object(WP_Query)#647 (51) { ["query"]=> array(1) { ["author_name"]=> string(5) "ricky" } ["query_vars"]=> array(64) { ["author_name"]=> string(5) "ricky" ["error"]=> string(0) "" ["m"]=> string(0) "" ["p"]=> int(0) ["post_parent"]=> string(0) "" ["subpost"]=> string(0) "" ["subpost_id"]=> string(0) "" ["attachment"]=> string(0) "" ["attachment_id"]=> int(0) ["name"]=> string(0) "" ["static"]=> string(0) "" ["pagename"]=> string(0) "" ["page_id"]=> int(0) ["second"]=> string(0) "" ["minute"]=> string(0) "" ["hour"]=> string(0) "" ["day"]=> int(0) ["monthnum"]=> int(0) ["year"]=> int(0) ["w"]=> int(0) ["category_name"]=> string(0) "" ["tag"]=> string(0) "" ["cat"]=> string(0) "" ["tag_id"]=> string(0) "" ["author"]=> int(18) ["feed"]=> string(0) "" ["tb"]=> string(0) "" ["paged"]=> int(0) ["meta_key"]=> string(0) "" ["meta_value"]=> string(0) "" ["preview"]=> string(0) "" ["s"]=> string(0) "" ["sentence"]=> string(0) "" ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["fields"]=> string(0) "" ["menu_order"]=> string(0) "" ["embed"]=> string(0) "" ["category__in"]=> array(0) { } ["category__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["category__and"]=> array(0) { } ["post__in"]=> array(0) { } ["post__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["post_name__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag__and"]=> array(0) { } ["tag_slug__in"]=> array(0) { } ["tag_slug__and"]=> array(0) { } ["post_parent__in"]=> array(0) { } ["post_parent__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["author__in"]=> array(0) { } ["author__not_in"]=> array(0) { } ["ignore_sticky_posts"]=> bool(false) ["suppress_filters"]=> bool(false) ["cache_results"]=> bool(true) ["update_post_term_cache"]=> bool(true) ["lazy_load_term_meta"]=> bool(true) ["update_post_meta_cache"]=> bool(true) ["post_type"]=> string(0) "" ["posts_per_page"]=> int(15) ["nopaging"]=> bool(false) ["comments_per_page"]=> string(2) "50" ["no_found_rows"]=> bool(false) ["order"]=> string(4) "DESC" } ["tax_query"]=> object(WP_Tax_Query)#274 (6) { ["queries"]=> array(0) { } ["relation"]=> string(3) "AND" ["table_aliases":protected]=> array(0) { } ["queried_terms"]=> array(0) { } ["primary_table"]=> string(8) "wp_posts" ["primary_id_column"]=> string(2) "ID" } ["meta_query"]=> object(WP_Meta_Query)#275 (9) { ["queries"]=> array(0) { } ["relation"]=> NULL ["meta_table"]=> NULL ["meta_id_column"]=> NULL ["primary_table"]=> NULL ["primary_id_column"]=> NULL ["table_aliases":protected]=> array(0) { } ["clauses":protected]=> array(0) { } ["has_or_relation":protected]=> bool(false) } ["date_query"]=> bool(false) ["queried_object"]=> object(WP_User)#1097 (7) { ["data"]=> object(stdClass)#1096 (10) { ["ID"]=> string(2) "18" ["user_login"]=> string(5) "ricky" ["user_pass"]=> string(34) "$P$B3YXg1kxvpxKLRMce3huZTUvk7MA/m." ["user_nicename"]=> string(5) "ricky" ["user_email"]=> string(16) "ricky@onsman.com" ["user_url"]=> string(17) "http://onsman.com" ["user_registered"]=> string(19) "2015-11-26 02:17:41" ["user_activation_key"]=> string(0) "" ["user_status"]=> string(1) "0" ["display_name"]=> string(12) "Ricky Onsman" } ["ID"]=> int(18) ["caps"]=> array(1) { ["administrator"]=> bool(true) } ["cap_key"]=> string(15) "wp_capabilities" ["roles"]=> array(1) { [0]=> string(13) "administrator" } ["allcaps"]=> array(82) { ["switch_themes"]=> bool(true) ["edit_themes"]=> bool(true) ["activate_plugins"]=> bool(true) ["edit_plugins"]=> bool(true) ["edit_users"]=> bool(true) ["edit_files"]=> bool(true) ["manage_options"]=> bool(true) ["moderate_comments"]=> bool(true) ["manage_categories"]=> bool(true) ["manage_links"]=> bool(true) ["upload_files"]=> bool(true) ["import"]=> bool(true) ["unfiltered_html"]=> bool(true) ["edit_posts"]=> bool(true) ["edit_others_posts"]=> bool(true) ["edit_published_posts"]=> bool(true) ["publish_posts"]=> bool(true) ["edit_pages"]=> bool(true) ["read"]=> bool(true) ["level_10"]=> bool(true) ["level_9"]=> bool(true) ["level_8"]=> bool(true) ["level_7"]=> bool(true) ["level_6"]=> bool(true) ["level_5"]=> bool(true) ["level_4"]=> bool(true) ["level_3"]=> bool(true) ["level_2"]=> bool(true) ["level_1"]=> bool(true) ["level_0"]=> bool(true) ["edit_others_pages"]=> bool(true) ["edit_published_pages"]=> bool(true) ["publish_pages"]=> bool(true) ["delete_pages"]=> bool(true) ["delete_others_pages"]=> bool(true) ["delete_published_pages"]=> bool(true) ["delete_posts"]=> bool(true) ["delete_others_posts"]=> bool(true) ["delete_published_posts"]=> bool(true) ["delete_private_posts"]=> bool(true) ["edit_private_posts"]=> bool(true) ["read_private_posts"]=> bool(true) ["delete_private_pages"]=> bool(true) ["edit_private_pages"]=> bool(true) ["read_private_pages"]=> bool(true) ["delete_users"]=> bool(true) ["create_users"]=> bool(true) ["unfiltered_upload"]=> bool(true) ["manage_cforms"]=> bool(true) ["track_cforms"]=> bool(true) ["simple_tags"]=> bool(true) ["edit_dashboard"]=> bool(true) ["admin_simple_tags"]=> bool(true) ["update_plugins"]=> bool(true) ["delete_plugins"]=> bool(true) ["install_plugins"]=> bool(true) ["update_themes"]=> bool(true) ["install_themes"]=> bool(true) ["update_core"]=> bool(true) ["list_users"]=> bool(true) ["remove_users"]=> bool(true) ["promote_users"]=> bool(true) ["edit_theme_options"]=> bool(true) ["delete_themes"]=> bool(true) ["export"]=> bool(true) ["wpseo_bulk_edit"]=> bool(true) ["read_nc_reference"]=> bool(true) ["read_private_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["edit_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["edit_nc_reference"]=> bool(true) ["edit_published_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["edit_others_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["publish_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["edit_private_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["edit_others_nc_reference"]=> bool(true) ["create_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["delete_nc_reference"]=> bool(true) ["delete_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["delete_others_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["delete_private_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["delete_published_nc_references"]=> bool(true) ["administrator"]=> bool(true) } ["filter"]=> NULL } ["queried_object_id"]=> int(18) ["request"]=> string(214) "SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND (wp_posts.post_author = 18) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish') ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 15" ["posts"]=> &array(10) { [0]=> object(WP_Post)#236 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6661) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 12:18:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 01:18:20" ["post_content"]=> string(2781) "Erin MooreWhen Erin Moore gave her talk at Web Directions in 2014, she was Senior UX Designer at Twitter. She has since moved on, but many of the insights she delivered came from her work with the social media giant. Her topic was time, that concept that measures our personal lives, dominates our working lives and seems sometimes to enslave us. It's not a particularly technical talk, but cuts to the heart of how we do what we do, why we do it, and - inevitably - how we could manage our time better. As such, it's a great lead-up to next week's Direction 16 conference.

 

directionad

 

Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(51) "Video of the Week: Erin Moore - Convenient Fictions" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "video-week-erin-moore-convenient-fictions" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 12:18:20" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 01:18:20" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6661" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#237 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6652) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-03 14:46:51" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-03 03:46:51" ["post_content"]=> string(5600) "Scroll MagazineHere is the third and final set of extracts from the interviews we conducted with Direction 16 speakers for Scroll Magazine. These are only snippets - to see the full answers, come to Direction 16, where all conference and workshop attendees get a free print edition (88 bound pages of articles and interviews with full colour photos and illustrations). Scroll will also be available for digital download post-conference. Today's question: Do you see yourself as more of an artist or a scientist? Mark Pesce (Inventor, VRML): I see myself as a problem-solver. Having an engineer’s education and temperament, I do occasionally get an eye to creating an artistic work, and then approach it with a bizarre mixture of pragmatism and intuition. Caroline Sinders (Machine Learning Designer, Buzzfeed): I guess I’m much more of a scientist now, but it’s really hard me to shake the fact that I started my career off in art, and I tend to approach everything as a photojournalist, as a photographer. Pasquale D'Silva (Product Designer, Hype): 99% Artist, 1% other. Computers have always been a means to an end. The less I’m aware of the fact that I’m using technology, the deeper the flow state I can get into. Jacob Bijani (Product Designer/Engineer, Tumblr): Of the two, definitely more of a scientist. I did go to art school, but I've always enjoyed the technical side of making things more. I really enjoy seeing something I've built come together and take life. Jenn Bane (Community Director, Cards agains Humanity): Hmm... neither. I’m not an artist, I’m not a scientist. I do think of myself as a writer now. It’s part of my identity and my brain is wired for storytelling. Jonathan Shariat (Product Designer): You must be a scientist in your approach to understand problems, possible solutions, and your users’ needs. You also need to be an artist by putting a little of yourself into your work and making it pleasing to use. Anna Pickard (Editorial Director, Slack): Artist, I guess, if I have to pick between the two. But artist more in the sense of craftsperson - I write as if I’m putting something together with my hands, moulding it, hacking things off, adding things on, making whatever it is function the way I want it to function. Matt Griffin (Film Maker & Designer): I see myself as a craftsperson. Which has elements of both, I suppose. Art is largely for expression of the self, design is for solving problems. Aubrey Blanche (Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, Atlassian): I definitely see myself as more of a scientist. I'm always joking that I'm a 'recovering academic', but anyone on my team can tell you it's true. Andy Clarke (Designer & Art Director): For me, working on the web isn’t about problem solving, as it is for many people. My fascination is with how we can use the web as a creative medium to tell a story, communicate an idea or maybe sell a product. That’s something that the fine artist in me still loves to do for our clients. Josh Clark (IxD, Big Medium): It’d have to be science. I’m a systems guy. I like to figure out what makes things tick, what makes people tick. I’ve always been excited about studying and creating systems that help to empower and enable, to amplify what folks can do.   directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(36) "One Question, Many Answers: Part III" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(34) "one-question-many-answers-part-iii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-03 14:49:17" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-03 03:49:17" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6652" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#238 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6645) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-02 12:31:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-02 01:31:26" ["post_content"]=> string(2663) "Ben BuchananOur video ristretto this week comes to us from one of those people who hooked up with us from even before our Web Directions days, and has been a key supporter even as his own career has blossomed. He's now Front End Lead at Ansarada, and at Code he gave a great talk about the importance of versioning. Take a look and then, if you haven't already, come on over and register for Direction 16.

 

directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(51) "Video Ristretto: Ben Buchanan - The SemVer Talk 1.0" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(44) "video-ristretto-ben-buchanan-semver-talk-1-0" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-02 12:32:08" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-02 01:32:08" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6645" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#239 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6640) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-01 10:31:23" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-31 23:31:23" ["post_content"]=> string(4411) "One of the benefits of organising events like Code, Respond, Transform and - in just over a week - Direction is the events that other people organise around the conference that add value and depth to their whole experience. SilverStripe is a major sponsor of Web Directions and has supported our events for the past six years. This year, they’re running a community conference alongside Direction 16, the inaugural StripeCon APAC. The best news is Direction ticket holders can attend this event for FREE. Come along to learn:
  • * How digital transformation and open source go hand in hand
  • * Pragmatic insights into successful digital transformation projects
  • * What the future holds for large-scale digital projects
Among the highlights, you'll hear from Bene Anderson, Service Delivery Manager, All-of-govt online products & Paul Murray, All-of-govt ICT Capability Manager, NZ Department of Internal Affairs on Overcoming common challenges facing public sector digital projects. Paul and Bene manage services that support New Zealand Government organisations to deliver better online experiences. Their presentation will focus on challenges that Government organisations face, and how the Common Web Platform and Open Source are making it easier to meet those challenges. Colin Westacott, Director of Strategic Partnerships for Ephox Cognitive will profile this advanced new editing environment that combines the power of the world's most advanced editor with the power of cognitive computing. Ephox Cognitive will significantly help content creators and authors to easily build complete, accurate and current content by presenting them in real time with relevant and in context content that already exists either from internal or external sources - textual or rich media. Users will have automatic access to a huge store of content and be able to copy, reference or drag and drop video into their new content really easily. In other sessions, you'll also hear from folks at Little Giant, Wolf Interactive, Internetrix and, of course, SilverStripe on digital transformation, multi-region synchronisation, the UX and UI of multi-site setups, and user engagement beyond direct interaction. There will also be a hugely relevant workshop run by Sanicki Lawyers, called Legal issues for Creative Businesses in the Digital Age.  It provides an introduction to legal issues for those working in new media, design and technology, game development, graphic and web designers and web-based startups. It touches on issues concerning copyright ownership, the use of authoring programs, and the need for those in the creative space to have appropriate contracts in place with employees, independent contractors or unpaid volunteers. It also provides a basic introduction to protecting intellectual property including branding and brand protection, Trade Marks, the use of music, terms of trade agreements, privacy issues, end-user licencing and business structures. (NB Sanicki Lawyers, a law firm specialising in the creative industries, is offering free 15 minute, 1-on-1 legal advice sessions for conference delegates for the duration of Direction 16 to answer any business or legal queries you may have. To arrange your free consultation, contact Darren at darren@sanickilawyers.com.au or 0412 723 725.) It will be an amazing day, without a doubt, and a great intro to the Direction 16 conference. StripeCon APAC Details When: Wed 9 November 2016 Where: Australian Technology Park, Sydney Who should attend: digital leaders and developers. In the evening, join us for the official kickoff of Direction 16 at the Australian movie premiere of “What comes next is the Future”, sponsored by StripeCon APAC. Tickets are free for Web Directions ticket holders by using the code direction16. Register for StripeCon APAC now." ["post_title"]=> string(42) "Direction 16 Partner Event: StripeCon APAC" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "direction-16-partner-event-stripecon-apac" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-01 10:31:23" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-31 23:31:23" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6640" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#240 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6636) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-28 08:15:45" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-27 21:15:45" ["post_content"]=> string(2489) "Cap WatkinsOur long form Video of the Week this week is of Cap Watkins delivering his Web Directions 15 keynote, "Design Everything". This is really appropriate in light of our upcoming Direction 16 conference, where these kinds of ideas, philosophies and their practical application all come to the fore. Cap is a wonderfully engaging speaker, and some of the points he makes might sneak up on you. And then, you might feel inspired to sign up for Direction 16 - it's going to be an amazing few days. Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(50) "Video of the Week: Cap Watkins - Design Everything" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "video-week-cap-watkins-design-everything" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-28 08:15:45" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-27 21:15:45" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6636" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#241 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6632) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-26 12:04:34" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-26 01:04:34" ["post_content"]=> string(2780) "Simon SwainThis week's video ristretto come from just a few months ago at our Code conference in Sydney and Melbourne. If you've seen any of Simon Swain's presentations at our events, you'll know he comes up with some pretty breathtaking stuff. Rats of the Maze is no different - although it may be different to anything you've seen before. As you watch, remember this is all running live in the browser. Can anything at Direction 16 top that? Well, yes. Probably. See for yourself!. Come and join us as we bring the future to the present. directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(47) "Video Ristretto: Simon Swain - Rats of the Maze" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "video-ristretto-simon-swain-rats-maze" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-26 12:05:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-26 01:05:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6632" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#242 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6629) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-25 10:59:08" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 23:59:08" ["post_content"]=> string(6582) "Time for the second in our series of extracts from the interviews we conducted with Direction 16 speakers for Scroll Magazine. All conference and workshop attendees get a free print edition (88 bound pages of articles and interviews with full colour photos and illustrations) while it will also be available for digital download post-conference. Today's question: What is something "forgotten" you'd like to see make a comeback? Mark Pesce (Inventor, VRML): Mindfulness. Caroline Sinders (Machine Learning Designer, Buzzfeed): Probably the usage of buses. I know that sounds strange, but let me explain. There’s all this talk right now of self-driving cares and how they’re going to revolutionise the way we travel, and I kind of wish we would create better bus systems. Self-driving cars allow only for one to four people to fit within them, but buses can allow for many more. It would be great bring that back and focus on that more. Pasquale D'Silva (Product Designer, Hype): Classical animation, back in the theaters. Disney / Pixar has been steering the community into some wonderful pockets of storytelling, and visual development… but it’s becoming much of the same. 2d takes just as long as computer generated films to produce today. You can do things in 2d, that you could never do in 3d. You have an opportunity to defy physics, simulation and geometry. I think this reasoning has been forgotten, and it’s a shame. Jacob Bijani (Product Designer/Engineer, Tumblr): RSS feeds. Really, the whole idea of an open web. Being able to make an "API mashup" that cobbled together some features you wanted was pretty awesome. I think it inspired a lot of great ideas. Now everything is so closed and protected, and with how iOS is built it's basically impossible to customize apps like you could with browser extensions. Jenn Bane (Community Director, Cards agains Humanity): All the drive-in theaters in my area are closed – do those still exist at all? I want to go to a drive-in, let’s bring those back. Watching a movie outside sounds so peaceful. Or maybe it’s terrible. I genuinely don’t know and want to try it! Jonathan Shariat (Product Designer): The Flash intro. Ha ha. But seriously, I miss some of the real creative experiences during the time Flash was around. Some were quirky, others were sublime or beautiful, I loved the diversity of it all. Today, we see less diversity in the experiences on the web. I hope we can start seeing people take more risks and create some real memorable experiences. Anna Pickard (Editorial Director, Slack): People being themselves on the internet. OK - well, that’s unfair. The world is full of people being themselves on the internet. But I do miss an unfiltered, more open (and in many ways more vulnerable) internet, an internet where people were unafraid of presenting themselves honestly and openly. Matt Griffin (Film Maker & Designer): Inline styles. Just kidding, they’re already making a comeback. Batten down the hatches, friends. Aubrey Blanche (Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, Atlassian): I'd be down with "please" and "thank you." As we rely more on machines to do things for us, we've lost the value of politeness to a certain extent. I'd love a world in which the Amazon Alexa I have at home would refuse to turn on my TV unless I asked politely. Not necessarily because it's crucial for me to be nice to my appliances, but because everything we do is constantly re-wiring our brain into new habits. Andy Clarke (Designer & Art Director): Recently I’ve developed an obsession for boutique publishing, in particular independent magazines such as Elliot Jay Stocks’ ‘Lagom.’ Somehow the variety of magazine layouts combined with the feel of a printed magazine makes the format incredibly satisfying. While we focus on making compelling digital products and websites, we mustn’t forget that print can be equally compelling. I’d love to see more digital creatives make printed work. Josh Clark (IxD, Big Medium): Wow, the beaming feature of the Palm Pilot. Remember that? If you wanted to share contact info or set up a meeting with someone right next to you, you just pointed your Palm Pilots at each other, and it was done. That’s so hard to do now! We fumble with our phones, scramble with apps, and then finally just email or text the other person. We’re clumsy now, but the Palm was elegant: just point, beam, done.   directionad

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(35) "One Question, Many Answers: Part II" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(33) "one-question-many-answers-part-ii" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-25 10:59:08" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 23:59:08" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6629" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#243 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6626) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 13:16:57" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 02:16:57" ["post_content"]=> string(7819) "Those of you who have seen the Scroll Magazine we produced for our Code 16 conference (and if you haven't, you should) will have noticed that we published a list of all our speakers and their topics at previous Code conferences. That resulted in a list of 80+ presentations and a bit of a who's who of web coding, programming, engineering over the preceding five years. We've reproduced the list below. Now, when it came to Direction 16, we had to decide how we would handle this idea, if at all. Long story short, we decided we would do it, so the Direction 16 edition of Scroll has a pretty amazing list of over 300 presentations from 2006 to 2015, but this time sorted in alphabetical order of speaker name so it's easy to see who has addressed the conference more than once. As a point of curiosity, there's just one speaker who has given five talks at Web Directions during that period. Care to guess? In any case, have a browse of our previous Code speakers below and make sure you get a copy of the Direction 16 edition of Scroll - all conference and workshop attendees receive a free print edition (88 bound pages of articles and interviews with full colour photos and illustrations) while it will also be available for digital download post-conference.   Speaker Name (Year) Topic Alex Russell (2015) What comes next for the Web Platform? Rachel Nabors (2015) State of the Animation Alex Sexton (2015) Current best practice in front end ops Clark Pan (2015) ES6 Symbols, what they are and how to use them Ben Teese (2015) A Deep-Dive into ES6 Promises James Hunter (2015) Async and await Alex Mackey (2015) JavaScript numbers Andy Sharman (2015) Classing up ES6 Jess Telford (2015) Scope Chains & Closures Kassandra Perch (2015) Stop the Fanaticism - using the right tools for the job Mark Nottingham (2015) What does HTTP/2 mean for Front End Engineers? Mark Dalgleish (2015) Dawn of the Progressive Single Page App Elijah Manor (2015) Eliminate JavaScript Code Smells Domenic Denicola (2015) Async Frontiers in JavaScript Chris Roberts (2015) Getting offline with the Service Worker Simon Knox (2015) Crossing the Streams Jonathon Creenaune (2015) Back to the future with Web Components Rhiana Heath (2015) Pop-up Accessibility Warwick Cox (2015) Console dot Simon Swain (2015) Canvas Cold War Raquel Vélez (2014) You can do what with math now? Alex Feyerke (2014) Offline First: faster, more robust and more fun (web) pages Ryan Seddon (2014) Web Components: the future of web dev Rod Vagg (2014) Embrace the asynchronous Fiona Chan (2014) The declarative power of CSS selectors Ben Birch (2014) When all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail Ben Schwarz (2014) CSS Variables Mark Dalgleish (2014) Taking JavaScript out of context Rob Manson (2014) The Augmented Web is now a reality Damon Oehlman (2014) Streaming the Web (it’s not what you think) Barbara Bermes (2014) A publisher’s take on controlling 3rd party scripts Paul Theriault (2014) Taking front-end security seriously Jared Wyles (2014) On readable code Mark Nottingham (2014) What’s happening in TLS (transport layer security)? Andrew Fisher (2014) A Device API Safari Alex Mackey (2014) Harden up for ajax! Allen Wirfs-Brock (2014) ECMAScript 6: A Better JavaScript for the Ambient Web Era Tantek Çelik (2014) The once and future IndieWeb Dmitry Baranovskiy (2014) You Don’t Know SVG Angus Croll (2013) The politics of JavaScript Jeremy Ashkenas (2013) Taking JavaScript seriously with backbone.js Alex Danilo (2013) Create impact with CSS Filters Julio Cesar Ody (2013) What’s ECMAScript 6 good for? Glen Maddern (2013) JavaScript’s slightly stricter mode Nicole Sullivan (2013) The Top 5 performance shenanigans of CSS preprocessors Tony Milne (2013) Making and keeping promises in JavaScript Cameron McCormack (2013) File > Open: An introduction to the File API Silvia Pfeiffer (2013) HTML5 multi-party video conferencing Elle Meredith (2013) Source Maps for Debugging Jared Wyles (2013) See the tries for the trees Garann Means (2013) HTML, CSS and the Client-Side App Michael Mahemoff (2013) What every web developer should know about REST Mark Nottingham (2013) HTTP/2.0: WTF? Ryan Seddon (2013) Ghost in the Shadow DOM Troy Hunt (2013) Essential security practices for protecting your modern web services Marc Fasel (2013) Put on your asynchronous hat and node Alex Mackey (2013) Typescript and terminators Aaron Powell (2013) IndexedDB, A database in our browser Andrew Fisher (2013) The wonderful-amazing-orientation-motion-sensormatic machine Chris Ward (2013) Test, tweak and debug your mobile web apps with ease Steven Wittens (2013) Making things with maths Faruk Ates (2012) The Web’s Third Decade Divya Manian (2012) Designing in the browser John Allsopp (2012) Getting off(line): appcache, localStorage and more for faster apps that work offline Dave Johnson (2012) Device APIs-closing the gap between native and web Damon Oehlman (2012) HTML5 Messaging Silvia Pfeiffer (2012) Implementing Video Conferencing in HTML5 Max Wheeler (2012) Drag and Drop and give me twenty Anson Parker (2012) The HTML5 History API: PushState or bust! Tammy Butow (2012) Fantastic forms for mobile web Andrew Fisher (2012) Getting all touchy feely with the mobile web Rob Hawkes (2012) HTML5 technologies and game development Jed Schmidt (2012) NPM: Node’s Personal Manservant Dmitry Baranovskiy (2012) JavaScript: enter the dragon Anette Bergo (2012) Truthiness, falsiness and other JavaScript gotchas Ryan Seddon (2012) Debugging secrets for the lazy developer Jared Wyles (2012) Removing the dad from your browser Mark Dalgleish (2012) Getting Closure Tony Milne (2012) Party like it’s 1999, write JavaScript like it’s (2012)! Tim Oxley (2012) Clientside templates for reactive UI Damon Oehlman (2012) The mainevent: Beyond event listeners Dave Johnson (2012) Building Native Mobile Apps with PhoneGap and HTML5" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "Idea of the Week: Web Directions Alumni" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(31) "idea-week-web-directions-alumni" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 13:16:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-24 02:16:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6626" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#244 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6618) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-10-21 10:30:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-20 23:30:18" ["post_content"]=> string(2588) "Since this is in my hands this week while John Allsopp takes a bit of family time, I'm taking the opportunity to "rescreen" a talk of John's from Web Directions 2012. Not only is everything he talks about still relevant, it relates directly to what Direction 16 is about. Now with that in your mind, take a look at the schedule for Direction 16, then register and come and join us for what will be an extraordinary couple of days. John Allsopp Direction 16

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(79) "Video of the Week: John Allsopp - What We Talk About When We Talk About The Web" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(37) "video-week-john-allsopp-talk-talk-web" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-10-20 23:32:06" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-10-20 12:32:06" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6618" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#1081 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6309) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-03-30 15:04:48" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-03-30 05:04:48" ["post_content"]=> string(4988) "In the leadup to our Responsive Web Design focussed event, Respond, in Sydney and Melbourne in April 2016, and as part of a special new project we'll be announcing at the conference, we've been speaking with some of our speakers, and getting to know them a little better. This week, Ethan Marcotte, our opening keynote speaker. Places are still available, so don't miss this very rare chance to see Ethan, and a dozen other amazing speakers in Sydney and Melbourne. ethan Q Describe your family. I'm in my late thirties, and I'm the oldest of five children. My family's from Northern Vermont, a fairly rural corner of the United States. I’m married to an incredible person who works for a large software company, but who has more interests than I can keep track of – knitting, writing, reading, cooking, and running– and generally keeps me inspired. No family to speak of, save for our impossibly surly murdercat. Q What book has changed your life in some way? A Stewart Brand’s How Buildings Learn was once described to me as “a book that has nothing to do with web design, yet has everything to do with web design.” And I think that’s true. (What’s more, it’s just a lovely read.) Q What formal qualifications do you have? How did you end up doing web work? A I studied English literature in college, and spent most of my last undergraduate year writing a stultifyingly dull essay about Milton’s use of allegory in three of his major poems. (I wrote that sentence and I fell asleep halfway through: my apologies.) I nearly cobbled together enough credits for a dual major in music, but figured I was unemployable enough with my literature degree, so. I kid! But: I got into web design almost as a lark, getting my hands on a copy of Photoshop at college. From there, I eventually stumbled into learning HTML by view source, and started copying/pasting my way through my first tiny web projects. When it came time to leave school, I was feeling a bit burned out on my studies, and didn’t exactly relish the idea of committing to advanced degrees. An advisor suggested I find another job for a year or two –“put the books away until you miss them,” she said–so I decided to try my hand at working as a web designer. So I suppose I’m more than a decade into “taking some time off before graduate school.” Q Describe what you do. What’s your job? Is presenting at web conferences part of that job? A I’m an independent designer, based just outside of Boston, Massachusetts. I coined the term responsive design a few years ago, which has really shaped my practice of late: I’m asked to speak about the topic at conferences, work on responsive redesigns, and consult with clients on their responsive projects. I also co-host a podcast with Karen McGrane about responsive redesigns, and we also offer workshops to help companies prepare for the ways responsive might change their organization. Oh, and sometimes I write books, too. Q Do you give much thought to the title you apply to yourself? Does it matter? A I don’t think I’ve ever had a title that fits what I do. Titles are, I think, primarily for the people you work with (or for). Which doesn’t mean they’re not valuable! But at least for me, they’re rarely a part of the conversation with clients. Q Describe the first time you gave a presentation on a web topic. A The very first talk I gave was for a small gathering of designers and developers at Harvard, where I was working at the time. I was terrified! Also, I’m pretty sure most of my talk was incoherent, if not plain wrong. Q In The Graduate, Mr McGuire has just one word to say to aimless college graduate Benjamin Braddock: “Plastics”. What one word would you give to today’s prospective web professional? A Empathy. The word’s probably in danger of being overused, but it’s one of the more useful parts of my design practice. At every turn of a design process, I try to remind myself to consider how a website should change if, say, someone’s using older hardware, or if they’re on a slower connection. We web designers and developers need to step out of their own contexts, biases, and assumptions, and empathy’s one of the best ways to design universal, inclusive experiences for a properly World Wide Web." ["post_title"]=> string(54) "Respond Speaker Insight: The inimitable Ethan Marcotte" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(49) "respond-speaker-insight-inimitable-ethan-marcotte" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-03-31 23:27:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-03-31 13:27:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6309" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } } ["post_count"]=> int(10) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#236 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6661) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "18" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 12:18:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 01:18:20" ["post_content"]=> string(2781) "Erin MooreWhen Erin Moore gave her talk at Web Directions in 2014, she was Senior UX Designer at Twitter. She has since moved on, but many of the insights she delivered came from her work with the social media giant. Her topic was time, that concept that measures our personal lives, dominates our working lives and seems sometimes to enslave us. It's not a particularly technical talk, but cuts to the heart of how we do what we do, why we do it, and - inevitably - how we could manage our time better. As such, it's a great lead-up to next week's Direction 16 conference.

 

directionad

 

Like to watch and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once a week mailing list where we round up the week's best reading and watching on all things Web. And you'll get a complimentary digital copy of our brand new magazine, Scroll.
" ["post_title"]=> string(51) "Video of the Week: Erin Moore - Convenient Fictions" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "video-week-erin-moore-convenient-fictions" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 12:18:20" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-11-04 01:18:20" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6661" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(2) "10" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(1) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(true) ["is_category"]=> bool(false) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "c2a6c9c233203a4fc1fab74bcbc54c6f" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } }

Posts by

Video of the Week: Erin Moore – Convenient Fictions

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • November 4, 2016
  • Comments Off on Video of the Week: Erin Moore – Convenient Fictions

Erin MooreWhen Erin Moore gave her talk at Web Directions in 2014, she was Senior UX Designer at Twitter. She has since moved on, but many of the insights she delivered came from her work with the social media giant. Her … Read more »

One Question, Many Answers: Part III

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • November 3, 2016
  • Comments Off on One Question, Many Answers: Part III

Scroll MagazineHere is the third and final set of extracts from the interviews we conducted with Direction 16 speakers for Scroll Magazine. These are only snippets – to see the full answers, come to Direction 16, where all conference and … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Ben Buchanan – The SemVer Talk 1.0

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • November 2, 2016
  • Comments Off on Video Ristretto: Ben Buchanan – The SemVer Talk 1.0

Ben BuchananOur video ristretto this week comes to us from one of those people who hooked up with us from even before our Web Directions days, and has been a key supporter even as his own career has blossomed. He’s now … Read more »

Direction 16 Partner Event: StripeCon APAC

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • November 1, 2016
  • Comments Off on Direction 16 Partner Event: StripeCon APAC

One of the benefits of organising events like Code, Respond, Transform and – in just over a week – Direction is the events that other people organise around the conference that add value and depth to their whole experience.

SilverStripe is a major sponsor of Web Directions and has supported our … Read more »

Video of the Week: Cap Watkins – Design Everything

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • October 28, 2016
  • Comments Off on Video of the Week: Cap Watkins – Design Everything

Cap WatkinsOur long form Video of the Week this week is of Cap Watkins delivering his Web Directions 15 keynote, “Design Everything”. This is really appropriate in light of our upcoming Direction 16 conference, where these kinds of ideas, philosophies and … Read more »

Video Ristretto: Simon Swain – Rats of the Maze

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • October 26, 2016
  • Comments Off on Video Ristretto: Simon Swain – Rats of the Maze

Simon SwainThis week’s video ristretto come from just a few months ago at our Code conference in Sydney and Melbourne. If you’ve seen any of Simon Swain’s presentations at our events, you’ll know he comes up with some pretty breathtaking … Read more »

One Question, Many Answers: Part II

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • October 25, 2016
  • Comments Off on One Question, Many Answers: Part II

Time for the second in our series of extracts from the interviews we conducted with Direction 16 speakers for Scroll Magazine. All conference and workshop attendees get a free print edition (88 bound pages of articles and interviews with full colour photos and illustrations) while it will also be … Read more »

Idea of the Week: Web Directions Alumni

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • October 24, 2016
  • Comments Off on Idea of the Week: Web Directions Alumni

Those of you who have seen the Scroll Magazine we produced for our Code 16 conference (and if you haven’t, you should) will have noticed that we published a list of all our speakers and their topics at previous Code conferences.

That resulted in a list of 80+ presentations … Read more »

Video of the Week: John Allsopp – What We Talk About When We Talk About The Web

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • October 21, 2016
  • Comments Off on Video of the Week: John Allsopp – What We Talk About When We Talk About The Web

Since this is in my hands this week while John Allsopp takes a bit of family time, I’m taking the opportunity to “rescreen” a talk of John’s from Web Directions 2012.

Not only is everything he talks about still relevant, it relates directly to what Direction 16 is about. … Read more »

Respond Speaker Insight: The inimitable Ethan Marcotte

  • In: Blog
  • By:
  • March 30, 2016
  • Comments Off on Respond Speaker Insight: The inimitable Ethan Marcotte

In the leadup to our Responsive Web Design focussed event, Respond, in Sydney and Melbourne in April 2016, and as part of a special new project we’ll be announcing at the conference, we’ve been speaking with some of our speakers, and getting to know them a little better.

This week, … Read more »