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Read on for all the details, or visit the Respond site. Way back in 2014, we launched Respond, a "popup" single day conference focusing on the challenges of what was, then still in its relative infancy, Responsive Web Design. In the years since, we've changed a lot about the event, and indeed all our events. Where once Web Directions was all about the main, end-of-year, multi-track Web Directions South - a big top under which we strove to bring all the family working on web-based apps and sites - we've moved on to a model of smaller, more focused events that we bring to multiple cities. As the conference formerly known as Web Directions morphed into Direction, and focused on the big picture at the intersection of Design, Technology and Strategy, Respond has grown from an event largely focused on implementation details for front end designers and developers in a multi form factor world, to encompass the whole range of front end design and user experience challenges. This year, we are genuinely excited to have brought together a program of extraordinary speakers, covering a broad range of topics of direct and ongoing relevance to your entire front end team. As always, and in keeping with our curatorial approach, a great deal of thought has gone into what we'll cover (and who should cover it). One key challenge in putting together programs is to find the "Goldilocks Zone" of content – not something the audience knows too well, and not something too far out across the horizon. Not chasing fads, yet not limited to the mundane. With that in mind, some of the key topics Respond will cover include * design languages and systems (including a keynote from the renowned Mina Markham, who developed the design language for the Hillary for America campaign, 'Pantsuit', and an intensive look at the work of the Westpac CX team and their Global Experience Language, and SEEK's use of design systems to help improve communication between design and development teams) * conversational and "chat" (or natural language) interfaces, with perspectives from Elizabeth Allen at Shopify, and local experts. Is there a "there" there? Is it hype, or reality? Let's find out * accessibility, with Cordelia McGee-Tubbs from Dropbox looking at how they make such a complex web application accessible, along with local accessibility hero Adem Cifcioglu * animation and motion design, with Rachel Nabors and locals showing the way toward an animated web * typefaces and typography, the way text is used in digital experiences, by the people who make them There's always room the underlying technologies of HTML, CSS and SVG, though as always, our approach is not about a laundry list of features, but rather the outcomes you can achieve using these technologies – including better typography, and more engaging experiences through animation. Overall, we've put together a program that addresses design issues we'll all be dealing with in the coming year, or years. These aren't just "hot topics", these are the challenges we're facing now and going forwards, and Respond has pulled together speakers who are showing the way forward in resolving them and advancing front end design. Respond really is for your whole front end team." ["post_title"]=> string(56) "Announcing Respond 2017, our front end design conference" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(55) "announcing-respond-2017-our-front-end-design-conference" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-10 09:06:59" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-09 22:06:59" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6998" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#233 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6987) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-08 10:00:06" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-07 23:00:06" ["post_content"]=> string(2547) "Fiona ChanOur Video Ristretto this week features Fiona Chan, who many CSS loving Sydneysiders will know as one of the hosts of the CSS Sydney meetup, and our conference attendees will know as a regular volunteer at our events, helping to ensure everything runs smoothly. But Fiona is also a fine speaker in her own right, and at Code 16 gave a tremendously useful talk on how to review your code to make sure everything is shipshape - something all of us could probably pay more attention to. And no, linting is not enough. See for yourself.    

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Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.
" ["post_title"]=> string(56) "Video Ristretto: Fiona Chan - CSS: Code Smell Sanitation" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(54) "video-ristretto-fiona-chan-css-code-smell-sanitation-2" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-07 21:40:55" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-07 10:40:55" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6987" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#234 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6977) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-07 10:00:39" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-06 23:00:39" ["post_content"]=> string(25148) "We know that no matter how excited you are to attend Transform 17, it can be a terrifying task to ask your boss to pay for your ticket. You and I both know that attending this conference is a valuable investment to your professional and personal development … but how do we get your boss on board? Let us help you with this. We’ve thought of all the questions, concerns and the ‘buts’ your boss might have about you attending, and so here are some answers and resources that show the value you and your boss will get from your attendance at Transform 17. Q. How will attending Transform 17 help the company? A. As Australia’s premier conference on digital service delivery in government, Transform 17 will give you access to practitioners and thought leaders working in digital transformation from around the globe, so there will be tons of content to support your company’s digital transformation goals, whatever they may be. This year, our main speakers come from the UK, USA and Australia, and are themselves practitioners engaged in the same process of digital transformation, and so the topics you will hear about are not only relevant but also rich in practical, real-world advice that you can implement straightaway. Q. What will you learn at Transform 17 that you can’t learn somewhere else? A. You will hear the about the latest trends, insights and ‘what not to do’ in government service delivery from people working in some of the world’s largest government departments – where else can you learn from people that have worked in the NYC Mayor’s office and Gov.UK? Transform 2017 also features a full-day workshop in two parts that will let you get a little more hands-on. Dan Sheldon will lead you through A survival guide for digital government, taking an “honest look at the way government works" and then Sarah Atkinson takes over for Real World Transformation: “tools and techniques which form the foundation of affecting transformation.” Q. How will Transform help you professionally? A. Part of our mission at Web Directions is to help people move up in their careers and so we’ve ensured that Transform 17 delivers great content that both equips you with the actionable knowledge you need to do your job better, and the inspiration to return to the office with a new sense of energy. Networking plays a huge part in all our events, and at Transform 17 there will be opportunities across the two days to make organic connections with your industry peers which is great to way to start new partnerships, promote your company and build your personal brand. Tip: When asking, don’t dance – just ask Often, people nervously bring up the subject of the conference with their bosses and rarely ask them directly to attend. Instead, they ask what the boss thinks about it first and then it doesn’t get mentioned again. Don’t let this happen with Transform 17. Tell your boss you want to attend and ask whether they’ll foot the bill. They may say yes or no, but at least you know exactly where you stand.  
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  Transform 17 " ["post_title"]=> string(54) "How to Convince the Boss You Should Go to Transform 17" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "convince-boss-go-transform-17" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-07 19:38:37" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-07 08:38:37" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6977" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#235 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6966) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-06 10:00:54" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-05 23:00:54" ["post_content"]=> string(5423) "From May 2013 to July 2015, Leisa Reichelt was Head of User Research for the Government Digital Service in the UK. That placed her in the middle - or perhaps at the forefront - of a revolution of sorts, a transformation of how British government offices and agencies make information available to its citizens, drawing on new and emerging technology and a user-centred design approach. Leisa then came back to Australia to become Head of Service Design and User Research at the Digital Transformation Office (now Digital Transformation Agency), seeking to achieve a similar transformation here - a transformation that is ongoing and which is the focus of our Transform conference. Leisa spoke at the first Transform in 2016, and as we near this year's event (Canberra, 29-30 March), it's timely to see how Wrap summarised her talk.

User-centred Government Through Digital Services

Leisa Reichelt, Head of Service Design and User Research, Digital Transformation Office

Leisa Reichelt

Key points

The impending federal election means that there are limits on what can be discussed at the conference, due to the government being in caretaker mode. The Digital Transformation Office aims to help federal Australian government departments to redefine how they provide their services online. There are over 4,500 government websites in Australia. Over 55% of users can’t find the information they need. Government keeps asking people to give them the same information over and over and over again, which is annoying. People think mostly in terms of one government that should therefore have all their information. People worry that if they make a mistake in providing information to government they will be punished. DTO is aiming for a way in which users can obtain integrated information through a primary online interface.
"People shouldn’t have to know how government works in order to use government services."
Transform 16, Leisa Reichelt

Takeways

User research has to be a team effort with all members focused on understanding user needs. Users most want a consistent approach across their experiences with online government services. Anxiety and fear is too often a hallmark of users’ interaction with government websites. One issue is that various government departments don’t know how to work together, and need to be taught. A guiding principle is that people dealing with government are going through a transition and information should be designed around that model. The transition model requires understanding the user context and presenting them with integrated information about their options. Understanding user context is a specific process requiring skills, empathy and a lot of research.
"User experience is the responsibility of the entire team."
Transform 16, Leisa Reichelt

Caveats

Cross-department coordination is a mammoth task, but it is mandated by law. Even though experts have been addressing these issues for years, we still have information silos with massive gaps between them. Conway’s Law states that organisations will tend to design systems that mimic their own communication structures, not focus on user needs. Government has no proper view of the service user’s experience of government. There’s so much about forms we get wrong so much of the time. User research is a team sport. Transform 16, Leisa Reichelt

Resources

@leisa website slides

Tweets

Transform 16, Leisa Reichelt Transform 16, Leisa Reichelt Transform 16, Leisa Reichelt Transform 16, Leisa Reichelt " ["post_title"]=> string(79) "Transform 16: User-centred Government Through Digital Services - Leisa Reichelt" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(68) "transform-16-user-centred-government-digital-services-leisa-reichelt" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-14 21:43:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-14 10:43:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6966" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#236 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6960) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-03 14:51:08" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-03 03:51:08" ["post_content"]=> string(3514) "

The future had arrived. It's still not evenly distributed.

Braille reader In conversation, I often bring up someone I refer to as "the most connected man in the world", who I met over a decade ago and who is still the most connected person I've ever met, all these years later. For the younger folks in the audience, let me set the scene. We're in New Zealand. It's 2004 or perhaps early 2005. There are no iPhones. Few people have anything that remotely resembles today's smartphones. Mobile internet was ridiculously expensive and pathetically slow. Internet Explorer on Windows was still utterly dominant among browsers. I'd flown to New Zealand to do a presentation for the folks who a little later would start WebStock. WebStock founder Mike Brown picked me up from the airport, along with a speaker from New Zealand who was totally blind. We chatted away as we drove into Wellington, and then at one point he turned around and apologised for perhaps being a little distracted, he was just catching up on his emails. So, why is this in any way noteworthy? We all check emails (and then then non-existent Twitter, Facebook, Slack channels, news) constantly, even flying across oceans. It's hard to imagine that back then folks didn't spend their lives staring at screens like we do these days. As I mentioned, mobile internet was expensive, rare and slow. Wifi hotspots in public were few and far between. But it stays in my mind since I'd otherwise have had no idea he was checking his email then and there. His hand was inside his jacket, and via a braille interface to a Widows CE device (the company he worked for made these hardware add-ons to Windows PDAs ('personal digital assistant' was the name we used then for what became smartphones). The internet even then was woven more seamlessly into his life than smartphones are for us today. It was both fully enabled, and yet he could still connect entirely with those around him in conversation. I've often thought back to that afternoon when thinking about the way in which humans interface with networks. He was more connected then than we are even now, despite using a device several orders of magnitudes slower than today's, on networks far slower and less reliable, because that connectivity augmented his connection to the world, rather than partially replacing it. Some folks might argue that the natural successor to his connectedness would be an AR experience not unlike Google Glass. But I increasingly think it's our ears that will connect us to networks, first with devices like Apple's Airpods, but in the not too distant future with devices closer to cochlear ear implants (currently the preserve of people with hearing loss), that won't simply augment our hearing, but unobtrusively deliver time and location based information as we move through the world. They'll prompt us with the name of a person we're approaching. They'll remind us as we pass the convenience store we frequent that we need milk. They'll give us experiences more like those explored in Spike Jonze's film Her, rather than a Robocop-style heads-up display. Even so, and no matter how our network connections evolve, I'm not sure I'll ever be as connected as the most connected man in the world, in 2004, in Wellington, New Zealand." ["post_title"]=> string(31) "The Most Connected Man on Earth" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(19) "connected-man-earth" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-03 14:51:08" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-03 03:51:08" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6960" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#237 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6955) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-03 13:13:17" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-03 02:13:17" ["post_content"]=> string(1758) "At Respond last year, Jen Simmons gave a very well received session on the current state of CSS layout and the role of Real Art Direction on the Web. Today, much more of what Jen described is possible, thanks to CSS Grid, so this seems like a good time to watch it again. It also gives us an excuse to remind you that our Call For Proposals for THIS year's Respond conference closes today! If this is the first you've heard of it and you want to submit a proposal but fear you'll run out of time, contact us. We'll work it out. Meantime, here's Jen.     Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.



" ["post_title"]=> string(47) "Video of the Week - Jen Simmons at Respond 2016" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(35) "video-week-jen-simmons-respond-2016" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-03 13:13:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-03 02:13:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6955" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#238 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6947) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-02 13:55:58" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-02 02:55:58" ["post_content"]=> string(2972) "Since Alex Russell, who coined the term Progressive Web App and outlined the concept, first spoke publicly about them at our Code 2015 conference (watch the video below), this approach to developing powerful, engaging web applications has become extremely popular, and has been adopted by some really significant brands, as well as being deeply integrated into the Android platform. Progressive Web Apps combine a number of Web technologies, including Web Manifests, Service Workers and Push Notifications but, above all, provide a conceptual framework - both for developers and users - for installable, native-like experiences that work even when a user is offline, and which integrate into the user's device and are embedded on the homescreen, but are also plain old Web sites for platforms that don't support all the PWA technologies yet.

PWA Roadshow coming to Sydney in two weeks!

If you're keen to learn more and start building PWAs (or if you already are), then Google is bringing a number of its key engineers in this area to Sydney in a couple of weeks for a free day of presentations and hands-on workshops for the Progressive Web App Roadshow. The folks at Google asked Web Directions to help make sure the day is a great experience for all attendees (since that's something we do rather well) and we wanted to make sure that you - as someone who's been to our events - get the first chance to RSVP for what will be a full house. It's on in a couple of weeks, Thursday 16 March, at Dockside, Darling Harbour in Sydney, about five minutes walk from Town Hall Station, nicely catered, with some world leading speakers, and it's completely free!

The lowdown

What: Progressive Web App Roadshow Where: Dockside, Darling Harbour, Sydney When: 9am-5pm Thursday 16 March How Much: Free! Why: To get started with, or go deeper into Progressive Web Apps

More like this at Code 2017

There will, of course, be much more along these lines at Code, taking place in Sydney, Melbourne and for the first time this year in Brisbane in late July and early August. We'll be announcing the lineup for this in a few weeks, but you can register right now if you want to lock in the best price." ["post_title"]=> string(57) "Google's Progressive Web App Roadshow is Coming to Sydney" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(56) "googles-progressive-web-app-roadshow-is-coming-to-sydney" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-02 13:55:58" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-02 02:55:58" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6947" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#239 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6872) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-02 10:00:54" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-01 23:00:54" ["post_content"]=> string(8466) "With the Early Bird prices for Transform 17 closing tomorrow (Fri 3/3), it's a good time to remind you that the event is more than just a day of talks. Our Masterclass this year is divided into two workshops, and should be a full-on day with two experts. Attendees of last year's workshop with Jared Spool and Dana Chisnell will attest that it was a remarkable day: intense, funny, insightful, sometimes shocking (some of their poor UX examples!) and entirely absorbing. Here's how we described it in Wrap magazine.

Deconstructing Delight

Jared Spool and Dana Chisnell

Jared Spool, Transform 16Dana Chisnell Masterclass - Canberra 18 May, Sydney 23 May Jared Spool and Dana Chisnell each have a rich history of working in the usability field, and it shows in their poise as speakers, their confidence in their research and the way they each create a detailed structure that others can draw on and use. Above all, what shines through is their intelligence, which informs the empathy that underpins their approach to User Experience, and the humour they bring to the discussion. It is entirely appropriate that our hosts were clearly intent on giving us attendees a delightful as well as informative experience.

Context

The full day Masterclass took place the day before the Transform conference, at which both presenters would be keynote speakers. Dana has been running a workshop based on this concept for a few years now, with Jared becoming more involved recently. The delight that is being deconstructed in the title is that which users feel when they have an exceptionally positive experience, one that goes beyond the merely usable. The contention is that the first part of enhancing user experience is to get rid of the things that make something a poor experience, thereby reaching what should be the default position of being satisfactory, of being usable. The next part involves lifting the user experience beyond the usable to the delightful, to a degree where the user develops, maintains and shares a commitment to the product or service that gave them the delightful experience. This Masterclass was about deconstructing what lifts an experience from the usable to the delightful.

Transform

The conference, of course, focused specifically on government digital services and how they are in a process of transformation to user centred design. This workshop didn’t seem to focus on government, especially. Well, it turns out that, first of all, pretty much every principle of creating delight that applies to a commercial experiences applies even more so to dealing with government online. Sometimes tenfold. Second, when one of the presenters is a design researcher for the US Digital Service, you can be pretty sure they’re up to speed with how delight applies – or should, but doesn’t, apply – to the way people use – or don’t use – government online services. If filling out an online form to book an aeroplane flight is difficult and frustrating, imagine the impact if the exercise is about obtaining assistance to put food on the family table. Which is why any discussion of delight in a user experience necessarily has to reference frustration, and even more so in the context of online government services. Maybe tenfold.
Don’t fall in love with the solutions - love the problems.
Transform 16 Masterclass

Setup

The 50 or so people who attended were arranged around seven large round tables in the former Members Dining Room, giving plenty of room for note-taking and creature comforts. It was a mixed group, with some people attending only this masterclass and not the conference proper. At my table, there were state government workers from interstate, local government workers from regional NSW, federal government workers from just down the road and independent contractors who work with government. At other tables, I could also see some of the conference speakers, taking the opportunity to see what Jared and Dana had to say.

Hands-on

The neat pile of multi-coloured post-it notes, sharpies and paper in each table’s centre indicated we would be doing some hands-on work this day, and so it turned out. Small groups of 2-3 people tackled a task involving writing out positive and negative scenarios for a fictional government application process. It will probably surprise no-one that we were all much better at thinking up elaborate negative situations that would frustrate the user, but it was also interesting to see how each of those, once identified, could be turned around into a positive state. As an exercise in identifying user road-blocks and removing them, it was a confidence building process. And, of course, it had us all talking - in our little groups, as a table and then to the whole room.
We’re all trying to do something that actually makes the world better.
Transform 16 Masterclass

Takeaways

So, after a full day with these two, what did we come away with? Usability is a neutral experience – to make something usable is simply to remove the obstacles to it being used properly. That is certainly something to aim for, but it won’t create delight in users. Experience rot – adding more and more features doesn’t improve usability, per se. It can add complexity, frustration and a degenerated user experience. Delight comes from pleasure, flow and meaning – pleasure can come from a tone of voice, an attitude to users or even just providing complete information that satisfies the user; flow is enhanced when unnecessary steps are removed, letting the user move through a process with as little disruption as possible; meaning comes from delivering information that is authentic, credible, contextual, appropriate and useful. Those are three paths that can separately or collectively lead to user delight. Kano Model – in the 1980s, Japanese customer satisfaction expert Noriaka Kano created a tool for designers based on two axes representing levels of frustration and investment, against which were plotted three influencing forces: * performance payoff (where greater investment in planning and implementing features leads to user delight) * basic expectations (functionality that users expect but doesn’t work properly will cause frustration) * excitement generators (the touches that lift a user experience and create delight) Innovation is how we get from current experience to aspirations – innovation is not about inventing things; it’s about creating value where it didn’t previously exist. There was actually a lot more packed into this day – I haven’t touched on the Growth Stages for individual and organisational development (very logical and enlightening), nor have I conveyed how all this information came to us through dozens of anecdotes from real life that illustrated the points being made. All in all, this was a highly effective masterclass that took us from creating user experiences that simply don’t suck to aiming for experiences that will delight users and drive long term engagement.

Tweets

Transform 16 Masterclass tweets" ["post_title"]=> string(81) "Transform 16 Masterclass: Deconstructing Delight with Jared Spool & Dana Chisnell" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(73) "transform-16-masterclass-deconstructing-delight-jared-spool-dana-chisnell" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-02 10:29:46" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-01 23:29:46" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6872" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#240 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6889) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-03-01 10:00:00" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-28 23:00:00" ["post_content"]=> string(2595) "Simon KnoxThis week's Video Ristretto comes from last year's Respond conference (you do know there's currently a Call For Proposals for Respond 17, right?) in the form of Simon Knox and his talk about the Incremental responsive redesign at Kogan.com. At 35 minutes, this is a slightly longer talk than most Ristretti, and then there's also 10 minutes of questions from the audience at the end, but I think you'll find the time flies by in this engaging, insightful and often very funny case study, of sorts.  

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.
" ["post_title"]=> string(74) "Video Ristretto: Simon Knox - Incremental responsive redesign at Kogan.com" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(71) "video-ristretto-simon-knox-incremental-responsive-redesign-at-kogan-com" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-02-28 22:49:11" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-28 11:49:11" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6889" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#241 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6868) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-02-28 16:41:21" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-28 05:41:21" ["post_content"]=> string(8458) "Our Transform conference in Canberra is just over a month away (early bird closes Friday 3 March), and we want to share some insights into Dan Sheldon, who is doing double time as workshop presenter and conference speaker.  Dan's presentation at Transform is titled The Government IT Self-Harm Playbook. This draws on a highly influential article Dan published on Medium on 31 October last year of the same name, which is a bit of a must-read if you're interested in government digital transformation. In his Transform talk, Dan will walk you through an A to Z of the worst government IT anti-patterns and show how we get from traditional, outsourced, waterfall IT to delivering digital services that users love. Dan Sheldon And he has the background to cover this in detail.
"I'm currently the Digital Strategy Lead for the Department of Health, where I'm helping the department understand its role in the new digital healthcare economy. Previously I helped start up the new NHS.UK service."
The National Health Service, that's quite some project. You can see in Dan's immediate work history how he got to that kind of scale, but what's also interesting is to look at what he was up to when he was younger and how that might have influenced some of his approach today. In 2001, Michael Lewis published a book called Next: The Future Just Happened, about how emerging technology can turn the existing power structures of society upside down. Next: The Future Just Happened You might know Michael Lewis from Liar's Poker (Wall St greed in the 80s), or Moneyball (data-based approach to pro sport), or The Big Short (the US housing bubble), or any of his other books. In Next, he went looking for someone to talk to about Gnutella, the peer-to-peer file sharing network formed in 2000.
Together with a small team of web surfers I went looking for an articulate spokesman for the revolutionary point of view. Less than a year after its formation the movement was already too far-flung for one person to investigate it easily. The Napster Flood had fragmented it into what was essentially a lot of small, informal R&D projects. There were dozens of web sites and chat rooms and message boards devoted to Gnutella, and its potential successors.
Eventually, a spokesperson is tracked down in England.
"Oldham." "Where the hell is that?" "Outside Manchester." "Let's go see him." "There's a problem", said David, "He's bright, very articulate." "So what's the problem?" "He's got to check with his mother." Daniel Sheldon was fourteen years old.
Once Lewis has reassured Dan's mother his visit is not related to Warner Brothers' demands regarding Dan's Harry Potter fan website, Daniel goes on to give Lewis some keen insights into the role of technology in the exercise of rights and the empowerment of the anonymous online individual.
"Well", he said, "look at my own experiences. Look how different that is from anything that has ever happened in the real world. I couldn't walk into a traditional business, aged thirteen, and expect a fully paid job, and start ordering people about. But in the digital world I can do that. Have done it. It brings me to the same level."
It's very much a book worth reading. By the time it was published, Dan had founded Boomselection, an MP3 blog that promoted mashup challenges for bootleggers, mixing and mashing recorded tracks to create new audio artworks. In the few years of its existence, Boomselection attracted hundreds of participants from all over the globe, thousands of submitted tracks and quite a bit of interest from litigious copyright holders. Dan attended the London School of Economics and Political Science from 2005-10, emerging with a degree in Government, and the experience of having been elected by LSE students to serve in a full-time sabbatical leadership role as Communications Officer for the Student Union with specific responsibility for managing all central communications, marketing, fundraising and publications including a weekly newspaper. Having sourced external funding of £30,000 to overhaul the web presence of the union, and led staffing restructures and cross-union collaborations, Dan ended up on:
"a four-member trustee board, overseeing a charitable membership organisation serving 9,000 students with 25 full-time employees, five commercial services and a turnover of over £2.5 million."
Daniel then worked for a year as Campaigns Director at the Union of Jewish Students, the chief political representative for the 8,500 Jewish students in the UK and Ireland, further honing his political, economic management, civic leadership and positive disruption skills. It would have been no surprise that in 2010 Dan also started the ultimately successful No to 55% campaign against proposed changes to the rules governing the dissolution of Parliament. Methods Digital In 2012 Dan joined Methods, where he helped start Methods Digital, helping big business, government departments and public bodies transform their operations and their service delivery. Dan worked on forward thinking cloud strategies for local government and established breakthrough strategic partnerships with non-government partners like Amazon Web Services, Salesforce and Box. From there, Dan's path took him to a position as Senior Technology Advisor at the Government Digital Service and on to his current role as Digital Strategy Lead for the Department of Health. Here he is in action at a panel session for the UK Data Service's Data Impact 2015 event in December 2015: From teenage undergound file sharing spokesperson to one of the key figures driving the digital transformation of UK government information and services is quite a path, and you get the feeling Dan Sheldon has a lot more to achieve yet. If you want to keep up with Dan's work, you can find him here: linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sheldonline medium: https://medium.com/@sheldonline nhs.uk blog: http://transformation.blog.nhs.uk/author/dan-sheldon twitter: https://twitter.com/sheldonline website: http://www.sheldonline.com/about/ If you want see Dan in person, come along to Transform 17 in Canberra at the end of March. See you there." ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Transform 17 Speaker Insights - Dan Sheldon" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "transform-17-speaker-insights-dan-sheldon" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-02-28 16:41:21" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-28 05:41:21" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6868" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#242 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6866) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-02-27 10:00:04" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-26 23:00:04" ["post_content"]=> string(4624) "So, we've extended the Early Bird discount period for Transform 2017 in Canberra (29-30 March) by one week to this Friday, 3 March. In the meantime, here's another Wrap summary from last year's Transform, this one a look at a partnership between government and a commercial agency.

Common Ground, A Content Case Study

Mel Flanagan, Producer, Nook Studios

Mel Flanagan Common Ground is a NSW Government web service designed to improve transparency, communication and understanding of the complex issues related to exploration and mining in NSW.

Key points

Common Ground is an example of a project where the information to meet community user needs exists, but in such a form that the community cannot easily access it or understand it. The New South Wales state government needed to give people meaningful access to information about mining operations. Existing information sources were designed to meet the needs of government and industry stakeholders and were not focused on community concerns. Key documents were difficult to access and often impenetrable to community members. The government needed to find a new way to communicate with the community but didn’t know how to do it. Nook Studios set out to aggregate, collate and present data from a range of sources that would meet community information needs about mining in NSW.
"The nature of the project changed the more we learned."
Transform 16

Takeaways

User research is critical to understand what the community does know, doesn’t know, wants to know and needs to know. Content research is critical to understand the context, purpose and relationships of the data. Once you have everyone’s support, coming in with an outsider’s view is beneficial. Common Ground took a whole-of-government approach to a broad but specific interest area, in this case mining. It’s important that the project presents information in a neutral way, especially because the topic is emotional, controversial and politically sensitive. The over-riding focus remained the community, but both industry and government found benefit. Creative, innovative, agile, project focused: private agencies can help government achieve transformation.
“Getting the right people in the room is very very important and can be quite difficult.”
Mel Flanagan

Caveats

Specialist skill is needed in wrangling the technologies that collect the data and present in a structured, meaningful way. Specialist skill is needed to research, produce and manage the content for the intended audience. Government procurement systems are not sympathetic to small external agencies. We had a really hard time getting the department’s head around the fact that Common Ground was not just a website. It’s a service and should be continuously improved and added to. The project took longer than planned, not least because getting live data to work with took 18 months.

Resources

@nookstudios website

Tweets

Transform 16 These extracts are taken from Wrap magazine, the free digital magazine we publish after every conference that summarises every presentation (and a bit more). You are welcome to download this and every issue of Wrap. Transform 2016 took place at Old Parliament House in Canberra, 18-19 May 2016.  " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Transform 16: Common Ground, A Content Case Study - Mel Flanagan" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(58) "transform-16-common-ground-content-case-study-mel-flanagan" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-02-26 23:58:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-26 12:58:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6866" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [11]=> object(WP_Post)#243 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6862) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-02-24 15:21:41" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-24 04:21:41" ["post_content"]=> string(3841) "Every other week, I recommend some links to articles and online resources I think you might enjoy reading over the weekend.

Pixar in a Box

Regular readers will know of my love of (perhaps obsession with) animation, particularly the animation of Pixar. In conjunction with Khan Academy, Pixar has just released "Pixar in a Box", 'a behind-the-scenes look at how Pixar artists do their jobs. You will be able to animate bouncing balls, build a swarm of robots, and make virtual fireworks explode'.

Designing conversational experiences

Conversational interfaces, while having been around for a long long time, are incandescent right now. But we're really only at the beginning of what many feel is a revolution in UI (and others feel are overhyped fads.) I vacillate to some extent (and am currently watching Her, Spike Jonze's 2013 film centred on the idea of conversational AIs and the relationships their–owners? employers? what exactly?– form with them) but do think there is probably a "there" there. Google's design team certainly does, and has brought together a range of resources to start implementing conversational interfaces. Read it online, or download it as a PDF. Expect much more on this at our events in the coming months and years.

Friction

When building products, you’re always either removing, adding or masking friction. Back in 2009 for the original Scroll Magazine (which we resurrected last year, with a new edition is in production as well speak), I wrote an essay on friction and how the Web enables new things by removing it. At the time I used the then still quite novel option of booking travel online, but it's what underscores ride sharing, the teribly named "sharing economy" and other entirely new categories of business that have since emerged. In this piece, Kintan Brahmbhatt, the Director of Product Management and Engineering at Amazon, who's also deeply interested in the idea of friction, looks at examples of how reducing friction can make products, including Amazon's conversational (see, it's everywhere already) Alexa a more seamless experience. I send out my links for Weekend Reading in our weekly email newsletter, alternating each week with an article I write myself. If you'd like to get our newsletter in your email inbox each week - and score yourself a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine - use the form below to sign up. Your info is safe with us.



" ["post_title"]=> string(21) "Weekend Reading Links" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(23) "weekend-reading-links-2" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-02-24 15:24:18" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-24 04:24:18" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6862" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [12]=> object(WP_Post)#244 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6891) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-02-24 10:00:04" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-23 23:00:04" ["post_content"]=> string(1614) "Video of the Week is back for 2017. These are videos of full length conference presentations, typically 45 minutes to an hour long, often keynotes and always fascinating. I can't think of a better option for the first Video of the Week for 2017 than Karen McGrane with her closing keynote address from Respond 16. It's just short of an hour, so find a time you can settle in or watch bits in bursts - but do watch it, it's a cracker. And get your proposal to speak at the next Respond in to us by 1 March.     Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.



" ["post_title"]=> string(77) "Video of the Week: Karen McGrane - Adaptive Content, Context, and Controversy" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(63) "video-week-karen-mcgrane-adaptive-content-context-controversy-2" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-02-24 10:08:24" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-23 23:08:24" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6891" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [13]=> object(WP_Post)#245 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6860) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-02-23 10:00:30" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-22 23:00:30" ["post_content"]=> string(10505) "Early Bird registration for our Transform conference has just been extended by a week to Friday 3 March. That's all the excuse we need give you some insight into our next featured speaker, Ariel Kennan, whose talk is titled “Making Public Services Effective and Accessible“. Ariel Kennan is Director, Design and Product at the Center for Economic Opportunity for the New York City Mayor’s Office. Her team is improving service delivery and advancing equity and opportunity for all New Yorkers through service design and building the best in class digital products. Her work includes service design, digital strategy and policy, mobile applications, websites, and media installations with a wide variety of cultural, corporate, and government partners. She is an alumna of Parsons School of Design and has held fellowships with Code for America and the Center for Urban Pedagogy. Ariel Kennan Ariel summarised how she arrived at her current position in a January 2017 interview with Doreen Lorenzo for FastCo Design:
"I first came to New York City to go to Parsons’ Integrated Design program, which was one of the first design school programs in the United States to embrace a multidisciplinary perspective. They knew that in order to solve the world’s hardest problems, designers needed to work with people from multiple disciplines. After college, I went on to work for ESI Design, where I had the opportunity to design a new city in China. From that point on, I knew I wanted to build and design things for cities. Because government controls a lot of what happens in cities, I knew I better understand how it all works. So I applied and was accepted to the Code for America fellowship program. Code for America helped me gain the vocabulary, knowledge, and expertise to have an informed conversation about what drives change in an urban context, along with the core design skills that I already had. So when I came home to New York City, Mayor de Blasio was just taking office. I had seen him speak previously and was so impressed. From there, I knew I wanted to serve my city."
Originally published: https://www.fastcodesign.com/3067006/designing-women/how-ariel-kennan-solves-nycs-most-intractable-design-problems Ariel gave an idea of the kind of projects she works on in an interview with Dave Seliger for Conscious magazine:
"I’ve been very fortunate to work on a lot of cool projects, everything from giant LED signs in Times Square to media installations in retail stores and museums. I even worked on a new city in China several years ago. But in the last couple years I’ve been working directly with local governments. When I was a fellow at Code for America, I worked with the mayors and their staff in Kansas City, KS and Kansas City, MO. I’m really proud of the technology we built over the course of the year to help the city better serve entrepreneurs, but most of all I’m proud of the larger community and government change that we helped create – not only through community organising, but helping the governments write policy and create new roles within the government itself. To me that was a much bigger, lasting impact than any single app could achieve."
Originally published: http://consciousmagazine.co/innovating-gotham-ariel-kennan/ Ariel Kennan In that same interview, Ariel showed her understanding of one aspect of government service delivery when she commented:
"Government is full of people who are incredibly well intentioned and who want to improve our cities. But sometimes I think public servants get held back by the larger systems of government, like procurement, human resources, and technology delivery. I’m really interested in how to bring new skills to public service, including design. What are the modern standards? How can we be more agile and nimble in the way that we work? And how can we be more informed by the people who actually use our products and services? By bringing these design values and skills to government, we can create more efficient and effective policies and services."
Originally published: http://consciousmagazine.co/innovating-gotham-ariel-kennan/ The FastCo interview showed Ariel also addresses the issues from the perspective of the citizen user of government services:
"Government is really good at organizing itself into specific issue areas, and thinking about which policies govern which pieces. But it’s not necessarily looking at the individual resident who has to touch five different agencies to have something change in their lives. My job is to ask the question, how do we bring better services across all of those points? We’ve been doing this in a few different ways. One has been using design as a service. We currently have a design team made up of public servants that are also full-time designers. They worked on the mayor’s new street homelessness initiative, HOME-STAT. But what we quickly realised was that stakeholders across the city didn’t understand the service from end-to-end, even if they understood their part of it. So we talked to everyone who touches the service including people who are actually on the street. We journey mapped the entire experience from end-to-end and brought different stakeholders together to co-create changes that they would like to see — from policy to communications to data to tech. We’re also working to build capacity and create tools not only for ourselves to do the design work but for others across the city to learn and have the tools to do it themselves. We’re developing a new design playbook for different services and departments within the city. We’re also creating a framework to be able to evaluate design interventions in the city and know if they’re effective. We want to know that we’re not just doing design for design’s sake."
Originally published: https://www.fastcodesign.com/3067006/designing-women/how-ariel-kennan-solves-nycs-most-intractable-design-problems Civic Design Camp In 2014, Ariel was one of the co-founders of the US East Coast branch of Civic Design Camp. There is a concise and well illustrated summary of the event, written by Carly Ayres for design site Core77 called "Civic Design Camp: Talks, Task Forces, Taboos and Tools for Large-Scale Impact":
"It's not often that an event brings government officials, public servants, visual and industrial designers together in the same room... but when it does, you can expect a truly forward-looking conversation. At least that's what organizers Dave Seliger and Ariel Kennan had in mind when they decided to bring Civic Design Camp to the East Coast: With the goal of creating "better citizen experiences" across the board, the 70 attendees spent last Saturday rethinking government programs and initiatives."
Read the full article at http://www.core77.com/posts/27886/Civic-Design-Camp-Talks-Task-Forces-Taboos-and-Tools-for-Large-Scale-Impact The video below shows Ariel's presentation to the annual Code For America conference in 2015. If you want to keep up with Ariel's work, you can find her here: angellist: https://angel.co/ariel-kennan facebook: https://www.facebook.com/arielkennan flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/arielmai/ foursquare: https://foursquare.com/user/59170799 github: https://github.com/arielkennan google+: https://plus.google.com/111347713481414198767 instagram: https://www.instagram.com/arielmainyc/ linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arielkennan medium: https://medium.com/@arielmai twitter: https://twitter.com/arielmai website: http://www.arielkennan.com/ If you want see Ariel in person, come along to Transform 17 in Canberra at the end of March. See you there." ["post_title"]=> string(43) "Transform 17 Speaker Insights: Ariel Kennan" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(42) "transform-17-speaker-insights-ariel-kennan" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-02-27 22:49:11" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-27 11:49:11" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6860" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [14]=> object(WP_Post)#1218 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6852) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-02-22 10:00:25" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-21 23:00:25" ["post_content"]=> string(2413) "Seb ChanVideo Ristretto is back in its mid-week slot, highlighting some of the shorter and sharper talks from our various conferences in video format, typically about 20 minutes long. This week, we bring you Seb Chan's talk from Direction 16, "Making things for people to do things with things we're preserving for them". Once you know that Seb's speciality is in working with museums, using great design and emerging technology to make them more relevant and popular than ever before, this title makes a lot of sense.    

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.
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Read on for all the details, or visit the Respond site. Way back in 2014, we launched Respond, a "popup" single day conference focusing on the challenges of what was, then still in its relative infancy, Responsive Web Design. In the years since, we've changed a lot about the event, and indeed all our events. Where once Web Directions was all about the main, end-of-year, multi-track Web Directions South - a big top under which we strove to bring all the family working on web-based apps and sites - we've moved on to a model of smaller, more focused events that we bring to multiple cities. As the conference formerly known as Web Directions morphed into Direction, and focused on the big picture at the intersection of Design, Technology and Strategy, Respond has grown from an event largely focused on implementation details for front end designers and developers in a multi form factor world, to encompass the whole range of front end design and user experience challenges. This year, we are genuinely excited to have brought together a program of extraordinary speakers, covering a broad range of topics of direct and ongoing relevance to your entire front end team. As always, and in keeping with our curatorial approach, a great deal of thought has gone into what we'll cover (and who should cover it). One key challenge in putting together programs is to find the "Goldilocks Zone" of content – not something the audience knows too well, and not something too far out across the horizon. Not chasing fads, yet not limited to the mundane. With that in mind, some of the key topics Respond will cover include * design languages and systems (including a keynote from the renowned Mina Markham, who developed the design language for the Hillary for America campaign, 'Pantsuit', and an intensive look at the work of the Westpac CX team and their Global Experience Language, and SEEK's use of design systems to help improve communication between design and development teams) * conversational and "chat" (or natural language) interfaces, with perspectives from Elizabeth Allen at Shopify, and local experts. Is there a "there" there? Is it hype, or reality? Let's find out * accessibility, with Cordelia McGee-Tubbs from Dropbox looking at how they make such a complex web application accessible, along with local accessibility hero Adem Cifcioglu * animation and motion design, with Rachel Nabors and locals showing the way toward an animated web * typefaces and typography, the way text is used in digital experiences, by the people who make them There's always room the underlying technologies of HTML, CSS and SVG, though as always, our approach is not about a laundry list of features, but rather the outcomes you can achieve using these technologies – including better typography, and more engaging experiences through animation. Overall, we've put together a program that addresses design issues we'll all be dealing with in the coming year, or years. These aren't just "hot topics", these are the challenges we're facing now and going forwards, and Respond has pulled together speakers who are showing the way forward in resolving them and advancing front end design. Respond really is for your whole front end team." 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Posts by

Announcing Respond 2017, our front end design conference

Round up your front end design team – your CX, UX and UI folks, your user researchers, along with your front end devs – UI engineers, web developers, whatever your team calls them – and get them along to not just the best front end design conference in Australia, but … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Fiona Chan – CSS: Code Smell Sanitation

Fiona ChanOur Video Ristretto this week features Fiona Chan, who many CSS loving Sydneysiders will know as one of the hosts of the CSS Sydney meetup, and our conference attendees will know as a regular volunteer at our events, helping to … Read more »

How to Convince the Boss You Should Go to Transform 17

We know that no matter how excited you are to attend Transform 17, it can be a terrifying task to ask your boss to pay for your ticket. You and I both know that attending this conference is a valuable investment to your professional and personal development … but … Read more »

Transform 16: User-centred Government Through Digital Services – Leisa Reichelt

From May 2013 to July 2015, Leisa Reichelt was Head of User Research for the Government Digital Service in the UK. That placed her in the middle – or perhaps at the forefront – of a revolution of sorts, a transformation of how British government offices and agencies make information … Read more »

The Most Connected Man on Earth

The future had arrived. It’s still not evenly distributed.
Braille reader

In conversation, I often bring up someone I refer to as “the most connected man in the world”, who I met over a decade ago and who is still the most connected person I’ve ever met, all … Read more »

Video of the Week – Jen Simmons at Respond 2016

At Respond last year, Jen Simmons gave a very well received session on the current state of CSS layout and the role of Real Art Direction on the Web. Today, much more of what Jen described is possible, thanks to CSS Grid, so this seems like a good … Read more »

Google’s Progressive Web App Roadshow is Coming to Sydney

Since Alex Russell, who coined the term Progressive Web App and outlined the concept, first spoke publicly about them at our Code 2015 conference (watch the video below), this approach to developing powerful, engaging web applications has become extremely popular, and has been adopted by some really significant brands, as well … Read more »

Transform 16 Masterclass: Deconstructing Delight with Jared Spool & Dana Chisnell

With the Early Bird prices for Transform 17 closing tomorrow (Fri 3/3), it’s a good time to remind you that the event is more than just a day of talks. Our Masterclass this year is divided into two workshops, and should be a full-on day with two experts. … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Simon Knox – Incremental responsive redesign at Kogan.com

Simon KnoxThis week’s Video Ristretto comes from last year’s Respond conference (you do know there’s currently a Call For Proposals for Respond 17, right?) in the form of Simon Knox and his talk about the Incremental responsive redesign at … Read more »

Transform 17 Speaker Insights – Dan Sheldon

Our Transform conference in Canberra is just over a month away (early bird closes Friday 3 March), and we want to share some insights into Dan Sheldon, who is doing double time as workshop presenter and conference speaker. 

Dan’s presentation at Transform is titled The Government IT Self-Harm Playbook. This … Read more »

Transform 16: Common Ground, A Content Case Study – Mel Flanagan

So, we’ve extended the Early Bird discount period for Transform 2017 in Canberra (29-30 March) by one week to this Friday, 3 March. In the meantime, here’s another Wrap summary from last year’s Transform, this one a look at a partnership between government and a commercial agency.

Common Ground, … Read more »

Weekend Reading Links

Every other week, I recommend some links to articles and online resources I think you might enjoy reading over the weekend.

Pixar in a Box
Regular readers will know of my love of (perhaps obsession with) animation, particularly the animation of Pixar. In conjunction with Khan Academy, Pixar has just released “… Read more »

Video of the Week: Karen McGrane – Adaptive Content, Context, and Controversy

Video of the Week is back for 2017. These are videos of full length conference presentations, typically 45 minutes to an hour long, often keynotes and always fascinating.

I can’t think of a better option for the first Video of the Week for 2017 than Karen McGrane with her closing keynote … Read more »

Transform 17 Speaker Insights: Ariel Kennan

Early Bird registration for our Transform conference has just been extended by a week to Friday 3 March. That’s all the excuse we need give you some insight into our next featured speaker, Ariel Kennan, whose talk is titled “Making Public Services Effective and Accessible“.

Ariel Kennan is … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Seb Chan, CXO, Australian Centre for the Moving Image

Seb ChanVideo Ristretto is back in its mid-week slot, highlighting some of the shorter and sharper talks from our various conferences in video format, typically about 20 minutes long.

This week, we bring you Seb Chan’s talk from Direction 16, “Making things … Read more »