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But even then, themes often emerge organically that we never really considered. When we first imagined the conference that became Transform, about 18 months ago, we had been taking note of the rise of a "second wave" of government digital service delivery. The UK's Government Digital Service had kicked off this human centred, design and research led approach, which was adopted increasingly around the world, including in Australia with the DTO (now DTA). Our focus for Transform was originally very much "the last mile" – delivering (as, for the most part, has been the focus of GDS, and DTA and the US Digital Service) the design, development and delivery of services. But this year, in particular, as I've been chatting with speakers both international and local about the event, time and again the conversation has turned to the importance of policy. No matter how good service delivery is, poorly developed policies, or policies that - even with the best possible motivation - are created in a vacuum, will not deliver ideal outcomes. More than one speaker has talked about the need for an 'agile' approach to policy development, and the sense I get as an outsider is that policy is still very much made in a 'waterfall' manner. This issue has come up with almost every speaker, more or less spontaneously, and I feel (and hope) it is an issue that may gain momentum in the coming months. I'm sure it will get a lot of attention at Transform, in Canberra March 30th." ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Transforming Policy and Delivery" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(372) "Agile, human centred, research driven government service delivery is increasingly at the heart of the development of government digital services. But these services exist to implement policies. And yet how are these policies made, and isn't it time the development of policy became more agile, human centred, and research driven? This will be a key theme for Transform 17." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(28) "transforming-policy-delivery" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-03-17 13:47:12" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-03-17 02:47:12" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=7008" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#271 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(6299) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-03-24 09:18:10" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-03-23 23:18:10" ["post_content"]=> string(4134) "Regular readers will know that here in Australia, and around the World, the way in which Government services are delivered is undergoing a revolutionary change. "Digital by default", user-centred not technology-driven (in the words of Leisa Reichelt, Head of Service Design at the Digital Transformation Office (DTO), "GOV.AU is not a technology project"), Governments are trying to (and in fairness succeeding in) doing things differently. But there's an elephant in the room. Procurement, which for those who don't deal with Governments commercially, is "the act of acquiring, buying goods, services or works from an external source, often via a tendering or bid process". And the reason why many really smart, talented individuals with skills and knowledge Governments really need to do things better don't work with Governments is the complexity and effort associated with procurement. Luckily, smart people in Government also realise this is a challenge, and the World leader in Government service delivery transformation (which really is a mouthful) the UK's Government Digital Service (GDS) developed a digital marketplace, to make it much less complex and time consuming for
all public sector organisations ... to find people and technology for digital projects
including
people to work on digital projects, eg technical architects and web designers
OK, that's the UK, what about here in Australia? Well, today in addition to releasing an alpha of GOV.AU DTO also announced Australia's own Digital Marketplace. While it's not there yet it's clear where things are headed, and it is, if the UK experience is any indication, a significant improvement, and also a real opportunity for individual professionals, and smaller agencies looking to work with Government here in Australia. But what about today? Well, there's a real opportunity right now to potentially work with the DTO at all levels of Government. The DTO has a request for Tender open for locations all over Australia:
to establish a panel of Digital Service Professionals. The DTO has identified nine service categories required to support the work of the DTO:
  • Product Management;
  • Business Analysis;
  • Delivery Management and Agile Coaching;
  • User Research;
  • Service Design and Interaction Design;
  • Technical Architecture, Development, Ethical Hacking, and Web Operations;
  • Performance and Web Analytics;
  • Inclusive Design and Accessibility; and
  • Digital Transformation Advisors.
But it closes April 4th at 2pm Canberra time. Personally, I'm as baffled by the process of tendering as just about anyone who doesn't do it regularly, so if you're thinking "awesome, but this is too complex and I'm too busy…" well, hopefully we might be able to help you a bit. We happen to know folks who do do this sort of thing regularly, and have roped one of them in to help you do it too. All you need to do is free up a couple of hours on the evening of Thursday March 31, that's next Wednesday, from 6pm at our Surry Hills office (if you're not Sydney based, or can't make it we'll see what we can do to help). We'll walk you though the process, and demystify the terms, and what you have to do. It's free, so if you are keen, even if you're not in Sydney or can't make it, just fill in this form, and we'll either see you there, or find some way to help demystify this all a bit, and get the best chance to get on this panel. Honestly, don't miss the chance." ["post_title"]=> string(47) "An extraordinary chance to work with Government" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(36) "extraordinary-chance-work-government" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-03-24 12:20:28" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-03-24 02:20:28" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.webdirections.org/?p=6299" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["post_category"]=> string(1) "0" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#270 (25) { ["ID"]=> int(3865) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "7" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2011-11-07 08:06:24" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2011-11-06 22:06:24" ["post_content"]=> string(2765) "

Web Directions South 2011, Sydney, October 13th.

Presentation slides

Session description

The Australian War Memorial is connecting and enriching online archives and collections toward building a platform for telling history. Through Drupal 7 and Linked Data, the Memorial intends to develop tools that designers, researchers and historians can use to help find new ways of building historical narratives. During this session we will demonstrate some early prototypes and experiments, key uses of Linked Data, practical publishing tools and discuss how this work is unfolding inside one of Australia’s major collecting institutions.

About Adam Bell

Photo of Adam BellAdam Bell leads the web production team at the Australian War Memorial, where he works with curators and historians to publish the Memorial’s vast archives and collections online. He has a background as an artist, cultural worker, teacher and printmaker and plays in a rock n roll band. Follow Adam on Twitter: @bumphead

About David Peterson

Photo of David PetersonDavid Peterson has been pushing at the boundaries of Web development since 1995; that combined with a background in wildlife cinematography brings fresh insight into what can be a geeky sort of space. He has built a number of high profile sites for the ABC, Australian science groups and many others. David works as a consultant with PreviousNext and lives way down south in cool Tasmania — regularly breathing on his fingers just to tap away at the keyboard. He is busy building Web apps built with Open Source toolkits utilising Java, PHP, Python, Linked Data and the almighty Drupal. He enjoys exploring deep into the guts of the Semantic Web and Linked Data to discover new connections and visualisations that help empower story tellers. Follow David on Twitter: @davidseth" ["post_title"]=> string(107) "Adam Bell & David Peterson - Bringing History Alive: Telling stories with Linked Data and open source tools" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(535) "

Photo of Adam BellPhoto of David PetersonDuring this session we will demonstrate some early prototypes and experiments, key uses of Linked Data, practical publishing tools and discuss how this work is unfolding inside one of Australia’s major collecting institutions.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 2.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

The USA and UK governments have made significant progress with linked, open data in recent months. Several fundamental datasets from the Australian Government are on the cusp of being exposed as meaningful, reusable, machine-​​readable assets, further driving the adoption of linked data within and around government. Making better use of online data offerings using a combination of top-​​down policy and guidance, together with bottom-​​up development efforts from agency web teams, would seem to describe a sustainable, organic growth in linked government data. Learn about the path to the first release of data​.gov​.au; a draft roadmap to future releases; the barriers to linked data and open public sector information (PSI); and the real-​​world questions this technology aims to solve.

About Gordon Grace

Gordon Grace PortraitBased in the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO), Gordon has been working on whole-​​of-​​government websites and Australian Government web policies since early 2006. Gordon likes making attractive, useful things that matter to people. He’s some thing of a ‘plate spinner’, and likes to punish himself by taking on too many projects at once. Gordon can often be found prodding and lifting dirty great big IT systems over usability, accessibility and standards-​​compliance hurdles, gently preparing them for the hostile, unforgiving and unpredictable web. Gordon lives in Canberra with his wife and two young children, who are rarely hostile, frequently forgiving, and always unpredictable. Follow Gordon on Twitter: @gordongrace
" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Gordon Grace - More than raw: government data online" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(435) "

Gordon Grace PortraitLearn about the path to the first release of data​.gov​.au; a draft roadmap to future releases; the barriers to linked data and open public sector information (PSI); and the real-​​world questions this technology aims to solve.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 10.45am.

Presentation slides

Session description

Web standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don't always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we'll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before. We'll explore techniques for deciding what client technologies to use on your projects, how to drive the adoption of newer techniques and how not to leave your audience behind. We'll even talk about how to make all of this possible with Internet Explorer in the room.

About Tatham Oddie

Tatham Oddie PortraitTatham Oddie is a technical strategist and roaming consultant. For the third year in a row he is a recipient of the Microsoft-issued "Most Valuable Professional" award, and a regular presenter and participant at conferences and industry groups throughout Australia, New Zealand and North America. His business experience includes the launch of a successful creative agency, a fashion retail and PR business, and is now focussed on the development of Tixi - a niche ticketing agency. Follow Tatham on Twitter: @tathamoddie
" ["post_title"]=> string(52) "Tatham Oddie - Practicing Web Standards in the Large" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(568) "

Tatham Oddie PortraitWeb standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don't always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we'll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before.

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 14 1.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

Libraries contain masses of beautifully structured data collected over many years. But these records may have their flaws and might now want to be used in ways, such as location based services, that weren't imagined 30 years ago. How can we use existing API's and web services to enrich this data to enable it to be used in a variety of ways. This data also needs to be exposed for others to use and build upon. With the recent release of the Government response to the Web 2.0 taskforce, how can institutions comply with these recommendations by providing their data in usable forms for the public. What's involved in building an API into our resources and how can our data be given more meaning through semantic linkages like RDFa?

About Paul Hagon

Paul Hagon PortraitPaul is the Senior Web Designer at the National Library of Australia and has been working on the web in cultural institutions since 1999. His job entails a mix of design, coding, and accessibility. He is a thinker and "ideas" man. He finds cultural institutions fascinating because of what they bring to society, they are rich resources of information and provide vast potential for exploring hidden treasures. Paul enjoys making these items available and telling their stories in ways that may not be the most obvious. He likes to use technology in a relevant way to enrich the way we can interact with these resources. In 2010 Paul was named a "Mover and Shaker" of the library world by Library Journal. Follow Paul on Twitter: @paulhagon
" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Paul Hagon - Enriching large data sets" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(897) "

Paul Hagon PortraitLibraries contain masses of beautifully structured data collected over many years. But these records may have their flaws and might now want to be used in ways, such as location based services, that weren't imagined 30 years ago. How can we use existing API's and web services to enrich this data to enable it to be used in a variety of ways. This data also needs to be exposed for others to use and build upon. With the recent release of the Government response to the Web 2.0 taskforce, how can institutions comply with these recommendations by providing their data in usable forms for the public. What's involved in building an API into our resources and how can our data be given more meaning through semantic linkages like RDFa?

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Web Directions South 2010, Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, October 15 1.40pm.

Presentation slides

Session description

People are redefining the relationship they have with the organisations they interact with, empowered by social technologies. They are seeking:
  • Human-ness: as organisations have grown in size and become more and more depersonalised, people are wanting more human interactions and personal response
  • Trust: from greenwashing to the GFC, the market's trust has been eroded — people are looking for organisations to say what they mean and mean what they say
  • Co-creation: people are taking a more active role in developing the products and services that they use. And if they don't find what they're looking for, they will often create it themselves
  • Responsibility: people want to engage with organisations that are genuinely addressing the complex issues of sustainability and wellbeing
Building a brand, service or product offering that resonates in this new "economy of meaning" requires a rethinking of an organisation's relationship to the "market" — their customers, stakeholders and the environment. In this presentation Grant Young will examine how innovative organisations are using social technologies and design methods to create multi-dimensional value — both for the organisational and community — and will explore the themes that underpin the examples with a view to applying them in your context.

About Grant Young

Grant Young PortraitGrant is founder of social innovation consultancy Zumio. In this role he combines his 15+ years' experience in online and social technology with his passion for sustainability to help organisations harness these increasingly prominent market forces. Zumio helps its clients — spanning the commercial, government and non-profit sectors — build platforms for social engagement that simultaneously deliver organisational value while increasing societal wellbeing and sustainability. Zumio has recently undertaken projects for the Cancer Institute NSW, the Inspire Foundation, VicRoads and Saasu. Prior to founding Zumio, Grant produced projects for award-winning sustainable design agency Digital Eskimo and managed online communications and social media strategy for conservation organisation WWF-Australia, including for the inaugural Earth Hour (2007). He has also developed web applications for the business sector in the areas of financial and carbon accounting (Saasu, Climate Friendly). Follow Grant on Twitter: @grantyoung
" ["post_title"]=> string(54) "Grant Young - Creating platforms for social innovation" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(474) "

Grant Young PortraitIn this presentation Grant Young will examine how innovative organisations are using social technologies and design methods to create multi-dimensional value — both for the organisational and community — and will explore the themes that underpin the examples with a view to applying them in your context.

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A presentation given at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Presentation slides

Session description

Government has huge amounts of information but how can this be effectively managed and delivered through the web? This session will ‘lift the lid’ on web mapping technology and identify some of the key issues that must be addressed to achieve a successful outcome.

The NSW government SIX Viewer web mapping portal will be used as a case study to demonstrate how terabytes of data can be integrated and delivered via the Internet.

About David Hayward

David Hayward PortraitDavid is the national lead for spatial (location based) solutions for the consulting group Ajilon Australia. He has over 15 years experience with spatial technology working extensively within Government and the mining industry. Focussed on leveraging the web to support the integration of spatial information within mainstream IT, he has led the development of a number of high profile web mapping sites including the NSW government SIX Viewer web mapping portal.

David believes that the increasing demand and awareness of the benefits of locational information will result in spatial technology becoming ubiquitous within IT.

" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "David Hayward - Mapping" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(723) "

A presentation given at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

David Hayward PortraitGovernment has huge amounts of information but how can this be effectively managed and delivered through the web? This session will ‘lift the lid’ on web mapping technology and identify some of the key issues that must be addressed to achieve a successful outcome.

The NSW government SIX Viewer web mapping portal will be used as a case study to demonstrate how terabytes of data can be integrated and delivered via the Internet.

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A presentation given at at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Presentation slides

Session description

This session will look at the government collaborative tool Govdex, how it is currently used by agencies, what it provides, and how you can use it for your projects. GovDex is a resource developed by the Department of Finance and Deregulation to facilitate business process collaboration across policy portfolios and jurisdictions.

GovDex, managed by the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO) in the Department of Finance & Deregulation, promotes effective and efficient information sharing, which is core to achieving collaboration. It provides governance, tools, methods and re-usable technical components that agencies can use to assemble and deploy information services on their different technology platforms. GovDex is a key enabler to a whole of government approach to IT service development and deployment.

About Ralph Douglas

Ralph Douglas PortraitRalph Douglas manages GovDex on behalf of AGIMO and previously worked as a Policy/Budget Analyst within the Budget Group at the Department of Finance and Deregulation. He has developed website content for several Australian government department websites, and has a background in the IT recruitment sector and Finance/IT publishing industry in Sydney and Canberra.

" ["post_title"]=> string(68) "Ralph Douglas - GovDex: Collaborating online in a secure environment" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(1149) "

A presentation given at at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Ralph Douglas PortraitThis session will look at the government collaborative tool Govdex, how it is currently used by agencies, what it provides, and how you can use it for your projects. GovDex is a resource developed by the Department of Finance and Deregulation to facilitate business process collaboration across policy portfolios and jurisdictions.

GovDex, managed by the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO) in the Department of Finance & Deregulation, promotes effective and efficient information sharing, which is core to achieving collaboration. It provides governance, tools, methods and re-usable technical components that agencies can use to assemble and deploy information services on their different technology platforms. GovDex is a key enabler to a whole of government approach to IT service development and deployment.

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A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Presentation slides

Session description

The world is abuzz with social computing: Facebook, My Space, YouTube, Flickr, Wikipedia, blogs, wikis and other spaces powered by Web 2.0 technology. It’s a social revolution, empowering individuals to communicate, share what they know online, and help others locate information that is important to them in both their private and working lives.

Some see all this as a big waste of corporate time, but is it? Is there value in handing over control of collaboration and sharing knowledge to individuals, rather than hoarding it in records systems, knowledge systems, and thousands of network dive folders? Is there a way you can harness this social revolution to help improve our organisation’s knowledge management practices? Is there actually a solid business value proposition for social computing?

Matthew will look at knowledge management in modern organisations, and how you can benefit by learning from the principles of social computing and Web 2.0 technologies. Matthew will introduce two case studies in government that demonstrate successful and not-so-successful ways of employing social computing tools, the factors that contributed to their success, and the pitfalls to watch out for. In particular, he will look at the issues in relation to corporate culture by drawing on recent research in blogs and wikis based on work in organisational psychology by Hofstede.

About Matthew Hodgson

Matthew Hodgson PortraitMatthew Hodgson is regional lead for Web and Information Management at SMS Management & Technology in Canberra. He has over 10 years experience in e-business strategy, information architecture, information management and knowledge management, working with the government and commercial sector to deliver innovative solutions to difficult web problems. Matthew has published papers in the areas of social psychology, has lectured at the University of Canberra on social computing, and is passionate about the way in which technology can positively impact on social change through facilitating interpersonal communication and knowledge sharing.

Matthew’s experience is underpinned by a comprehensive applied knowledge of government and international web and information standards, degrees in organisational psychology and knowledge management, and an intimate understanding of Web 2.0, from folksonomies to wikis and blogs. Matthew blogs at Matt's Musings and is a contributing author at The AppGap.

" ["post_title"]=> string(59) "Matthew Hodgson - Social computing for knowledge management" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(1653) "

A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Matthew Hodgson PortraitThe world is abuzz with social computing: Facebook, My Space, YouTube, Flickr, Wikipedia, blogs, wikis and other spaces powered by Web 2.0 technology. It’s a social revolution, empowering individuals to communicate, share what they know online, and help others locate information that is important to them in both their private and working lives.

Some see all this as a big waste of corporate time, but is it? Is there value in handing over control of collaboration and sharing knowledge to individuals, rather than hoarding it in records systems, knowledge systems, and thousands of network dive folders? Is there a way you can harness this social revolution to help improve our organisation’s knowledge management practices? Is there actually a solid business value proposition for social computing?

Matthew will look at knowledge management in modern organisations, and how you can benefit by learning from the principles of social computing and Web 2.0 technologies. Matthew will introduce two case studies in government that demonstrate successful and not-so-successful ways of employing social computing tools, the factors that contributed to their success, and the pitfalls to watch out for. In particular, he will look at the issues in relation to corporate culture by drawing on recent research in blogs and wikis based on work in organisational psychology by Hofstede.

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A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Session description

It's no secret that just as the web has revolutionised business, the media, and many other parts of our lives, it is also revolutionising how governments and citizens interact, and how government provide services.

But how to do it well is still something of a black art.

In this keynote presentation, the lead of the W3C's eGovernment initiative, José Manuel Alonso, looks at the opportunities the web provides governments, the challenges, old and new, the web poses, and the role of the W3C in helping to develop underlying, interoperable technologies with which to build these services.

José's presentation will cover best practices and methodologies for providing eGovernment services, and look at case studies of how governments and communities are connecting via the web around the world.

About José Manuel Alonso

José Manuel Alonso PortraitJosé is the eGovernment Lead at the World Wide Web Consortium. Prior to joining the W3C, he was the Manager for the W3C Spain Office for three years and also served as the Advisory Committee Representative for CTIC (host of the Spain Office).

José has broad experience in project management, software integration, customer relationship, PR and IT consultancy. He received a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Enterprise Application Integration, both from the University of Oviedo, where he also worked at the Research and Innovation departments as a researcher, developer and lecturer. Previously he worked as consultant and even founded his own web company back in 1997.

" ["post_title"]=> string(72) "José Manuel Alonso - Improving Government through better use of the Web" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(1076) "

A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

José Manuel Alonso PortraitIt's no secret that just as the web has revolutionised business, the media, and many other parts of our lives, it is also revolutionising how governments and citizens interact, and how government provide services.

But how to do it well is still something of a black art.

In this keynote presentation, the lead of the W3C's eGovernment initiative, José Manuel Alonso, looks at the opportunities the web provides governments, the challenges, old and new, the web poses, and the role of the W3C in helping to develop underlying, interoperable technologies with which to build these services.

José's presentation will cover best practices and methodologies for providing eGovernment services, and look at case studies of how governments and communities are connecting via the web around the world.

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A presentation given at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Presentation slides

Session description

Mapping and other mashups have taken the web world by storm - driving innovation in business and government alike. While much of the focus has been on the actual mashup applications, without the data to mashup, we have no mashups. Government, from local to Federal level, collect and manage a significant amount of data, across a very broad range of areas. But giving access to this data to web application developers has technical, policy and legal challenges. In this presentation, Jenny Telford of the ABS looks at these issues from their experience of opening up data from the Australian Census.

About Jenny Telford

Jenny Telford PortraitJenny Telford is currently the Director of Census Products and Services at the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). Jenny has worked in the government sector for over ten years in roles focused on the delivery of data and information through the internet and other channels. The ABS is one of the largest information providers in the country and freely provides data through the website on a range of social, economic and environmental issues.

" ["post_title"]=> string(42) "Jenny Telford - Opening up government data" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(847) "

A presentation given at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Jenny Telford PortraitMapping and other mashups have taken the web world by storm - driving innovation in business and government alike. While much of the focus has been on the actual mashup applications, without the data to mashup, we have no mashups. Government, from local to Federal level, collect and manage a significant amount of data, across a very broad range of areas. But giving access to this data to web application developers has technical, policy and legal challenges. In this presentation, Jenny Telford of the ABS looks at these issues from their experience of opening up data from the Australian Census.

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A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Session description

Technology changes present complex challenges and rich opportunities for senior public sector managers. Finding the balance between innovation and risk management is not easy in an environment where successful engagement depends upon relinquishing control. Using examples from New Zealand's experience, Jason will share lessons and observations about the inevitable growing pains of public sector agencies as they evolve towards Govt 2.0.

About Jason Ryan

Jason Ryan PortraitJason Ryan is the Communications Manager at the State Services Commission, the New Zealand Government's lead advisor on the public management system. He is also a public sector blogger and an advocate for the transformation of public sector communications through the use of social media. Jason wrote the Principles for Public Sector Social Media, a set of guidelines for New Zealand government agencies wanting to use Web 2.0 communication tools to better engage with their publics.

" ["post_title"]=> string(54) "Jason Ryan - Govt 2.0: the public management challenge" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(701) "

A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Jason Ryan PortraitTechnology changes present complex challenges and rich opportunities for senior public sector managers. Finding the balance between innovation and risk management is not easy in an environment where successful engagement depends upon relinquishing control. Using examples from New Zealand's experience, Jason will share lessons and observations about the inevitable growing pains of public sector agencies as they evolve towards Govt 2.0.

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A presentation given at at Web Directions User Experience, Melbourne Town Hall, May 16 2008, and Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

We’re sorry, but slides and podcast for this presentation are unfortunately not available.

Session description

While elections can be exciting times, the underlying data - swings, booth counts, and the like is probably only riveting to psephological tragics. Yet the ABC's election web site managed to take this raw data and make it attractive, compelling and interactive.

In this session, the ABC's Andrew Kesper takes us through the election site, looking at the design decisions, and uses of technology like Ajax, Flash, and interactive maps - tools which have wide applicability for government sites looking to present data in more user-friendly and attractive ways.

About Andrew Kesper

Andrew Kesper PortraitAndrew Kesper has been working at the ABC for the past two years. Andrew's first project was the redevelopment of ABC News Online that launched in mid-2007. This was followed back-to-back by the development of the ABC's Federal Election site, Australia Votes 2007, which launched in September 2007.

Andrew has also developed sites for several ABC current affairs programs including The 7.30 Report, Lateline and Insiders. Pre-ABC, Andrew worked for a web design firm in London, developing web sites for clients such as the British Film Institute and local government organisations. He graduated with a Bachelor of Information Technology from the University of Queensland in 2003.

" ["post_title"]=> string(64) "Andrew Kesper - ABC's election site: making the most of dry data" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(887) "

A presentation given at at Web Directions User Experience, Melbourne Town Hall, May 16 2008, and Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Andrew Kesper PortraitWhile elections can be exciting times, the underlying data - swings, booth counts, and the like is probably only riveting to psephological tragics. Yet the ABC's election web site managed to take this raw data and make it attractive, compelling and interactive.

In this session, the ABC's Andrew Kesper takes us through the election site, looking at the design decisions, and uses of technology like Ajax, Flash, and interactive maps - tools which have wide applicability for government sites looking to present data in more user-friendly and attractive ways.

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A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 30 2008.

Presentation slides

Session description

What does Web 2.0 mean and, specifically, what does it mean for the future of governments? Tara Hunt has been speaking all over the world, talking to government audiences on this subject. She believes that Web 2.0 has very little to do with the technology and everything to do with people. Her talk will cover the main tenets of Web 2.0: openness, collaboration and community and what it means for government.

About Tara Hunt

Tara Hunt Portrait

“Miss Rogue” defines herself as a customer first, marketer second. In 2005, Tara became the marketing director at Riya, where her community marketing theories resulted in huge gains, such as national news mentions before launch and over one million photos uploaded within 24 hours of launch. She doesn’t believe in PR, only in the power of building relationships with a community. She co-founded Citizen Agency in 2006 with the mission of teaching her clients how to work more effectively with the communities they serve. Tara has over seven years experience in non-traditional marketing planning. She maintains a successful blog over at HorsePigCow.

Speaking of community, Tara is a community-based movement evangelist, spending all of her free time on Barcamp, Coworking and Winecamp. She is also a supporter of the Open Source movement, the EFF, Creative Commons and the Intelligrid.

" ["post_title"]=> string(58) "Tara Hunt - Government 2.0: Architecting for collaboration" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(637) "

A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 30 2008.

Tara Hunt Portrait

What does Web 2.0 mean and, specifically, what does it mean for the future of governments? Tara Hunt has been speaking all over the world, talking to government audiences on this subject. She believes that Web 2.0 has very little to do with the technology and everything to do with people. Her talk will cover the main tenets of Web 2.0: openness, collaboration and community and what it means for government.

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But even then, themes often emerge organically that we never really considered. When we first imagined the conference that became Transform, about 18 months ago, we had been taking note of the rise of a "second wave" of government digital service delivery. The UK's Government Digital Service had kicked off this human centred, design and research led approach, which was adopted increasingly around the world, including in Australia with the DTO (now DTA). Our focus for Transform was originally very much "the last mile" – delivering (as, for the most part, has been the focus of GDS, and DTA and the US Digital Service) the design, development and delivery of services. But this year, in particular, as I've been chatting with speakers both international and local about the event, time and again the conversation has turned to the importance of policy. No matter how good service delivery is, poorly developed policies, or policies that - even with the best possible motivation - are created in a vacuum, will not deliver ideal outcomes. More than one speaker has talked about the need for an 'agile' approach to policy development, and the sense I get as an outsider is that policy is still very much made in a 'waterfall' manner. This issue has come up with almost every speaker, more or less spontaneously, and I feel (and hope) it is an issue that may gain momentum in the coming months. I'm sure it will get a lot of attention at Transform, in Canberra March 30th." ["post_title"]=> string(32) "Transforming Policy and Delivery" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(372) "Agile, human centred, research driven government service delivery is increasingly at the heart of the development of government digital services. But these services exist to implement policies. And yet how are these policies made, and isn't it time the development of policy became more agile, human centred, and research driven? This will be a key theme for Transform 17." 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Presentations about government

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Transforming Policy and Delivery

Agile, human centred, research driven government service delivery is increasingly at the heart of the development of government digital services. But these services exist to implement policies. And yet how are these policies made, and isn’t it time the development of policy became more agile, human centred, and research driven? … Read more »

An extraordinary chance to work with Government

  • In: Blog
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  • March 24, 2016
  • Comments Off on An extraordinary chance to work with Government

Regular readers will know that here in Australia, and around the World, the way in which Government services are delivered is undergoing a revolutionary change. “Digital by default”, user-centred not technology-driven (in the words of Leisa Reichelt, Head of Service Design at the Digital Transformation Office (DTO), “GOV.AU … Read more »

Adam Bell & David Peterson – Bringing History Alive: Telling stories with Linked Data and open source tools

Photo of Adam BellPhoto of David PetersonDuring this session we will demonstrate some early prototypes and experiments, key uses of Linked Data, practical publishing tools and discuss how this work is unfolding inside one of Australia’s major collecting institutions.

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Gordon Grace – More than raw: government data online

Gordon Grace PortraitLearn about the path to the first release of data​.gov​.au; a draft roadmap to future releases; the barriers to linked data and open public sector information (PSI); and the real-​​world questions this technology aims to solve.

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Tatham Oddie – Practicing Web Standards in the Large

Tatham Oddie PortraitWeb standards might be second nature to all of us here, but they don’t always fly so easily in the enterprise. Obscure browsers and CIOs watching their bottom line can often leave a passionate development team feeling stifled. In this session we’ll look at how a number of large scale websites successfully adopted new standards and opened their content to more audiences and devices than ever before.

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Paul Hagon – Enriching large data sets

Paul Hagon PortraitLibraries contain masses of beautifully structured data collected over many years. But these records may have their flaws and might now want to be used in ways, such as location based services, that weren’t imagined 30 years ago. How can we use existing API’s and web services to enrich this data to enable it to be used in a variety of ways. This data also needs to be exposed for others to use and build upon. With the recent release of the Government response to the Web 2.0 taskforce, how can institutions comply with these recommendations by providing their data in usable forms for the public. What’s involved in building an API into our resources and how can our data be given more meaning through semantic linkages like RDFa?

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Grant Young – Creating platforms for social innovation

Grant Young PortraitIn this presentation Grant Young will examine how innovative organisations are using social technologies and design methods to create multi-dimensional value — both for the organisational and community — and will explore the themes that underpin the examples with a view to applying them in your context.

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David Hayward – Mapping

A presentation given at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

David Hayward PortraitGovernment has huge amounts of information but how can this be effectively managed and delivered through the web? This session will ‘lift the lid’ on web mapping technology and identify some of the key issues that must be addressed to achieve a successful outcome.

The NSW government SIX Viewer web mapping portal will be used as a case study to demonstrate how terabytes of data can be integrated and delivered via the Internet.

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Ralph Douglas – GovDex: Collaborating online in a secure environment

A presentation given at at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Ralph Douglas PortraitThis session will look at the government collaborative tool Govdex, how it is currently used by agencies, what it provides, and how you can use it for your projects. GovDex is a resource developed by the Department of Finance and Deregulation to facilitate business process collaboration across policy portfolios and jurisdictions.

GovDex, managed by the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO) in the Department of Finance & Deregulation, promotes effective and efficient information sharing, which is core to achieving collaboration. It provides governance, tools, methods and re-usable technical components that agencies can use to assemble and deploy information services on their different technology platforms. GovDex is a key enabler to a whole of government approach to IT service development and deployment.

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Matthew Hodgson – Social computing for knowledge management

A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Matthew Hodgson PortraitThe world is abuzz with social computing: Facebook, My Space, YouTube, Flickr, Wikipedia, blogs, wikis and other spaces powered by Web 2.0 technology. It’s a social revolution, empowering individuals to communicate, share what they know online, and help others locate information that is important to them in both their private and working lives.

Some see all this as a big waste of corporate time, but is it? Is there value in handing over control of collaboration and sharing knowledge to individuals, rather than hoarding it in records systems, knowledge systems, and thousands of network dive folders? Is there a way you can harness this social revolution to help improve our organisation’s knowledge management practices? Is there actually a solid business value proposition for social computing?

Matthew will look at knowledge management in modern organisations, and how you can benefit by learning from the principles of social computing and Web 2.0 technologies. Matthew will introduce two case studies in government that demonstrate successful and not-so-successful ways of employing social computing tools, the factors that contributed to their success, and the pitfalls to watch out for. In particular, he will look at the issues in relation to corporate culture by drawing on recent research in blogs and wikis based on work in organisational psychology by Hofstede.

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José Manuel Alonso – Improving Government through better use of the Web

A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

José Manuel Alonso PortraitIt’s no secret that just as the web has revolutionised business, the media, and many other parts of our lives, it is also revolutionising how governments and citizens interact, and how government provide services.

But how to do it well is still something of a black art.

In this keynote presentation, the lead of the W3C’s eGovernment initiative, José Manuel Alonso, looks at the opportunities the web provides governments, the challenges, old and new, the web poses, and the role of the W3C in helping to develop underlying, interoperable technologies with which to build these services.

José’s presentation will cover best practices and methodologies for providing eGovernment services, and look at case studies of how governments and communities are connecting via the web around the world.

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Jenny Telford – Opening up government data

A presentation given at Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Jenny Telford PortraitMapping and other mashups have taken the web world by storm – driving innovation in business and government alike. While much of the focus has been on the actual mashup applications, without the data to mashup, we have no mashups. Government, from local to Federal level, collect and manage a significant amount of data, across a very broad range of areas. But giving access to this data to web application developers has technical, policy and legal challenges. In this presentation, Jenny Telford of the ABS looks at these issues from their experience of opening up data from the Australian Census.

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Jason Ryan – Govt 2.0: the public management challenge

A presentation given at Web Directions User Experience, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Jason Ryan PortraitTechnology changes present complex challenges and rich opportunities for senior public sector managers. Finding the balance between innovation and risk management is not easy in an environment where successful engagement depends upon relinquishing control. Using examples from New Zealand’s experience, Jason will share lessons and observations about the inevitable growing pains of public sector agencies as they evolve towards Govt 2.0.

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Andrew Kesper – ABC’s election site: making the most of dry data

A presentation given at at Web Directions User Experience, Melbourne Town Hall, May 16 2008, and Web Directions Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

Andrew Kesper PortraitWhile elections can be exciting times, the underlying data – swings, booth counts, and the like is probably only riveting to psephological tragics. Yet the ABC’s election web site managed to take this raw data and make it attractive, compelling and interactive.

In this session, the ABC’s Andrew Kesper takes us through the election site, looking at the design decisions, and uses of technology like Ajax, Flash, and interactive maps – tools which have wide applicability for government sites looking to present data in more user-friendly and attractive ways.

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Tara Hunt – Government 2.0: Architecting for collaboration

A presentation given at Web Directions North, Vancouver Canada, January 30 2008.

Tara Hunt Portrait

What does Web 2.0 mean and, specifically, what does it mean for the future of governments? Tara Hunt has been speaking all over the world, talking to government audiences on this subject. She believes that Web 2.0 has very little to do with the technology and everything to do with people. Her talk will cover the main tenets of Web 2.0: openness, collaboration and community and what it means for government.

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