

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 12th 2:40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

We’ve heard it all before… prototype, prototype, prototype. It’s a standard step in almost any design process — but often the first step skipped in time and budget constrained projects. While prototyping is considered a standard step in any UX design process, it is an *essential* part of the mobile UX process. This talk will outline why prototyping is essential to part of the mobile UX process and how prolific prototyping is a necessary step for designers keen to grow the ruthless editing skills necessary to craft successful mobile experiences. This talk will also cover common and uncommon mobile prototyping tools, methods and techniques that you can apply to your project work.

About Rachel Hinman

Photo of Rachel HinmanRachel Hinman is a researcher, designer and a recognized thought leader in the mobile user experience field. Currently, Rachel is a Senior Research Scientist at the Nokia Research Center in Palo Alto, California. There she focuses on the research and design of emergent and experimental mobile interfaces and mobile experiences for emerging markets. Prior to joining Nokia, Rachel was an experience design director at Adaptive Path, and a mobile researcher and strategist for Yahoo’s mobile group. Rachel writes and speaks frequently on the topic of mobile research and design. She is the creative force behind the 90 Mobiles in 90 Days Project and her perspectives on mobile user experience has been featured in Interactions Magazine, BusinessWeek and Wired. She is currently writing a book entitled, “The Mobile Frontier: A Guide for Designing Mobile Experiences” with Rosenfeld Media. Expected publication is late 2011. Follow Rachel on Twitter: @Hinman
" ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Rachel Hinman - Mobile Prototyping Essentials" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(716) "

Photo of Rachel HinmanWe’ve heard it all before… prototype, prototype, prototype. It’s a standard step in almost any design process — but often the first step skipped in time and budget constrained projects. While prototyping is considered a standard step in any UX design process, it is an *essential* part of the mobile UX process. This talk will outline why prototyping is essential to part of the mobile UX process and how prolific prototyping is a necessary step for designers keen to grow the ruthless editing skills necessary to craft successful mobile experiences.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 1:25pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

A new generation of touch devices have proven to be exciting playgrounds for app designers. And with every new product we create, we have the opportunity to offer the most clear and efficient experience for our users. Recent UI trends often lean to realistic, faithful representations of analog controls and features. These designs can offer advantages, but also come with their own set of hazards. In this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings. We’ll talk about things like mental models, innovation and usability as they relate to lifelike UI. Finally, Aaron will share some pragmatic guidelines to keep in mind as you build the next wave of mobile and touch apps.

About Aaron Weyenberg

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergA mixed breed designer/developer, Aaron’s career is built upon a unique blend of creative and technical sensibilities. He began twelve years ago leading interactive initiatives for Colorado’s top design agencies, delivering successful projects for a range of clients including HP, Spyder Active Sports and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. In 2004 he joined ESPN New Media where he provided instrumental leadership in an Art Director role. At ESPN he guided best practices, developed core UI components and designed pioneering real time game and scoring applications. Aaron currently serves as Creative Director for Fanzter, a lean and profitable New England based startup. His work has appeared on Smashing Magazine, Six Revisions, Ajax Rain and was awarded at the 27th annual Sports Emmys. Aaron’s academic background spans three fields of study at three different universities, settling into a B.S. in Scientific and Technical Communication from Michigan Tech. His offline hobbies involve learning about social psychology and human behavior, photography, and a quest to find the perfect iPod earphones. Follow Aaron on Twitter: @aweyenberg
" ["post_title"]=> string(37) "Aaron Weyenberg - Realistic UI Design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(523) "

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergIn this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings. We’ll talk about things like mental models, innovation and usability as they relate to lifelike UI. Finally, Aaron will share some pragmatic guidelines to keep in mind as you build the next wave of mobile and touch apps.

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Web Directions Unplugged 2011, Seattle, May 13th 3:50pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

No one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. Argue about programming languages, memory management and reach all you want. There is one undeniable disadvantage that the mobile web faces that native apps don’t–over a decade of legacy code, cruft and entrenched organizational politics. But the web is essential. Even companies whose businesses are centered on native apps need web pages to sell those apps. We can demonstrate time and again that a web-based approach is a smart investment. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences? And most importantly, how should we be changing our web infrastructure, tools and workflow for the coming zombie apocalypse of devices.

About Jason Grigsby

Jason Grigsby PortraitJason Grigsby was one of the project leads on the Obama ’08 iPhone Application and helped design the user interface for the Wall Street Journal’s Blackberry application. Jason is a co-founder of Cloud Four, a small start-up focused on mobile web development. He founded and organizes Mobile Portland. Jason is currently co-authoring Head First Mobile Web for O’Reilly Publishing. The book will be available this winter. Follow Jason on Twitter: @grigs
" ["post_title"]=> string(69) "Jason Grigsby - Keynote: Native is Easy. Mobile Web is Freaking Hard!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(490) "

Jason Grigsby PortraitNo one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences?

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Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

Computers are increasingly being held in the hand rather than sitting atop lap or desk. We now have to consider how our products will work underneath a finger instead of a mouse cursor. Increasingly, too, those products are being delivered as native applications, capable of fully exploiting device capabilities. That has ramifications not only for the way those projects get built, but also how we structure the businesses that support them. In this session, Michael Honey and Tim Riley answer the question “web or native?” from business, product design and development perspectives. They cover the current state of web technology on modern devices and compare it to what’s available through native development platforms. They’ll look at web, native and hybrid strategies successfully employed by Australian and international businesses, and share their own stories as mobile and web developers. Finally, they’ll offer practical guidance on picking a strategy for web or native development that best suits your needs — as either a developer or a client. Tim and Michael are two of the partners behind Icelab, an Australian design and development studio. They’ve trod both the web and native paths through their client work, such as interactive touchscreens for museum exhibits, online photo galleries and mobile tour guides, and also their own projects, like Decaf Sucks, a coffee review community available on the web (optimised for both desktops and smartphones) and as a native iPhone app.

About Michael Honey

Photo of Michael HoneyMichael founded Icelab after a career as creative director and later, interactive director in an agency environment. He has fifteen years’ experience in design for screen, print, video and exhibition spaces, and has expertise in writing, programming, direction and post-production. He is an experienced coder, with a particular interest in algorithmic animation and datavisualisation. He is also experienced in the development of diagrammatic animations for cultural, engineering, scientific and architectural clients. Michael’s interests include architecture, urbanism, and the environment. Follow Michael on Twitter: @michaelhoney

About Tim Riley

Photo of Tim RileyTim is a partner at Australian design and development studio Icelab, where he builds excellent web and mobile applications using Ruby on Rails, JavaScript, Cocoa, and occasionally out of popsicle sticks. On alternate days he runs Decaf Sucks, an online community for coffee reviews, and RentMonkey, which contains the greatest on the Internet. Tim is an active participant in the Australian web and iOS communities, as a regular speaker at the Sydney Ruby on Rails meetings, organiser of the Canberra Ruby Crew, and part of the Canberra Cocoaheads chapter. Tim loves coffee and hates gluten. Follow Tim on Twitter: " ["post_title"]=> string(76) "Michael Honey & Tim Riley - Web or native? Smart choices for smartphone apps" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(446) "

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Presentations about user experience

Podcasts, slides, videos and more

Michael Honey & Tim Riley — Web or native? Smart choices for smartphone apps

Photo of Michael HoneyPhoto of Tim RileyIn this session, Michael Honey and Tim Riley answer the question “web or native?” from business, product design and development perspectives. See the slides and hear the podcast »

Alex Young — Multi-​​device, Multi-​​role

Photo of Alex YoungHow do you approach designing experiences that span multiple platforms and devices, contexts and roles to meet the evolving needs of our audiences?

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Aaron Weyenberg — Getting Real: Pros and Pitfalls of Realistic UI Design

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergIn this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Mike Kuniavsky — Design [in|for|and] the age of ubiquitous computing

Photo of Mike KuniavskyThis talk will discuss where ubiquitous computing is today, some changes we can already see happening, and how we can begin to think about the implications of these technologies for design, for business and for the world at large.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Relly Annett-​​Baker — All The Small Things

Photo of Relly Annett-BakerIn this session, Relly will show you how you can bolster sales and reflect your company and client’s values through just a few well-​​chosen words.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Stephen P Anderson — Keynote: Sustaining Passionate Users

Photo of Tom CoatesYes, business applications can be made fun and gamelike. No, points, levels and badges are not the way to create sustained interest.

See the slides and hear the podcast »

Wendy Chisholm & Charles Pritchard — Universal Access: now for apps as well

Photo of Wendy ChisholmPhoto of Charles PritchardIn this session, Wendy Chisholm will help you understand the challenges to and solutions for creating accessible apps with web technologies. Wendy will cover WAI-​​ARIA, accessibility and HTML5, as well as some common accessibility pitfalls when designing and developing applications, particularly on mobile and tablet devices.

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Sebastian Deterding — Closing keynote: Don’t play games with me with me

Photo of Sebastian DeterdingHow to design a playful experience that is truly meaningful to users – instead of just creating shallow novelty effects? Which lessons do games really hold for other products and services? What criticism is valid? And how can designers interested in “gameifying” an application steer clear of the worst pitfalls?

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Daniel Burka — Designing the first fifteen minutes

Photo of Daniel BurkaThe first fifteen minutes of your product are the most important and they’re so often squandered. But! We’re starting to figure out what works and what does not. There’s no longer any excuse to give your visitors a poor initial experience. Learn how great user interfaces entice people right out of the gate, then help newcomers get people over the threshold.

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Relly Annett-​​Baker — Content Strategy for Apps

Photo of Relly Annett-BakerIn one sentence: it’s about creating a fulfilling experience, one that puts you ahead of your competition, simply through the power of the written word.

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Juliette Melton — Mobile User Experience Research

Photo of Juliette MeltonIn this talk, Juliette Melton will guide you through how to use some great existing research methods in a mobile context, how to incorporate some new (and fun!) methods into your arsenal, and propose next generation tools and services to make mobile user experience research even better.

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Dan Saffer — Top Ten Things To Tackle Touchscreens

Photo of Dan SafferThe average size of an adult human’s finger pad is 10-​​14mm. The average size of a cursor or stylus tip is 1-​​2mm. That fact alone means that designing native touchscreen apps is an entirely different thing than designing web, desktop, or even traditional mobile apps. This talk outlines the most important concepts, guidelines, and practices to keep in mind when designing with fingers and hands in mind. We’ll cover interaction zones (where it’s easiest for fingers to reach), touch targets (size and distance apart), kinesiology (how fingers can bend, move, and stretch), and signaling (how users can become aware of gestures).

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Rachel Hinman — Mobile Prototyping Essentials

Photo of Rachel HinmanWe’ve heard it all before… prototype, prototype, prototype. It’s a standard step in almost any design process — but often the first step skipped in time and budget constrained projects. While prototyping is considered a standard step in any UX design process, it is an *essential* part of the mobile UX process. This talk will outline why prototyping is essential to part of the mobile UX process and how prolific prototyping is a necessary step for designers keen to grow the ruthless editing skills necessary to craft successful mobile experiences.

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Aaron Weyenberg — Realistic UI Design

Photo of Aaron WeyenbergIn this session Aaron will lead you on a tour of current trends and practices, examining the strengths and drawbacks that realism brings. We’ll talk about things like mental models, innovation and usability as they relate to lifelike UI. Finally, Aaron will share some pragmatic guidelines to keep in mind as you build the next wave of mobile and touch apps.

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Jason Grigsby — Keynote: Native is Easy. Mobile Web is Freaking Hard!

Jason Grigsby PortraitNo one who advocates for the mobile web wants to admit it, but it is true. Native is easier. It’s easier to sell to stakeholders. Easier to monetize. And most importantly, easier to implement. So how do we sell mobile web projects? How do we work with the systems we currently have to build compelling mobile web experiences?

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